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Publication numberUS3803715 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication date16 Apr 1974
Filing date29 Nov 1972
Priority date29 Nov 1972
Publication numberUS 3803715 A, US 3803715A, US-A-3803715, US3803715 A, US3803715A
InventorsWallshein M
Original AssigneeWallshein M
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Elastic orthodontic band and method of forming the same
US 3803715 A
Abstract
An orthodontic band for use with orthodontic arch brackets is disclosed which comprises an elongated substantially flat strip of elastic material. The band is suitable for use for moving misaligned teeth from an actual to a desired position. The elastic strip is provided with a plurality of elongated apertures each of which is positioned in the region of a respective bracket - the strip engaging the bracket by passage of the latter through the apertures. The apertures are movable from a first position or an angular orientation in which at least a portion of the elastic strip is under tension to a second position in which the elastic strip is free of tension. The apertures are so arranged and positioned on the strip so that when the apertures are placed in a first position while associated with a respective bracket, tension is applied to the bracket and the band urges the tooth to move towards its desired position. A method of preparing the orthodontic band is described.
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United States Patent [1 1 Wallshein [111 3,803,715 [4 1 Apr. 16, 1974 ELASTIC ORTHODONTIC BAND AND METHOD OF FORMING THE SAME [76] Inventor: Melvin Wallshein, 8645 Bay Pky.,

Brooklyn, NY. 11214 [22] Filed: Nov. 29, 1972 [21] App]. No.: 310,572

Berke 32/14 A Primary Examiner-Robert Peshock Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Friedman & Goodman [57] ABSTRACT An orthodontic band for use with orthodontic arch brackets is disclosed which comprises an elongated substantially flat strip of elastic material. The band is suitable for use for moving misaligned teeth from an actual to a desired position. The elastic strip is provided with a plurality of elongated apertures each of which is positioned in the region of a respective bracket the strip engaging the bracket by passage of the latter through the apertures. The apertures are movable from a first position or an angular orientation in which at least a portion of the elastic strip is under tension to a second position in which the elastic strip is free of tension. The apertures are so arranged and positioned on the strip so that when the apertures are placed in a first position while associated with a respective bracket, tension is applied to the bracket and the band urges the tooth to move towards its desired position. A method of preparing the orthodontic band is described. v

17 Claims, 26 Drawing Figures ELASTIC ORTHODONTIC BAND AND METHOD OF FORMING THE SAME BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates to an orthodontic appliance, and more particularly to an orthodontic band suitable for use with an orthodontic arch bracket, the band being selectively provided with apertures which engage the brackets of teeth in a stressed position of the band to thereby urge the teeth to move from a misaligned to a desired position while the band moves from a stressed to a lesser stressed condition.

Orthodontic devices and appliances which are utilized for the movement of teeth in various manners is known in the art. However, because of the complicated misalignment patterns which a plurality of .adjacent teeth can take, the straightening of such complicated patterns has required great skill as well as a plurality of orthodontic appliances. Frequently, it 'has been necessary to utilize a separate orthodontic appliance in connection with each misaligned tooth. This, in turn, has caused such alignment procedures to be both expensive as well as time consuming. Further, the provision of a plurality of orthodontic devices for movement of the teeth has sometimes occupied substantial space in the mouth to thereby cause discomfort to the patient.

A further disadvantage with the prior art procedures has been that the orthodontic devices which are adapted to move misaligned teeth have frequently been tailored to one or two teeth. It is known, however, that common misalignment patterns can be identified by those skilled in the art. Therefore, the tailoring of separate alignment devices only to one or two teeth, where the frequently occuring pattern involves more than two teeth, is similarly time consuming and costly. There is not available, at the present time, a single orthodontic device which can be programmed or pre-programmed to act on a plurality of teeth forming a frequently or commonly found misalignment pattern;

As suggested above, the prior art orthodontic devices are typically specialized and are suitable for applying forces to a misaligned tooth in a predetermined manner. Thus, there are appliances for rotating, uprighting, depressing and raising teeth. Normally, a device designed to perform one of the aforementionedfunctions is not suitable to perform another of these functions. Accordingly, it is necessary to store numerous types of applicances in order to maintain the facility or. capability of performing all of these functions.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION Accordingly, it is an object of the present invention to provide an orthodontic band for use with orthodontic brackets mounted on teeth which does not have the disadvantage of known orthodontic devices.

It is another object of the present invention to provide an orthodontic band as described above which is simple in construction and economical to manufacture.

It is still another object of the present invention to provide an orthodontic band which may easily be prepared by an orthodontist to fill a particular misalignment tooth pattern.

lt is a further object of the present invention to provide an orthodontic band of the type under discussion which may be provided with apertures adapted to engage brackets mounted on teeth which are preprogrammed to cooperate with a frequently occuring mis alignment teeth pattern.

It is still a further object of the present invention to provide an orthodontic band which can simultaneously perform various functions on one or more teeth.

It is yet a further object of the present invention to provide an orthodontic band used in conjunction with edgewise brackets having an arch wire receiving channel which obviates the need for the arch wire and includes a portion which substantially performs the function of the arch wire.

It is an additional object of the present invention to provide an orthodontic band as above described which can be easily mounted as well as removed from brackets mounted on teeth.

It is still an additional object of the present invention to provide an orthodontic band which is capable of performing various functions on bracket supporting teeth which is not bulky and which provides no discomfort to a patient.

In order to achieve the above objects, as well as others which will become apparent hereafter, the orthodontic band in accordance with the present invention is suitable for use with orthodontic arch brackets mounted on teeth, at least one of the teeth being misaligned from its desired position. The band comprises an elongated substantially flat strip of elastic material having bracket engaging means. Said bracket engaging means are adapted to engage a bracket on a misaligned tooth. Said bracket engaging means is movable from a first position in which at least a portion of said elastic strip is under tension to a second position in which said elastic strip is free of tension. Said engaging means is so arranged in a first position that the tension applied to the bracket and the tooth urges the tooth to move toward its desired position.

According to a presently preferred embodiment, said elastic strip is made from rubber, plastic or other relatively stiff flexible-material. The bracket has an enlarged front portion and, according to one embodiment, said engaging means comprises aperture means for receiving the enlarged front portion when said aper ture means is elastically deformed. To secure engagement, said aperture means comprises an aperture, the greatest dimension of which is smaller than the dimension: of the enlarged front portionof the bracket. Thereby, once the front portion is urged through said aperture by enlarging the latter, said band becomes securely associated with the bracket.

Advantageously, the band. cooperates with a plurality of brackets on a single row of teeth. Said engaging means then comprises a plurality of spaced apertures each adapted to engage another bracket.

The desired position of a tooth defines a predetermined position and angular orientation of the bracket.

According to one form of the strip, said engaging According to another feature of the present invention, said directed aperture means may be so changed in position or angular orientation so that it acts from a position or angular orientation on the other side of said predetermined position or angular orientation.

According to other features of the present invention, the strip may be provided with elongated edge portions having enlarged cross-sections or middle portions having an enlarged cross-section compared with the thickness of the strip. A projection may extend from one of the sides of the middle portion, said projection being configurated to be received in a channel for preventing excessive advancement of the bracket in the direction of the strip.

Also forming part of the present invention is an orthodontic strip of elastic material, prior to provision of engaging means, for cooperatively engaging a bracket mounted on a tooth. Said strip includes an elongated flat middle portion suitable for having portions removed therefrom to thereby form apertures engageable with the brackets. I

The method of forming an orthodontic band for use with an orthodontic bracket comprises the steps of forming a substantially elongated elastic strip. Subsequently, apertures areselectively formed in said strip for engaging the brackets. When the band is utilized to move a tooth from a misaligned to a desired position, said apertures areformed at such locations of said strip so that when the apertures are engaged with the brackets, the strip is under tension in the misaligned position of the teeth and urges the tooth to move towards its desired location.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS With the above and additonal objects and advantages in view, as will hereinafter appear, this invention comprises the devices, combinations and arrangements of parts hereinafter described and illustrated in the accompanying drawings-of a preferred embodiment in which:

FIG. 1 is a front elevational view of four teeth, one of which is misaligned, each tooth having mounted thereon a band and a bracket;

FIG. 2 is a fragmented side elevational view of an orthodontic band in accordance with the present invention, showing four rectangular apertures formed in the band each engageable with a respective bracket of FIG.

FIG. 3 is a cross-section of the band taken along line 3-3 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is a cross-section taken along the line 4-4 of the band of FIG. 2;

FIG. 5 is a front elevational view of the band of FIG. 2 mounted on the brackets of FIG. 1;

FIG. 6 is an enlarged cross-section taken along line 6-6 of FIG. 5; v

FIG. 7shows four spaced brackets, schematically, representing the positions and angular orientations of four teeth on which the brackets are mounted;

FIG. 8 is a band similar to that of FIG. 2 selectively, provided with four. apertures arranged to engage the brackets of FIG. 7 for aligning the misaligned teeth;

FIG. 9 is a band similar to that of FIG. 8, where the two middle rectangular apertures are slightly turned angularly so as to provide overcompensation in the biassing means represented by the band;

FIG. 10 is a fragmented front elevational view of a band similar to that of FIG. 2 prior to being provided with apertures;

FIG. 11 is a cross-section taken along linelI-ll of FIG. 10;

FIG. 12 is a fragmented front elevational view of a second embodiment of the band as shown in FIG. I0 wherein the band is provided with two enlarged edge portions;

FIG. 13 is a cross-section of the band of FIG. 11 taken along line l3l3;

FIG. 14 is similar to FIG. 7, showing schematically an arrangement of misaligned teeth as represented by the brackets mounted thereon;

FIG. 15 is similar to FIG. 8, wherein the elongated rectangular slots are replaced by spaced rectangular apertures;

FIG. 16 is a cross-section of the band of FIG. 15 along line I616;

FIG. 17 is similar to FIG. 9 wherein the rectangular apertures of FIG. 15 are arranged to provide overcompensation;

FIG. 18 is' a front elevational view of a further embodiment of the band as shown in FIG. 15 wherein the band is provided with an enlarged middle portion configurated to fit inside a channel of an edg ewise bracket;

FIG. 22 is similar to FIG. 20, wherein the band is replaced with the embodiment of FIG. 21;

FIG. 23 is a top elevational view of an arch of teeth, showing two misaligned teeth and the manner in which the band in accordance with the present invention acts on these teeth to bring the latter into alignment;

FIG. 24 is similar to FIG. 2, wherein the slots are arranged to orient the upper anterior teeth into normal mesial inclinations;

FIG. 25 is similar to FIG. 24 but wherein the slots are arranged to orient the lower posterior teeth into normal upright inclinations; and FIG. 26 shows schematically how the band of FIG. 25 can be used to torque teeth.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS Referring now to the FIGURES, wherein identical or similar parts are designated by the same reference nu-- merals, and first referring to FIG. 1, four teeth 10-13 forming part of a row of teeth are shown each having mounted thereon a respective metal band l0'l3 in a conventional manner. Edgewise brackets l6a16d are each mounted on a respective one of the bands l0l3'. The brackets to bedescribed are of the type commonly known as edgeweise brackets, to be more specifically described hereafter. However, the present invention is not to be construed as being limited to use only with respect to such brackets and any other brackets which are more suitable may be utilized. Also, the present invention may be used to align teeth on which the brackets are directly mounted without intervening bands.

Without going into detail, it is well known that teeth, for example, in the human mouth are frequently misaligned from desired positions as a result of many causes which need not be examined here. Misalignment may take many forms. For example, a tooth may be excessive'ly turned about its long axis in one direction or another. Also, it is possible for a tooth to be set too high or too low with respect to the adjacent teeth. Frequently, teeth, particularly the anterior teeth, tip in either the mesial or the distal directions of the mouth.

Referring to FIGS. 1-3, an elastic band 20, in accordance with the present invention, is illustrated. The elastic band 20 may be made from any elastomeric material such as rubber or plastic. The band 20 is in the form of an elongated flat stip 22 provided with a plurality of apertures in the form of rectangular slots 24-27 distributed along its length. The position of each of the slots as well as its angular orientation is selected as to be described hereafter. Each of the rectangular slots forms at the upper edge, as viewed in FIG. 2, a slot upper bounding portion 22a. A similar bounding lower portion 22b is created adjacent the lower edge of the strip 22. The portion of the strip 22 generally included between the apertures or slots 24 and 25 is designated by the reference numeral 220. Reference numerals 22d and 22e respectively designate the strip portions between slots 25 and 26 and slots 26 and 27.

The slots in FIGS. 2 and 4 are illustrated as being approximately equally spaced from one another. Also, each of the rectangular slots defines a direction which is substantially normal to the length of the strip 22. The actual positions and angular orientations of the brackets l6a-16d represent the positions and orientations of the brackets when they are mounted on teeth 10-13 prior to alignment. The teeth, in their desired positions, define desired postions and angular orientations of the brackets 16al6b. It is the function of the elastic band 20 to move the misaligned teeth from their actual to their desired positions by acting on their respective brackets. Although the rectangular slots are shown substantially uniformly spaced from each other and are vertically disposed, these positions and angular orientations are merely illustrative each slot must be so formed so as to urge a bracket on a misaligned tooth from an actual position and angular orientation to desired ones as to be described. As is well known, the desired positions of all the teeth in the mouth are not such that their long axis are vertically disposed. For example, the maxillary anterior teeth incline slightly in either the mesial or the distal directions as viewed from the facial direction. The desired positions as well as angular orientations of each of the teeth is well known to those skilled in the art. Accordingly, the rectangular slots 24-27 are so arranged on the elastic strip 22 so as to correspond with the positions and angular orientations of the brackets l6a-16b when. mounted on teeth aligned in the desired positions.

In FIGS. 5 and 6, the strip 22 of FIG. 2 is mounted on the teeth 10-12. In the mounted position of the strip 22, each of the brackets l6a-l6d passes through and engages a respective rectangular slot 24-27. As best seen in FIG. 6, each edgewise bracket 16 comprises an arch wire receiving channel 32 and two wings 34. The wings 34 and a base 30 together form receiving spaces between the wings 34 and the band or tooth 36 for receiving the slot bounding portions 22a and 22b respectively. The maximum dimension of each of the rectangular slots 24-27 is slightly smaller than the distance span defined by the wings 34 so that the slots must be enlarged by elastically deforming the strip 22, and more specifically by separating the bounding portions 22a and 22b adjacent to each slot. After the bracket 16 has penetrated the slot, the bracket becomes securely engaged therein by the retaining action of the wings 34.

Referring to FIG. 5, it will be noted that each of the brackets l6a-l6b has its individual position as well as angular orientation correspond to the respective tooth on which it is mounted. When the band 20 of FIG. 2 is mounted on the brackets of FIG-5, the strip portions 22c22e become stressed in those instances where two adjacent brackets are spaced further apart from each other than the spacing between the same two respective slots in the unstressed elastic strip 22 of FIG. 2.

With the bracket 16a substantially vertically oriented and with the bracket 16b angularly oriented slightly in a clockwise direction as viewed in FIG. 5, the strip portion 220 becomes stressed under tension in such a man ner as to urge the bracket 16b to turn in a counterclockwise direction. Similarly, bracket 16c is shown on a misaligned tooth angularly postioned in a slightly couterclockwise direction. Thus, the aperture 26 or slot 26 urges the bracket 16c to turn in a clockwise direction due to the elastic deformation of the strip portion 222. It should also be clear that if any two adjacent brackets are spaced from each other a distance greater than the corresponding distance between the two adjacent slots which engage with these brackets, the strip portion therebetween is elastically deformed and tends to draw the two brackets together towards a desired relative po sition.

Although the elastic band 20 is advantageously uti lized under tension so as to tend to pull adjacent brackets together, it is also contemplated that the band be made from a sufficiently stiff material, such as a plastic strip, which acts as a compressive element. In the latter instance, the rectangular slots 24 are spaced distances slightly greater than the actual distances of the misaligned teeth. The strip 22 can be slightly warped or bent so as to permit the engagement of the brackets on the misaligned teeth with the rectangular slots. The elastic strip in such an instance, while trying to straighten out, tends to push apart the two adjacent brackets on which they are mounted.

The elastic strip 22, as viewed in FIG. 2, has been descirbed as being in its unstressed state. When mounted on the brackets l6a-l6d as shown in FIG. 5, those elastic strip portions between adjacent slots which are placed under tension will act as continuous biassing devices which urge the brackets to move in such a direction which tends to restore the strip portions under tension to their normally unstressed state shown in FIG. 2. Theoretically, if the strip 22 is permitted to continue acting on the brackets l6a-l6d for anindefinete period of time, the strips will move the engaged brackets 16a-16d to positions as well as angular orientations which correspond with those of the slots 24-27 as shown in FIG. 2. In other words, the elastic band 20 will In FIG. 7, the brackets 16a-16b are shown absent the bands and teeth on which they are mounted. Assuming that the rectangular slots 24-27 in FIG. 8 represent the desired positions and angular orientations of the bracket shown in FIG. 7, the rectangular slots may be so provided on the strip 22 so as to overcompensate the action described in connection with FIGS. 2-5. For example, bracket 16b in FIG, 7 is shown to have an angular orientation which is slightly counterclockwise. Instead of providing the rectangular slot in such a manner so as to correspond to the desired position of the bracket, as designated by the slot 25 in FIG. 8, a slot 25 may be provided, as shown in FIG. 9, which is angularly oriented in the opposite sense to the actual orientation in relation to the desired orientation. Similarly, the bracket 160 in FIGS. 7 is shown to have an annular orientation which is slightly clockwise. Instead of the slots 26 of FIGv 8 in a desired angular orientation, a slot 26' may be provided whose angular orientation is slightly counterclockwise on the other side of the desired orientation as that of'the actual orientation of the bracket I6c. Now, when the strip 22 of FIG. 9 is mounted on the brackets 16a-16d of FIG. 7, the stresses generated in the strip 22 will generally tend to be higher than those which would have been formed had the strip 22 of FIG. 8 been mounted on the brackets. The increased stresses with the overcompensated strips are utilized, it is necessary to supervise the move ment of theteeth so as to insure that the overcompensated strip is removed once the teeth become aligned. Otherwise, it is. possibie for the teeth to become misaligned in an opposite sense. Namely, the overcompensated strip 22-must be removed since if it is not removed when the teeth become aligned, the brackets 16b and 160 of FIG. 7 will continue to move beyond the desired positions and angular orientations defined by the slot 25 and 26 of FIG. 8 towards the positions and angular orientations of the slots 25' and 26 of FIG. 9.

FIGS. 10 and 11 show a blank strip 40 similar to elastic strip 22 prior to the formation of the rectangular slots. It should be pointed out in this connection, that the rectangular slots may either be preformed or, may be formed by an orthodontist who is seeking to align the teeth. As is well known to those skilled in the art,

there occur common misalignment patterns of the teeth. Specially prepared bands may be provided with prepunched rectangular slots which are specifically postioned and angularly oriented to align teeth which form such a common misalignment pattern. In other cases, itis necessary for the orthodontist to punch the rectangular slots in a blank strip 40 to suit a particular misalignment problem. For example. the strip 22 in FIG. 8 may be an example of a preformed strip adapted or formed to remedy a typical misalignment pattern illustrated in FIG. 7. Similarly, the common misalignment pattern of FIG. 7 may likewise be remedied with a standardized or preformed overcompensated strip 22 to aecellerate the alignment process. Specific examples of bands which can be preformed or preprogrammed to remedy common misalignment patterns are shown in FIGS. 24 and 25. The strip 100 of FIG. 24 includes three slots 101403 inclined towards the upper-left direction, as viewed in FIG. 24, while slots 104-106 are inclined towards the upperright. The strip 100 is particularly suitable to give the upper anterior teeth desired mesial inclinations. In FIG. 25, the strip has upright slots 1lll 17 which are particularly suitable to upright the lower anterior teeth. Although these strips may be preprogrammed, they may, of course, be prepared from the blank strip 40 of FIG. 10 by punching the same slot arrangements. If, for example, the pattern represented by the brackets of FIG. 7 was not a common misalignment pattern, then the strips 22 of FIG. 8 or the overcompensated strip 22 of FIG. 9 .could be prepared by an orthodontist by punching the rectangular slots as shown and described.

The slots of FIGS. 2, 8 and 9 have generally been shown and described as being symmetrically positioned about a median line running along the center of the strip. It is also possible, to punch the slots above or below the median line so as to change the width of the bounding portions 22a or 22b. In this manner, it is also possible to depress or raise a tooth substantially along its long axis.

In accordance with a slight modification of the strips 22 discussed thus far, a strip 50 is shown in FIG. 12 as having enlarged edges portions 52. As before, the rectangular slots may still be punched or otherwise formed in the middle, substantially flat, portions of the strip 50. However, the provision of the enlarged edge portions 52 provide additional rigidity and strength to the strip. The additional body increases the stresses generated in the strip portions when placed under tension this increasing the biassing forces on the brackets when a strip portion between two brackets is placed under tension. Consequently, the teeth will tend to move at a faster rate towards the desired positions if the slots correspond to the desired positions and angular orientations, as in FIG. 8, or beyond the desired positions and orientations if rectangular slots of FIG. 9 are utilized.

In FIGS. 14-17, a further embodiment 60 of the elastic band in accordance with the present invention is illustrated. The band 60 comprises an elastic strip 22 as heretofore described. However, each rectangular slot 24 has been replaced by two spaced rectangular apertures. Thus, the rectangularslot 24 is replaced by rectangular apertures 24a, 2412; the aperture 25 is replaced by rectangular apertures 25a, 25b, and so on. Each rectangular aperture is dimensioned so that a wing of a bracket may pass therethrough the median portions of the strip 22 between each pair of rectangular apertures being dimensioned so as to fit in the channel of an edgewise bracketv As with FIGS. 7,9, the rectangular apertures may be positioned and angularly oriented so as to either correspond to desired positions and orientations of the teeth or overcompensated positions and angular orientations. Thus, the slots 24a. 24b; 25a, 25b; 26a, 26b,- and 27a, 27b are positioned and angularly oriented to correspond to the desired positions of brackets on properly aligned teeth. On the other hand, in FIG. 17, apertures 25a',25 b' and 26a',26b' are angularly oriented in an overcompensated manner similarly to the slots 25' and 26' of FIG. 9.

The operation of the band 60 is similar to that of band 20. However, because the band 60 provides a median portion which fits inside the channel of the bracket, it is possible, in some instances, to eliminate the arch wire by providing an enlarged median or middle portion 78 as illustrated in FIGS. l820. The medium portion serves, in many respects, similar functions as the enlarged edge portions 52 of the strip 50 of FIGS. 12 and 13.

In FIG. 21, a band 70 is provided with a projection 79 which, when the band 70 is mounted on an edgewise bracket, prevents the enlarged median or middle portion 78 from fully penetrating the channel 32. Thus, if the enlarged middle portion 78 acts as an arch wire, and is therefore substantially rigidly positioned as shown in FIG. 22, the upper bounding portion 220 and the lower bounding portion 22b would normally tend to pull the bracket in the direction of the enlarged portion 78. However, because the projection 79 is interposed between the enlarged portion 78 and the bracket, the movement of the bracket in the facial direction can thereby be limited. Also, a bracket or tooth can be offset in a lingual direction.

In FIG. 23, a dentition or row of teeth 90 generally forming an arch is shown to comprise teeth 91-98. The teeth are each respectively provided with a bracket 1611-161. Between each two adjacent brackets thereis respectively provided a respective strip portion 22c22m. In addition to the uprighting functions which the elastic band in accordance with the present invention can perform, as set forth above in connection with the description of the FIGURES, the elastic band can also aid in the movement of teeth in the facial or the lingual directions. For example, the tooth92 is positioned excessively in the facial direction. When the band is mounted on the brackets as shown in FIG. 23, the strip portions 22c and 22d tend to be excessively tensioned and consequently apply a force on the bracket 16b in the lingual direction. Such a force will tend to restore the position 92 to a desired position generally between teeth 91 and 93. Similarly, the tooth 95 is excessivelypositioned in the lingual direction. In order to move the tooth in the facial direction, the strip portions 22j and 22k are placed under tension to thereby pull the tooth 95 in the facial direction.

As suggested above, by moving the slotsor apertures to one side of the median position of the strip, a tooth can be urged upwardly or downwardly so as to depress or raise the same relative to the adjacent teeth. Finally, it should also be mentioned that the band in accordance with the present invention can rotate a tooth. In actuality, there always exist some rotation of a tooth when a substantially tangential force is applied to a bracket mounted thereon. Such rotation result because the force is applied substantially tangentially of the tooth and the force does not act through the center or long axis of the tooth. However, when'only uprighting is desired the strip portions between adjacent'slots or apertures may be so selected so that there is substantially no tension in the strip portions which cause a tooth to be pulled or rotated. In these instances, the tooth is uprighted merely by virtue of the orientation of the slot or aperture.

By twisting any of the aforementioned bands, e.g'., band 120 in FIG. 26, in a manner shown in FIG. 26, a lingual or labial torqueing of a tooth intermediate the twisted portions depending on the direction of the twist. More specifically, the band 120 of FIG. 26 has a portion 122 with slots 124 mounted on teeth to be torqued. After the portion 122 is mounted, the band portions 128, 130 to each side of the portion 122 are twisted in the same sense (clockwise or counterclockwise) in relation to the now stationary portion 122. Although only one twist is shown for each end portion 128, 130, it is clear that many more twists can be formed to increase the torqueing forces. After the end portions have been twisted, the end portions are connected by 126 to teeth postioned to each side of the teeth to be torqued as described above. The tendency of the portion 122,.and therefore also the tendency of the teeth to which the portion 122 are connected, will be to turn as shown by the arrow 132. Although two slots 124 are shown, any number may be provided so that the portion 122 can be connected to a single, double or a plurality of brackets.

Numerous alterations of the structure herein disclosed will suggest themselves to those skilled in the art. However, it is to be understood that the present disclosure relates to a preferred embodiment of the inven' tion which is for purposes of illustration only and is not to be construed as a limitation of the invention.

What is claimed is:

1. An orthodontic band for use with orthodontic arch brackets mounted on teeth misaligned from their desired positions, the band comprising an elongated substantially flat strip of elastic material which can be streteched at least along its longitudinal length, said strip being provided with bracket engaging directed apertures each normally defining a position and angular orientation along said flat strip corresponding to the desired position of an associated tooth, the positions and angular orientations of adjacent apertures being variably movable relative to each other from said normal positions and angular orientations by elongation and deformation of at least portions of said strip, whereby each aperture is adapted to engage the bracket of an associated tooth and simultaneously bias and move the same to a desired position and angular orientation as said portions of said strip, revert to a non-elongated and non-deformed condition and said apertures revert to their normal positions andangular orientations.

2. An orthodontic band as defined in claim 1,

wherein each bracket has an enlarged front portion,

and wherein said directed apertures are adapted to receive the enlarged front portions of the brackets when said directed apertures are elastically deformed.

3. An orthodontic band as defined in claim 1, wherein the band cooperates with a plurality of brackets on a single row of teeth, and wherein said directed apertures are spaced from each other and are each adapted to engage another bracket.

4. An orthodontic band as defined in claim 1, wherein said elastic strip is made from rubber.

5. An orthodontic band as defined in claim 1, wherein said directed apertures comprise substantially rectangular slots. I

6. An orthodontic band as defined in claim 1, wherein each bracket has top and bottom wings, and wherein each directed aperture comprises a pair of spaced apertures each configurated to receive another one of the wings.

7. An orthodontic band as defined in claim 1, wherein said elongated flat strip has two elongated edge portions each enlarged in cross-section compared to the thickness of said strip.

8. An orthodontic bandas defined in claim 1, wherein said elongated strip has an elongated middle portion,.and wherein each directed aperture comprises two spaced spertures in said strip each of which is positioned on another side of said middle portion.

9. An orthodontic band as defined 'in claim 1, wherein said elongated strip has an elongated middle portion which has an enlarged cross-section compared with the thickness of the strip,

10. An orthodontic band as defined in claim 9, wherein each bracket has a channel for receiving-an arch wire, and wherein said middle portion is configurated to be received in the channel once a directed aperture is engaged with a corresponding bracket.

11. An orthodontic band as defined in claim 10, wherein said middle portion has two exposed sides, and further comprising an elongated projection extending from one side of said elongated middle portion which is configurated to be received in the channel for preventing excessive advancement of the brackets in the direction of said strip.

12. An orthodontic band as defined in claim 2, wherein the greatest dimension of each of said directed apertures is smaller than the dimensions of the enlarged front portion of a corresponding bracket, whereby once the front portion is urged through a directed aperture by enlarging the latter the band becomes securely mounted on the bracket.

13. An orthodontic band as defined in claim 1, wherein a desired position of a tooth corresponds to a predetermined angular orientation of the bracket, and

wherein an actual position of a tooth defines an angular orientation of the bracket to one side of said predetermined angular orientation, an associated directed aperture defining an angular direction to the other side of the desired predetermined angular orientation, whereby engagement of the respective directed aperture with the bracket in the actual orientation thereof urges the bracket towards said predetermined angular orientation and represents an overcompensatcd condition which accelerates the desired movement of the tooth. I

14. An orthodontic band as defined in claim 1, wherein a desired position of a tooth corresponds to a predetermined position of the bracket, and wherein an actual position of a tooth defines a position of the bracket to one side of said predetermined position, an associated directed aperture being disposed to the other side of said predetermined position, whereby engagement of the respective directed aperture with the bracket in the actual position thereof urges the bracket towards the predetermined position and represents an overcompensated condition which accelerates the desired movement of the tooth.

15. An orthodontic band as defined in claim I, wherein said strip of elastic material is twisted about its longitudinal axis, whereby a torqueing force is applied to at ieast one of the teeth.

16. Method of forming an orthodontic band for use with orthodontic brackets mounted on misaligned teeth comprising the steps of selectively forming directed apertures on a stretchable and deformable elastic strip, the positions and angular orientations of each aperture corresponding to the desired position and angular orientation of a corresponding bracket and tooth.

17. Method of forming an orthodontic band as defined in claim 16, wherein the band is utilized to move a tooth from a misaligned to a desired position, and wherein said apertures are formed at such locations of said strip so that when the apertures are engaged with the brackets, the strip is under tension in the misaligned position of the teeth and urge the tooth to move towards its desired position.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2705367 *18 Jan 19545 Apr 1955Joseph D BerkeOrthodontic appliance
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
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Classifications
U.S. Classification433/18, 433/11
International ClassificationA61C7/00, A61C7/12
Cooperative ClassificationA61C7/12
European ClassificationA61C7/12