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Publication numberUS3581537 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication date1 Jun 1971
Filing date18 Oct 1968
Priority date18 Oct 1968
Publication numberUS 3581537 A, US 3581537A, US-A-3581537, US3581537 A, US3581537A
InventorsBeall Richard W Jr, Lance Bruce J
Original AssigneeLance Bruce J, Beall Richard W Jr
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Pipe bender and swager
US 3581537 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [72] Inventors Bruce J. Lance 1460 Chase Drive, Corona, 91720; Richard W. Beall, Jr., 500 Poinsettia, Manhattan Beach, both of, Calif. 90266 [2 l] Appl. No. 768,839

[22] Filed Oct. 18, 1968 [45] Patented June 1, 197] [54] PIPE BENDER AND SWAGER 10 Claims, 17 Drawing Figs.

52 u.s.c| 72/32,

72/389 51 lnt.Cl ..B21c5l/00 501 FieldofSearch 7217,22,

[5 6] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,339,385 9/1967 Lance 72/22 3,387,473 6/1968 Noordhoek et a]. 72/22 3,336,776 8/1967 Zerlaut 72/14 2,382,745 8/1945 Powers .11: 72/7 Primary Examiner-Richard J. Herbst Assislant Examiner-Michael J. Keenan Attorney-William C. Babcock ABSTRACT: An improved, manually operable apparatus for forming a sequence of bends of predetermined longitudinal and circumferential spacing in a length of straight tubing by matching first and second insignia to provide a replacement automotive exhaust pipe, and to also permit enlargement of an end of the pipe by swaging.

PATENIED JUN 1m SHEET 1 [IF 4 rNvENToRS. I LANCE Bgl/AED M4 8594C JR.

sauce El Anne/var FIG.9

PATENIEU JUN 1 19m SHEET D? 4 IPIPE BENDER AND SWAGER BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention An improved power-operated apparatus for forming replacement automotive exhaust pipe from straight lengths of tubing and enlarging the ends of the replacement exhaust pipes by swaging.

2. Description of the Prior Art Prior to the present invention U.S. Letters Pat. Nos. 3,196,661; 3,279,236, and 3,339,385 were granted coinventor, Bruce J. Lance, as well as application for reissue Ser. No. 646,760 which is to issue on or about Oct. 1, 1968, all of which pertain to devices for forming replacement automotive exhaust pipes from straight lengths of tubing. Although the devices described in the above-identified patents operate most satisfactorily, they include the operational disadvantage that in forming replacement automotive exhaust pipes the user must manipulate aprotractor and conduct certain measurements as the operation proceeds. This leads to human error, for the user may make mistakes in protractor readings or in calculating the necessary measurements, whereby replace- SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION An exhaust pipe replacement apparatus in which bends ofa specific angulation are formed in predetermined longitudinal and circumferential spacing in a straight length of tubing by the use of a disc provided with a number of first circumferentially spaced stops thereon that are sequentially brought into contact with a number of longitudinally spaced second stops, with the degree of angulation of each bend being controlled either by a notched plate or an apertured bandv The user of the present apparatus is not required to either read a protractor or make measurements, but simply match first and second stops identified by insignia, whereby the possibility of producing a defectively bent exhaust pipe is substantially eliminated.

A major object of the present invention is to provide an apparatus for forming replacement automotive exhaust pipes from straight lengths of tubing without requiring the user of the device to either take protractor readings or make measurements, and as a result, avoid the possibility of producing a defective replacement automotive exhaust pipe.

Another object of the invention is to supply a device for forming automotive replacement exhaust pipes in which a number of first and second stops appropriately identified by insignia are utilized in determining the longitudinal and angular spacing of the bends, as well as automatically controlling the degree of angulation of the bends by either a notched plate or apertured band.

A still further object of the invention is to supply an apparatus for forming replacement automotive exhaust pipes from straight lengths of tubing that is simple and easy to operate, can be used to reproduce a number of replacement exhaust pipes of the same configuration in sequence by prepositioned first and second stops identified by insignia, in combination with a notched plate or apertured band, which apparatus further includes power-driven means for cutting tubing to a desired length and enlarging an end thereof.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a first perspective view of the improved tube bend ing apparatus;

FIG. 2 is a second perspective view ofthe apparatus;

FIG. 3 is a fragmentary side elevational view of the apparatus;

FIG. 4 is a combined vertical cross-sectional and end elevational view ofa support and a disc and ring assembly on which first stops are mounted, taken on the line 4-4 of FIG. 3;

FIG. 5 illustrates the same portion of the apparatus shown in FIG. 4, but with a large diameter ring mounted on the disc as is required for large diameter tubing;

FIG. 6 is a side elevational view of a portion of the apparatus, taken on the line 6-6 of FIG. 5;

FIG. 7 is a fragmentary end elevational view of a portion of the apparatus, taken on the line 7-7 of FIG. 6',

FIG. 8 is a top plan view of one of the second stops used on the device;

FIG. 9 is a top plan view of the tubing end enlarging portion of the apparatus;

FIG. 10 is a vertical cross-sectional view of a portion of the apparatus, taken on the line 10-10 of FIG. 9;

FIG. II is an end elevational view of a portion of the apparatus, taken on the line lIlI of FIG. 9;

FIG. 12 is a perspective view of a support for maintaining tubing of various sizes in aligned position during swaging thereof;

FIG. 13 is a combined fragmentary end elevational and vertical cross-sectional view of a portion of the apparatus, taken on the line 13-13 of FIG. 10;

FIG. 14 is a horizontal cross-sectional view of a portion of the apparatus, taken on the line 14-14 of FIG. 13;

FIG. 15 is a perspective view of a circular member that removably supports an apertured band;

FIG. 16 is a transverse cross-sectional view of the circular member and band shown in FIG. 15, taken on the line -l6-16 thereof; and

FIG. 17 is a schematic diagram of a hydraulic system used in the apparatus.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT The improved apparatus E, as shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, includes a column A that is vertically supported on a base B and an elongate, rectangular cabinet C. Base B and cabinet C are both preferably provided with casters ID to permit easy movement of the apparatus E from place to place over a smooth floor surface H. e

A horizontal support F of V-shaped transverse cross section extends outwardly from column A over cabinet C. A leg G depends from the free end of support F to the floor surface H.

A graduated scale .I extends longitudinally along one side of support F. One end of the length of tubing K to be formed into an automotive replacement exhaust pipe is removably engaged by a disc and ring assembly L. The ring of the assembly supports a number of circumferentially spaced first stops M which project therefrom.

A number of longitudinally spaced second stops N are mounted on support F, each of which are of the structure shown in FIG. 8. Stops M are identified on the ring of the assembly L by a series offirst insignia P, each of which insignia is of a different configuration. Stops N are identified by a number of second insignia P identical to the first insignia P.

The circumferential spacing of the first stops M determine the circumferential spacing between the bends to be formed in the tubing K. Likewise, the longitudinal spacing between the second stops N determines the longitudinal spacing between the centers of the bends to be formed in the tubing K. The angles of the bends to be formed in the tubing K are determined by that portion of the apparatus described as follows.

In FIGS. 1 and 2 it will be seen that the apparatus E includes two identical tube bending jaws O which are in longitudinal alignment and rigidly and removably affixed to two identical heavy plates 18 by bolts, or other conventional fastening means. Plates 18 are mounted on the forward ends of two parallel, laterally spaced shafts 22 that are rotatably supported in bearings (not shown). The bearings and column A are held in fixed relationship by pairs of lugs which extend outwardly from the column in opposite directions. An arm 26 projects outwardly from each of the shafts 22, and a pin 28 extends transversely through each arm to engage bifurcated ends 30 of a piston rod 32. Pistons 34 are mounted on the upper end of the piston rods 32.

Two downwardly and outwardly extending hydraulic cylinders 36 are provided, in which the pistons 34 are slidably movable, as shown in FIGS. 1 and 17. Eyes 38 are formed in the upper ends of the cylinders 36 through which pins 40 extend transversely to be engaged by lugs 42 that project outwardly from the upper part ofcolumn A. I

Hydraulic fluid under pressure can be introduced into the two cylinders 36 through two hoses 44 which are connected to a pressure control valve 46. A pressure gauge 48 is connected to valve 46, and hydraulic fluid under pressure is supplied to this valve through conduit 50 in the manner shown in FIG. I7. Two longitudinally aligned grooves 52 of generally semicircular cross section are formed in jaws O. The diameter of grooves 52 is slightly greater than the external diameter of the length of tubing K in which bends are to be formed.

A semicircular pressure-exerting member 56 is centrally located relative to the jaws Q and situated thereabove as illustrated in FIG. 2. A semicircular groove 52 is formed in pressure member 56 which is in vertical alignment with the two grooves 52. Pressure member 56 is removably affixed to the lower end of'a piston rod 58 by conventional means. A piston 60 is secured to the upper end of the piston rod 58 (FIG. 17).

Piston 60 is slidably movable within an elongate hydraulic cylinder 62, the upper end of which is closed and from which two lugs 68 project upwardly. A pin 70 extends through aligned openings (not shown) in the lugs 68, as well as through an opening (not shown) in an arm 72 that extends forwardly from the upper portion of the column A. Hydraulic fluid under pressure can be discharged into the upper portion of hydraulic cylinder 62 through a conduit 74 (FIG. 17) to force the piston 60, piston rod 58, and pressure-exerting member 56 downwardly. Likewise, when fluid is permitted to escape through the conduit 74, fluid can be discharged into the lower confines of cylinder 62 through a conduit 76 to force the piston 60, piston rod 58 and pressure-exerting member 56 upwardly to place the pressure member in the position shown in FIG. 2. The upper interior portion of cylinder 62 acts as a stop for piston 60 to limit upward movement of the member 56 to the position shown in FIG. 2. When fluid under pressure is discharged through the conduit 74, and the cylinder 62, piston 60, piston rod 58, and pressureexerting member 56 are moved downwardly to permit the grooves 52' of the pressure member to engage a portion of the length of tubing K in which a bend is to be formed.

As a downward force is applied to this portion of the length of tubing K, the jaws Q pivot downwardly and outwardly away from one another to, in cooperation with the pressure-exerting member 56, impart a curve of a desired degree to the portion of the length of tubing K. Jaws Q resist this downward and outward opposing movement, and the degree of this resistance is dependent on the magnitude of force exerted by the piston rods 32 on the arms 26. The degree of resistance the piston rods 32 exerton arms 26 is dependent upon the pressure at which fluid is discharged through the pressure control valve 46 into the upper portions of the cylinders 36. As soon as the pressure-exerting member 56 ceases to apply a downward force to that portion of tubing K in which a bend is being formed, the pressure member starts to move upwardly to the position shown in FIG. 2.

The right-hand one of the shafts 22 (FIG. 1) develops into an exteriorly threaded section 22a of smaller diameter than the balance of the shaft. The threaded section 220 is on the end of shaft 22 opposite to that which is affixed to one of the plates 18. At the junction of the threaded section 22a with the shaft 22 a circumferentially extending body shoulder (not shown) is defined. A number of circular plates R are provided, one of which is shown in FIG. 2. A circular opening (not shown) is formed in the center of each plate R, and this opening slidably and rotatably engages the threaded section 220. A helical spring 78 encircles the section 2211 outwardly from the circular plate R mounted thereon, with the spring being held in a compressed condition by a wingnut 80 that is threaded on section 220.

The compressed spring 78 forces the circular plate R mounted on section 22a into frictional contact with the body shoulder (not shown), whereby the plate tends to rotate concurrently with the shaft 22. A number of circumferentially spaced notches 82 are formed in the periphery of each plate R, with the circumferential spacing between each two adjoining notches determining the degree of angulation of a bend to be formed in the length of tubing K. Each of the notches 82 includes a straight, radially extending side 82a and an angularly disposed side 82h. During the period a bend is being formed in a section of the length of tubing K, the plate R rotates in a counterclockwise direction.

The dimensions of the original exhaust pipe to be reproduced are known, and include the overall length of the original exhaust pipe, the external diameter thereof, the longitudinal distance between centers of the bends in the pipe, the angular spacing of the bends, as well as the degree of angulation of each bend. For each exhaust pipe to be reproduced, a separate circular plate R is provided, with the notches 82 in that particular circular plate being so circumferentially spaced that as bends are formed sequentially in one of the lengths of tubing K, each bend will be of a predetermined angulation, which is that of the comparable bend in the original exhaust pipe. The detailed manner in which plates R is used in sequentially forming bends in the length of tubing K, each to a desired degree of angulation, will be explained in detail hereinafter.

The disc 86 and ring assembly L, in combination with the second stops N, are used to control the longitudinal spacing of the bends in the length of tubing K, as well as the angular spacing of the centers of the bends relative to one another. The disc 86 and ring assembly L, as may best be seen in FIG. 3, includes an elongate tubular member 84 that is secured to the center ofdise 86 and projects outwardly therefrom. A circular rib 88 is transversely mounted on member 84, and is spaced a substantial distance from the disc 86. Rib 88 abuts against one end of the length of tubing K that is to be bent in the manner shown in FIG. 3. A rod 90 (FIG. 3) having a handle 92 mounted on one end thereof is provided, and this rod extends longitudinally through the tubular member 84 into the tubing K to be bent.

Exterior threads 92a are formed on the free end of rod 90, which threads engage a tapped bore (not shown) in a rigid frustoconical member 94. When the handle 92 is rotated in an appropriate direction, the member 94 moves towards the disc 96, and in combination with another member 94 (not shown), radially expands a number of circumferentially spaced, elongate bars 96 into internal gripping contact with the interior surface of the length of tubing K.

A tubular layer of resilient material 98 partially encases the exterior of tubular member 84, and is held in fixed position thereon by two tubular clamps 100, as best illustrated in FIG. 3. When the resilient layer 98 is gripped by the user (not shown) of the machine, the disc 86 and ring assembly L, together with the length of tubing K to which it is connected, may be easily rotated as the tubing rests on the jaws Q.

A number of circumferentially spaced, threaded pins 102 extend outwardly from a first face 86a of disc 86 (FIGS. 3 and 6). Each pin 102 may be engaged by a wingnut 104. A number of rings S are provided, in each of which a circumferentially extending recess 105 is formed that removably engages a peripheral portion of the disc 86, as shown in FIG. 6. In addition, a number of circumferentially extending bores 106 are formed in each ring S that are so spaced as to be engageable by the threaded pins 102. By tightening the wingnuts 104, any desired one of the rings S may be removably mounted on the disc 86 in the manner shown in FIG. 6.

Each ring S is provided with a number of circumferentially spaced, outwardly extending first stops M which are so spaced that as the ring S is intermittently rotated in a clockwise direction (FIGS. 4 and 5), the stops may be sequentially brought into contact with second stops N (FIG. 2) to control not only the distance between the centers of the bends formed in the length of tubing K, but the circumferential spacing between the bends as well. Support F, as shown in FIGS. 3 5, is of V-shaped transverse cross section, and two longitudinally extending lips 108 project from the free edges thereof. The apex of support F is reinforced by a rigid elongate member 109, preferably a length of pipe. A graduated scale J (FIG. 3) is longitudinally supported on one of the lips 108.

Each of the second stops N, as shown in FIGS. 4 and 8, includes two hook-shaped members 110 that removably engage the lips 108. Oppositely threaded rods 112 are affixed to the members 110, and these rods extend inwardly towards one another to be threadedly engaged by a turnbuckle 114.

The first stops M on each ring S are identified by a series of first insignia P, each of a different configuration. The second stops N (FIG. 3) are identified by a series of second insignia P, also each of a different configuration. The insignia P are identical in configuration to the insignia P.

In the bending of the length of tubing K, the tubing is cut by means to be described later to the same length as that of the original exhaust pipe (not shown) to be reproduced. The disc 86 and ring assembly L is then mounted on one end of the tubing K, as illustrated in FIG. 3, with the first stops M being affixed to the disc on one of the rings S in the correct circumferential spacing. The stops N are disposed in spaced relationship on the support F, and the spacing between the second stops determine the spacing between the centers of bends (not shown) to be formed in the length of tubing K.

As the bending operations proceeds, the ring 86 and disc assembly L are intermittently manually rotated, lifted, and advanced relative to the scale J by the user (not shown) to sequentially bring the stops M and N, which are each identified by like insignia P and P, respectively, into contact. During each bending operation on the tubing K, a section of the tubing rest on the two jaws Q.

The diameter of each ring S must be such that when it is resting on the support F in the manner shown in FIG. 4, and a section of tubing K is resting on the jaws Q, the longitudinal axis of the tubing will be in a substantially horizontal plane.

The apparatus E, as may best be seen in FIG. 17, includes a pump 124 that may be mounted at any convenient location relative to column A shown in FIG. 1. Pump 124 is driven by a coupling 126, which in turn is connected to an electric motor 128. The suction pump 124 is connected by a conduit 130 to the lower portion of a reservoir tank 132 that is preferably concealed within the lower portion of column A.

Fluid is discharged from the pump 124 through a conduit 134 that is in communication with a conduit 136 which extends to a multiposition valve 138. Valve 138 can be moved to a first position by energization of a solenoid 140. When the solenoid 140 is energized, fluid is discharged through the valve 138 to flow through a conduit 142 to the valve 121, and from this valve through the conduit 74 to the upper confines of the cylinder 62 to move the piston 60 and pressure member 56 downwardly. When the valve 138 is in this first position, fluid can flow from the conduit 76 through the valve 120 to a conduit 144 connected to valve 138. Fluid enters valve 138 from the conduit 144, and is discharged to a conduit 146 that returns the fluid to the reservoir 132.

When a second solenoid 148 forming a part of the valve 138 is electrically energized, this valve is moved to a second position where fluid discharges therefrom in a path the reverse of that previously described. In this second path, the fluid from valve 138 passes through the conduits 144 and 76 to the lower portion of the cylinder 62 to raise the piston 60, piston rod 58, and pressure member 56 to the position shown in FIG. 2. Concurrently with this upward movement of the pressure member 56, fluid is discharged from the upper portion of the cylinder 62 through the conduit 74, valve 121,, conduit 144, valve 138, and conduit 146 to return to the reservoir 132.

The solenoid is electrically energized by manually closing a switch 150, as shown in FIG. 1., that is preferably foot operated. An electric circuit 152, of which switch 150 forms a part, is connected to a source of domestic electricity (not shown) and also includes a normally closed electric switch 154 (FIG. 1) that is mounted on the column A. A springloaded arm 157 extends outwardly from switch 154. The outer end of arm 157 is provided with .a transverse projecting member 159 that rides on the circumferential edge of the plate R mounted on the shaft 22. The member 159 intermittently enters one of the notches 82 as the plate R is rotated in a counterclockwise direction (FIG. 1) during formation of a bend in the tubing K. When the member 159 is in one of the notches 82, the arm 157 is so disposed as to place the electric switch 154 in the open position. After switch 151) is manually closed, the electric circuit 152 is held in a condition to energize the solenoid 140 by relay means (not shown). When member 159 moves into one of the notches 82, the relay previously mentioned is deenergized whereby the circuit 152 is broken.

When the circuit 152 to solenoid 140 is broken, this circuit by switch means that is not shown herein but is illustrated and described in the prior Lance US Pat. No. 3,196,661, is completed to solenoid 148 to move valve 138 into a second position. Thereafter, hydraulic fluid under pressure flows into the lower portions of cylinder 62 through conduit 76 to move the pressure member 56 upwardly until it occupies the position shown in FIGS. 1 and 2. The apparatus E is then in condition to repeat the above-described operation and form another bend in the length oftubing K.

To prevent the buildup ofa dangerously high fluid pressure by pump 124 in conduit 134, a conduit 116 is connected to the conduit 136, and this conduit 116 to a pressure relief valve 118 that is set for any desired maximum pressure. When this pressure is exceeded, the valve 118 opens and permits fluid to discharge through a conduit 120 into the reservoir 132.

The jaws Q resist pivotal movement to a desired degree as the pressure member 56 moves downwardly, due to discharge of hydraulic fluid under a selected pressure from the valve 46 through the hoses 44 to the upper portion of the pistons 36. As fluid is discharged through the conduit 76 to move the piston 60, piston rod 58, and pressure member 56 upwardly, fluid is also discharged from the conduit 76 through a conduit 50 into the back pressure valve 46, the details of which are best seen in FIG. 17. The valve 46 has a discharge opening formed therein that is connected to the hoses 414.

In detail, the back pressure valve 46 includes an inverted cup-shaped piston 156 that has a number of ports 158 formed in the upper portion thereof, and a ball 160 of lesser diameter than the interior of the piston is disposed within the confines thereof. The ball 160 is adapted to be forced into sealing contact with a seat 162 forming a part of the piston. Piston 156 is at all times urged upwardly in a cylindrical housing 164 by a helical spring 166, the lower end of which rests on a plate 168 that may be moved longitudinally relative to the housing by an adjustment handle 170. Movement of the plate 168 relative to the housing 164 varies the compression on spring 166. When fluid is discharged into the housing 164 through the conduit 50 as the piston 60 in cylinder 62 is moved upwardly, the ball 160 is moved from seat 162 and fluid can flow past the ball through the conduits 44 into the confines of the cylinders 36 to dispose the jaws L in the horizontal position shown in FIG. 1. Movement of the jaws above the horizontal position shown in FIG. 1 is prevented by stops (not shown).

The ball 160, which acts as a check, prevents flow of fluid from the conduit 50 into the conduit 44. However, when the piston rods 32 and pistons 34 connected thereto tend to move upwardly in the cylinders 36, due to outward pivotal movement of the jaws L as the pressure member 56 exerts a downward force on the tubing K, the flow of fluid through the conduits 44, valve 46 to the conduit 50, is resisted by the spring 166. The ball 160 is then in sealing engagement with the seat 162 and fluid can discharge from the conduit 44 to the conduit 50, for the piston 156 and the ball 160 move downwardly as an integral assembly until the upper extremity of the piston is disposed below the opening in the valve housing 164 that is in communication with the conduit 50.

This compression exerted by the spring 166 affords the desired resilient loading to restrain the pivotal movement of the jaws L during the bending operation. After a bend of the desired degree is formed in the tubing K due to downward movement of the pressure member 56, piston 60 and piston rod 58, and the pressure member 56 is moved to the upper position shown in FIG. 1, fluid is again discharged into the cylinders 36 as previously described, with this trapped fluid then being so situated that a restraint of desired magnitude will be imparted to jaws L the next time the pressure member 56 is moved downwardly to form another bend in the tubing K.

In the bending of a length of tubing K to form an exhaust pipe of desired configuration, it is desirable that as the ends thereof be expanded, as by swaging. For this purpose the hydraulic cylinder 178, best seen in FIG. 10, is longitudinally positioned on the upper surface of the cabinet C, which cabinet is rigidly secured to the column A by conventional means. The cylinder 178 (FIG. 17) has a piston 180 slidably mounted therein.

Piston 180 is connected to a piston rod 182 that extends from the left-hand end of cylinder 178. A punch 184 is mounted on the left-hand end of the piston rod 182. The lefthand end of the hydraulic cylinder 178, as viewed in FIG. 9, is connected to a heavy open frame 186, which includes two laterally spaced, parallel sidewalls 188 and an end wall 190. An opening 192 is formed in wall 190 through which the tubing can be projected.

Two arcuate gripping members 194 are provided, as may best be seen in FIGS. 10 and 13, on the interior surfaces of which teeth 196 are formed. The gripping members 194 have tapered exterior surfaces 198 that slidably engage a tapered opening 200 formed in a heavy block 202. Block 202 is of such size as to fit snugly but slidably within the sidewalls 189 and in abutting contact with the end wall 190, as shown in FIG. 10. A handle 204 extends upwardly from block 202 by means of which the block may be raised from, or lowered into the confines of the frame 187. When block 202 is disposed within the confines of the frame 187 it rests on the upper surface 206 of the cabinet C.

A number of sheets 208 are disposed in side-by-side relationship (FIG. 12) and pivotally supported on a bolt 210 that extends outwardly from a U-shaped bracket 212 affixed in a transverse position to the upper free end of cabinet C. a semicircular opening 214 is formed in each of the sheets 208, and the diameter of these openings increases in the direction towards the bracket 212, as best illustrated in FIG. 12. By rotating a portion of the sheets 208 in a clockwise direction (FIG. 11), one of the sheets may be selected in which the opening 214 is substantially the same diameter as that of the exterior surface of the length of tubing K to be swaged.

The sheets 208 are so elevated that when the appropriate one thereof for a length of tubing K of a particular diameter is seleeted, the longitudinal axis of the length of tubing is in alignment with the longitudinal axis of the piston rod 182. When a length of tubing K is supported above the cabinet C (FIG. 10), fluid may be discharged to the cylinder 178 to move the punch 184 to the left to swage the end of the length of tubing K. During the time an end of the length of tubing K is being enlarged it is gripped by the teeth 196 on the arcuate members 194, and held in a stationary position thereby. The greater the force exerted by the punch 184 on the end of tubing K when the tubing is disposed as shown in FIG. 11, the greater will be the gripping force applied to the tubing by the arcuate members 194, due to the conical configuration of the exterior surfaces 198 thereof.

When the handle 122 of the valve 121 is moved to a second position, the fluid can be supplied through either conduit 185 or 187 connected to the end portions of the cylinder 178, as shown in FIG. 17, to cause movement of the piston 180, piston rod 182, and punch 184 either to the right or left.

Two pairs of parallel, adjacently spaced rollers 220 are supported in longitudinally spaced relationship (FIGS. 1 and 2) from support F by two brackets 222 that depend therefrom. A circular toothed cutting member 224 is movably supported by conventional means adjacent column A, and may be manually moved upwardly or downwardly by a handle 228 shown in FIG. 1. When tubing is supported on rollers 220, it may be rotated and cut to a predetermined length by moving the cutting member 224 downwardly relative thereto by means of a handle 228.

In use, operation of the invention is relatively simple. Tubing of an appropriate diameter is cut by the apparatus of the present invention to provide a length of tubing K identical to that of the exhaust pipe (not shown) to be reproduced. A ring and disc 86 and assembly L is then secured to one end of length of tubing K, which is thereafter disposed on the support F andjaws O, as illustrated in FIG. 1.

First stops M are carried on the assembly L in such circumferential spacing as required for the particular exhaust pipe to be reproduced. Second stops N are so longitudinally spaced on the support F as to be adapted for use in the reproduction ofa particular exhaust pipe. A circular plate R that is matched for use in reproducing a particular exhaust pipe, is mounted on the apparatus in the manner shown in FIG. 1.

The first and second stops M and N bearing the first and second insignia P and P, respectively, as previously described, are manually brought into contact (FIG. 1), and the switch closed. The pressure-exerting member 56 then moves downwardly to form a bend in the length of tubing K. Plate R rotates in a counterclockwise direction as the bend is formed, with the bending operation being terminated when the plate has rotated to the extend that the member 159 engages the next notch 82. After a bend has been formed in the length of tubing K, the shaft 22 on which the plate R is mounted, rotates in a clockwise direction (FIG. 1), but the plate R does not rotate this shaft inasmuch as the member 159 is in engagement with the side 82a of one of the notches 82.

The next step in the bending operation is to manually lift the ring 86 and disc assembly L upwardly and forwardly over the second stop N most adjacent one of the first stops M, and thereafter lower the disc and ring assembly to rest ring S on the support F. The disc 86 and assembly L is then manually rotated and advanced with the length of tubing K, to place the next of the first stops N in contact with the next of the second stops M.

In this operation, the pair of first and second stops M and N that are in contact are identified by insignia P AND P of the same configuration. Switch 150 is then manually closed and another bend of predetermined angulation is formed in the length of tubing K. However, prior to the bending operation just described, the punch 184 may be used to enlarge an end of the length of tubing by that portion of the apparatus shown in FIGS. 914 previously described in detail.

An alternate form of plate R is shown in FIG. 15, in which a circumferentially extending groove 219 is formed. Oppositely disposed body shoulders 223 are formed on each side of groove 219, as shown in FIG. 16. A centrally disposed bore 225 is formed in plate R that slidably and rotatably engages shaft portion 22a in the same manner as plate R.

A number of elongate bands 227 are provided, each of which has a number of longitudinally spaced openings 229 formed therein that serve the same function as the notches 82. Each band 227 has engaging and engageable members 230 of conventional design on the ends thereof, which permit each band to be held in a circular configuration on the body shoulders 223. Plate R may remain permanently on the shaft portion 22a, with the bands 227 being mounted on, and removed from plate R for use in bending a length of tubing K to a particular configuration. Each automotive exhaust pipe to be reproduced requires the use of either a particular plate R or a particular band 227 when the alternate plate R is used.

A protractor 232 is preferably defined on the forward face of disc 86 to permit the disc and ring assembly L to be used in the manner described in the Lance US. Pat. No. 3,339,385. When the disc 86 and ring assembly L is so used, the particular S employed therewith will not have first stops M projecting therefrom, and second stops N will not be required.

In FIG. it will be seen that as the diameter of the tubing K increases, the greater must be the diameter of the ring S to maintain the center of the ring in horizontal alignment with the centerline of the grooves 52. Also, as the diameter of the length of tubing K is increased or decreased, jaws Q of appropriate size and a pressure-exerting member 56 must be mounted on the apparatus E. The cabinet C, which is provided with doors 236, provides storage space for the rings of assembly L, plates R, and the bands 227 when the alternate form of plate R is utilized.

We claim:

1. In a tubing-bending machine having a vertical column, two spaced parallel shafts pivotally supported from said column, two plates rigidly affixed to said shafts, a vertically movable member supported from said column and at least partially positioned above said plates, first fluid-actuated power means for moving said member upwardly and downwardly, second power means which tend to restrain pivotal movement of said shafts as said member moves downwardly relative thereto, two elongate longitudinally aligned jaws supported from said plates, each of which jaws have at least one longitudinally extending first groove of semicircular cross section formed therein of substantially the same diameter as the external diameter of the tubing to be bent, a downwardly curved pressure'exerting member supported from the lower end of said vertically movable member, in the lower surface of whichat least one groove of semicircular cross section is formed that is in vertical alignment with said first grooves in said jaws and is of the same diameter as said first grooves, the improvement for bending a length of tubing to form a plurality of bends therein of desired angulation which are longitudinally spaced predetermined distances apart, with at least a portion of said bends lying in different radial planes that are disposed at a desired circumferential angulation relative to one another by intermittently manually advancing and rotating the tubing to consecutively place each of a series of first and second insignia of the same configuration into predetermined positions relative to one another, to permit said machine to sequentially form a plurality of bends in said tubing of predetermined angulation that are in longitudinal and circumferential spaced relationship in the same pattern as the bends in said exhaust pipe, which improvement ineludes:

a. a disc and ring assembly that are removably connectable to an end of said length of tubing, with the diameter of said ring being greater than that of said disc;

b. an elongate horizontal support of concave transverse cross section extending outwardly from said column, with the longitudinally extending center of said support lying in the same vertical plane as that of the centerlines of said grooves in said jaws, and said support including lips that extend outwardly in opposite directions from the sides thereof;

c. a plurality of first stop means circumferentially spaced on said ring;

d. a plurality of second stop means longitudinally spaced on said support, each ofwhich second stop means includes:

1. two hook-shaped members that removably engage said lips;

2. two oppositely threaded elongate members which extend inwardly towards one another from said hookshaped members; and

3. a turnbuckle that engages said threaded members.

e. a plurality of said first insignia that identify said first stop means and a plurality of said second insignia which identify said second stop means; circular rotatable means having a plurality of circumferentially spaced openings formed therein;

g. means for rotating said circular means a portion of a revolution each time said vertically movable member moves to form a bend in said tubing;

h. first manually operable control means for initiating flow offluid to said first fluid-actuated power means; and

i. second control means that are responsive to each of said openings, which second control means reverses the flow of fluid to said first fluid-actuated means upon movement of one of said openings in said circular means to a predetermined position, with said reversed fluid flow resulting in upward movement of said vertically movable pressure-exerting member to a predetermined position, which circumferential spacing between each pair of said openings determines the angulation of one of said bends formed in said length of tubing, and with the circumferential spacing between said first stop means and the longitudinal spacing between said second stop means determining the circumferential spacing between said bends and the longitudinal distance between the centers of said bends respectively, with each of said bends only being formed in said length of tubing after said disc and ring assembly have been rotated and moved longitudinally relative to said support to dispose one of said first stop means in a predetermined position relative to one of said second stop means, which first and second stop means when so disposed are identified by said first and second insignia of like configuration.

2. A tubing-bending machine as defined in claim 1 wherein said circular rotatable means comprises a circular plate in which a number of circumferentially spaced notches are formed in the periphery thereof.

3. A tubing bending machine as defined in claim 1 wherein said circular rotatable means further includes:

j. a circular plate of substantial thickness having a shouldered groove extending therearound;

k. a band in which a plurality of longitudinally spaced openings are formed, which bendl is disposed in a circular configuration and supported in said shouldered groove; and

l. engageable and engaging means on the ends of said band for holding said band in said circular configuration in said shouldered groove.

4. A tubing-bending machine as defined in claim 1 wherein the disc and ring of said disc and ring assembly are separate elements, and said machine further includes:

j. means for removably supporting said ring on said disc.

5. A tubing-bending machine as defined in claim 4 wherein said first stop means comprise a plurality of circumferentially spaced pins that extend outwardly from said ring and said first insignia is defined on said ring.

6. A tubing-bending machine as defined in claim 1 wherein one of said second insignia is provided on at least one of said hook-shaped members.

7. A tubing-bending machine as defined in claim 1 which further includes:

j. a base secured to the bottom of said column;

k. a cabinet secured to said column and extending therefrom under said support;

1. a plurality of casters affixed to the under portions of said base and cabinet to permit movement of said machine from place to place on a smooth surface;

m. a hydraulically operated punch mounted on said cabinet;

n. first means on said cabinet for removably gripping a length of said tubing of any desired diameter and holding a first end thereof in an aligned position relative to said punch to permit swaging of said first end by said punch; and

ill

0. second means on said cabinet for holding a second end of said tubing in an axially aligned position relative to said punch during said swaging operation.

8 A tubing-bending machine as defined in claim 7 wherein said first means further includes:

p. a plurality of internally toothed, arcuate members that engage the exterior surface of said length of tubing, the exterior surfaces of which members slope inwardly and away from said punch;

q. a block having a tapered opening formed therein which slopes inwardly and away from said punch at substantially the same angle as the exterior surfaces of said arcuate members, with said arcuate members being mounted in said opening; and

r. means for removably supporting said block on the upper portion of said cabinet.

9. A tubing-bending machine as defined in claim 7 wherein said second means further includes:

p. a flat bracket secured to the upper portion of said cabinet and which extends upwardly therefrom in a transverse position thereon; and

q. a plurality of parallel sheets pivotally supported on said bracket, in which sheets semicircular openings of different diameters are formed, with each of said openings supporting a second end of length of said tubing ofa particular diameter in an axially aligned position relative to said punch.

10. A tubing-bending machine as defined in claim 7 which further includes:

m. a plurality of pairs of longitudinally spaced rollers;

n. bracket means for rotatably supporting said rollers from said support; and

or power-driven means for cutting said tubing to a desired length when said tubing is rotatably supported on said rollers.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
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US3336776 *24 Jun 196422 Aug 1967Leonard Prec Products CoTube-bending apparatus
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3821887 *23 Jan 19732 Jul 1974Bennett RMethod and apparatus for locating pipe bends
US4037457 *17 Sep 197526 Jul 1977Henderson John ESupport table for pipe bender
US4249405 *12 Apr 197910 Feb 1981Robert CyrWire or cable bending apparatus
US5727419 *26 Sep 199617 Mar 1998Applied Power Inc.Tube bender handle
US704395431 Mar 200416 May 2006Loren BroadyApparatus for straightening a propeller drive shaft
US9073108 *28 Nov 20127 Jul 2015Doyle ElderMobile conduit fabrication work cart for jobsite use
US20050217341 *31 Mar 20046 Oct 2005Loren BroadyApparatus for straightening a propeller drive shaft
US20140144201 *28 Nov 201229 May 2014Doyle ElderMobile conduit fabrication work cart for jobsite use
Classifications
U.S. Classification72/31.4, 72/389.6
International ClassificationB21D7/00, B21D7/12, B21D7/06
Cooperative ClassificationB21D7/12, B21D7/06
European ClassificationB21D7/12, B21D7/06