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Publication numberWO2016206996 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberPCT/EP2016/063365
Publication date29 Dec 2016
Filing date10 Jun 2016
Priority date23 Jun 2015
Publication numberPCT/2016/63365, PCT/EP/16/063365, PCT/EP/16/63365, PCT/EP/2016/063365, PCT/EP/2016/63365, PCT/EP16/063365, PCT/EP16/63365, PCT/EP16063365, PCT/EP1663365, PCT/EP2016/063365, PCT/EP2016/63365, PCT/EP2016063365, PCT/EP201663365, WO 2016/206996 A1, WO 2016206996 A1, WO 2016206996A1, WO-A1-2016206996, WO2016/206996A1, WO2016206996 A1, WO2016206996A1
InventorsARNAIZ Octavio Alejandro SANTANA, Anteneh Alemu ABBO, John Brean Mills, Marc Godfriedus Marie Notten
ApplicantPhilips Lighting Holding B.V.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: Patentscope, Espacenet
Registering lighting node calibration data
WO 2016206996 A1
Abstract
The present disclosure is directed to inventive methods and apparatus for registering lighting unit calibration data. In an embodiment, a luminaire (100) is disclosed, comprising controller (102), a bus (106) coupled to the controller, a plurality of lighting units (104) coupled to the bus, and at least one information provision unit (110) disposed on an outer surface of at least one lighting unit of the plurality of lighting units, wherein the controller is configured to determine, based on information read from the at least one information provision unit, electro-optical calibration data associated with the at least one lighting unit, and cause one or more light sources (108) of the at least one lighting unit to be energized in a manner selected based at least in part on the electro-optical calibration data associated with the at least one lighting unit.
Claims  (OCR text may contain errors)
CLAIMS:
1. A luminaire (100), comprising:
controller (102);
a bus (106) coupled to the controller;
a plurality of lighting units (104) coupled to the bus; and
at least one information provision unit (110) disposed on an outer surface of at least one lighting unit of the plurality of lighting units;
wherein the controller is configured to:
determine, based on information read from the at least one information provision unit, electro-optical calibration data associated with the at least one lighting unit; and
cause one or more light sources (108) of the at least one lighting unit to be energized in a manner selected based at least in part on the electro-optical calibration data associated with the at least one lighting unit.
2. The luminaire of claim 1, wherein the controller is further configured to:
determine a luminaire address within the luminaire at which the at least one lighting unit is installed or is to be installed; and
store, in a database (118), an association between the luminaire address and the electro-optical calibration data associated with the at least one lighting unit.
3. The luminaire of claim 2, wherein the controller is further configured to transmit, to the luminaire address, one or more lighting control commands selected based at least in part on the electro-optical calibration data associated with the at least one lighting unit.
4. The luminaire of claim 1, wherein the controller is further configured to:
receive a command to cause the plurality of lighting units to emit light having a selected lighting characteristic; and energize one or more light sources of the at least one lighting unit in a manner selected to compensate for the electro-optical calibration data so that the one or more light sources emit light with the selected lighting characteristic.
5. The luminaire of claim 1, further comprising a communication interface (103) coupled with the controller, wherein the controller is further configured to receive, at the communication interface, the information read from the at least one information provision unit.
6. The luminaire of claim 5, wherein the information read from the information provision unit is received at the communication interface from a remote computing device (120) that read the information from the information provision unit.
7. The luminaire of claim 1, wherein the information provision unit comprises at least one of a bar code and a quick response code disposed on the outer surface of the at least one lighting unit.
8. The luminaire of claim 1, wherein the information provision unit comprises a radio frequency identification ("RFID") unit or a near field communication ("NFC") unit.
9. The luminaire of claim 1, wherein the controller is further configured to match the information read from the information provision unit to a database record associated with the at least one lighting unit, the database record including the electro-optical calibration data associated with the particular lighting unit.
10. The luminaire of claim 1, further comprising an elongate, flexible housing that contains the bus, wherein the plurality of lighting units are linearly disposed along the flexible housing.
11. A method of configuring a luminaire (100) comprising a plurality of lighting units (104), the method comprising:
determining (306), based on information read from an information provision unit (110) disposed on an outer surface of a particular lighting unit of the plurality of lighting units, electro-optical calibration data associated with the particular lighting unit;
identifying (302) a luminaire address within the luminaire at which the lighting unit is installed or is to be installed; and
storing (308), in a database (118) accessible to a controller (102) of the luminaire, an association between the luminaire address and the electro-optical calibration data associated with the particular lighting unit.
12. The method of claim 11, further comprising causing (314), by the controller, one or more light sources (108) of the particular lighting unit to be energized in a manner selected based at least in part on the electro-optical calibration data associated with the particular lighting unit.
13. The method of claim 12, further comprising:
receiving, at the controller, a command to cause the plurality of lighting units to emit light having a selected lighting characteristic;
wherein causing the one or more light sources of the particular lighting unit to emit light comprises energizing the one or more light sources of the particular lighting unit in a manner selected to compensate for the electro-optical calibration data so that the one or more light sources emit light with the selected lighting characteristic.
14. The method of claim 12, wherein the causing comprises transmitting, by the controller to the luminaire address, one or more lighting control commands selected based at least in part on the electro-optical calibration data for the particular lighting unit.
15. The method of claim 11, wherein determining the electro-optical calibration data comprises matching the information read from the information provision unit to a database record associated with the particular lighting unit, the database record including the electro- optical calibration data associated with the particular lighting unit.
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

REGISTERI NG LIGHTING NODE CALIBRATION DATA

Technical Field

[0001] The present invention is directed generally to lighting control. More particularly, various inventive methods and apparatus disclosed herein relate to registering lighting node calibration data.

Background

[0002] Digital lighting technologies, i.e., illumination based on semiconductor light sources, such as light-emitting diodes (LEDs), offer a viable alternative to traditional fluorescent, HID, and incandescent lamps. Functional advantages and benefits of LEDs include high energy conversion and optical efficiency, durability, lower operating costs, and many others. Recent advances in LED technology have provided efficient and robust full-spectrum lighting sources that enable a variety of lighting effects in many applications. Some of the fixtures embodying these sources feature a lighting module, including one or more LEDs capable of producing different colors, e.g., red, green, and blue, as well as a processor for independently controlling the output of the LEDs in order to generate a variety of colors and color-changing lighting effects, for example, as discussed in detail in U.S. Patent Nos. 6,016,038 and 6,211,626, incorporated herein by reference.

[0003] Luminaires may come in various forms and may accept one or more lighting units, e.g., depending on a number of sockets or other similar lighting unit connectors a given luminaire has. Some luminaires include a flexible string or rope of lighting units, sometimes referred to as lighting "nodes," that may be serially connected in a daisy chain topology. One issue raised by daisy chain topology is that if one lighting node becomes inoperative, it may no longer be able to pass commands and/or power further down the string, causing multiple otherwise-functional lighting nodes to also go out. [0004] Additionally, multiple lighting units installed in a luminaire may be called upon to emit light having a uniform property, such as a uniform color or hue. If the multiple lighting units are heterogeneous (e.g., different models, different manufacturers, different capabilities, etc.), then the light they collectively emit will not likely be uniform. Even if multiple seemingly identical lighting units (e.g., same model, same manufacturer, same number of light sources, same arrangement of light sources, etc.) are installed into the luminaire, unless those lighting units are precisely calibrated, they may collectively emit light that is perceptively non-uniform. While precisely-calibrated lighting units are available, decreased manufacturing tolerances and/or increased calibration costs tend to make such lighting units relatively expensive.

[0005] Thus, there is a need in the art to provide a string-style luminaire and/or lighting unit that will facilitate continued operation by other lighting units when a particular lighting unit is rendered inoperative. Additionally, there is a need in the art to provide a luminaire and/or lighting unit that facilitates installation of the lighting unit in the luminaire such that the lighting unit may be energized to emit light that is uniform with light emitted by other lighting units installed in the same luminaire.

Summary

[0006] The present disclosure is directed to inventive methods and apparatus for registering lighting unit calibration data. A lighting unit installed, or to be installed, into a luminaire alongside other lighting units may have, e.g., disposed on its surface, a so-called "information provision unit." The information provision unit may be "read," e.g., by a bar code or radio- frequency identification ("RFI D") reader, to obtain information that is usable to determine so- called "electro-optical calibration data" associated with the lighting unit. Once the electro- optical calibration data associated with the lighting unit is determined, it may be used, e.g., by a controller associated with the luminaire, to energize one or more light sources of the lighting unit in a predetermined manner, e.g., compensated so that light emitted by the lighting unit will appear uniform with light emitted by other lighting units installed in the luminaire.

[0007] Generally, in one aspect, a method of configuring a luminaire that includes a plurality of lighting units may include: determining, based on information read from an information provision unit disposed on an outer surface of a particular lighting unit of the plurality of lighting units, electro-optical calibration data associated with the particular lighting unit;

identifying a luminaire address within the luminaire at which the lighting unit is installed or is to be installed; and storing, in a database accessible to a controller of the luminaire, an association between the luminaire address and the electro-optical calibration data associated with the particular lighting unit.

[0008] In some embodiments, the method may further include causing one or more light sources of the particular lighting unit to be energized in a manner selected based at least in part on the electro-optical calibration data associated with the particular lighting unit. In some versions, the method may further include receiving a command to cause the plurality of lighting units to emit light having a selected lighting characteristic. In some versions, causing the one or more light sources of the particular lighting unit to emit light may include energizing the one or more light sources of the particular lighting unit in a manner selected to compensate for the electro-optical calibration data so that the one or more light sources emit light with the selected lighting characteristic. In some versions, the causing may include transmitting, to the luminaire address, one or more lighting control commands selected based at least in part on the electro-optical calibration data for the particular lighting unit.

[0009] In some embodiments, the information provision unit may include at least one of a bar code and a quick response code disposed on the outer surface of the particular lighting unit. In some embodiments, the information provision unit may include at least one of a radio frequency identification transmitter and a near field communication transmitter disposed on the outer surface of the particular lighting unit. In some embodiments, determining the electro-optical calibration data may include matching the information read from the

information provision unit to a database record associated with the particular lighting unit. In some embodiments, the database record may include the electro-optical calibration data associated with the particular lighting unit.

[0010] In some embodiments, determining the electro-optical calibration data may include extracting the electro-optical calibration data directly from the information read from the information provision unit. In some embodiments, the method may further include: testing the particular lighting unit to determine its electro-optical calibration data; and configuring the information provision unit to provide information that is usable to determine the electro- optical calibration data associated with the particular lighting unit. In some versions, the method may further include adhering the information provision unit to the outer surface of the particular lighting unit.

[0011] I n another aspect, a luminaire may include: controller; a bus coupled to the controller; a plurality of lighting units coupled to the bus; and at least one information provision unit disposed on an outer surface of at least one lighting unit of the plurality of lighting units. I n various embodiments, the controller may be configured to: determine, based on information read from the at least one information provision unit, electro-optical calibration data associated with the at least one lighting unit; and cause one or more light sources of the at least one lighting unit to be energized in a manner selected based at least in part on the electro-optical calibration data associated with the at least one lighting unit. I n various embodiments, the controller may be configured to perform additional operations and methods, such as those described above.

[0012] As used herein for purposes of the present disclosure, the term "LED" should be understood to include any electroluminescent diode or other type of carrier injection/junction- based system that is capable of generating radiation in response to an electric signal. Thus, the term LED includes, but is not limited to, various semiconductor-based structures that emit light in response to current, light emitting polymers, organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs), electroluminescent strips, and the like. In particular, the term LED refers to light emitting diodes of all types (including semi-conductor and organic light emitting diodes) that may be configured to generate radiation in one or more of the infrared spectrum, ultraviolet spectrum, and various portions of the visible spectrum (generally including radiation wavelengths from approximately 400 nanometers to approximately 700 nanometers). Some examples of LEDs include, but are not limited to, various types of infrared LEDs, ultraviolet LEDs, red LEDs, blue LEDs, green LEDs, yellow LEDs, amber LEDs, orange LEDs, and white LEDs (discussed further below). It also should be appreciated that LEDs may be configured and/or controlled to generate radiation having various bandwidths (e.g., full widths at half maximum, or FWHM) for a given spectrum (e.g., narrow bandwidth, broad bandwidth), and a variety of dominant wavelengths within a given general color categorization.

[0013] For example, one implementation of an LED configured to generate essentially white light (e.g., a white LED) may include a number of dies which respectively emit different spectra of electroluminescence that, in combination, mix to form essentially white light. In another implementation, a white light LED may be associated with a phosphor material that converts electroluminescence having a first spectrum to a different second spectrum. I n one example of this implementation, electroluminescence having a relatively short wavelength and narrow bandwidth spectrum "pumps" the phosphor material, which in turn radiates longer wavelength radiation having a somewhat broader spectrum.

[0014] It should also be understood that the term LED does not limit the physical and/or electrical package type of an LED. For example, as discussed above, an LED may refer to a single light emitting device having multiple dies that are configured to respectively emit different spectra of radiation (e.g., that may or may not be individually controllable). Also, an LED may be associated with a phosphor that is considered as an integral part of the LED (e.g., some types of white LEDs). In general, the term LED may refer to packaged LEDs, non-packaged LEDs, surface mount LEDs, chip-on-board LEDs, T-package mount LEDs, radial package LEDs, power package LEDs, LEDs including some type of encasement and/or optical element (e.g., a diffusing lens), etc.

[0015] The term "light source" should be understood to refer to any one or more of a variety of radiation sources, including, but not limited to, LED-based sources (including one or more LEDs as defined above), incandescent sources (e.g., filament lamps, halogen lamps), fluorescent sources, phosphorescent sources, high-intensity discharge sources (e.g., sodium vapor, mercury vapor, and metal halide lamps), lasers, other types of electroluminescent sources, pyro-luminescent sources (e.g., flames), candle-luminescent sources (e.g., gas mantles, carbon arc radiation sources), photo-luminescent sources (e.g., gaseous discharge sources), cathode luminescent sources using electronic satiation, galvano-luminescent sources, crystallo- luminescent sources, kine-luminescent sources, thermo-luminescent sources, triboluminescent sources, sonoluminescent sources, radioluminescent sources, and luminescent polymers. [0016] A given light source may be configured to generate electromagnetic radiation within the visible spectrum, outside the visible spectrum, or a combination of both. Hence, the terms "light" and "radiation" are used interchangeably herein. Additionally, a light source may include as an integral component one or more filters (e.g., color filters), lenses, or other optical components. Also, it should be understood that light sources may be configured for a variety of applications, including, but not limited to, indication, display, and/or illumination. An

"illumination source" is a light source that is particularly configured to generate radiation having a sufficient intensity to effectively illuminate an interior or exterior space. I n this context, "sufficient intensity" refers to sufficient radiant power in the visible spectrum generated in the space or environment (the unit "lumens" often is employed to represent the total light output from a light source in all directions, in terms of radiant power or "luminous flux") to provide ambient illumination (i.e., light that may be perceived indirectly and that may be, for example, reflected off of one or more of a variety of intervening surfaces before being perceived in whole or in part).

[0017] The term "spectrum" should be understood to refer to any one or more frequencies (or wavelengths) of radiation produced by one or more light sources. Accordingly, the term "spectrum" refers to frequencies (or wavelengths) not only in the visible range, but also frequencies (or wavelengths) in the infrared, ultraviolet, and other areas of the overall electromagnetic spectrum. Also, a given spectrum may have a relatively narrow bandwidth (e.g., a FWHM having essentially few frequency or wavelength components) or a relatively wide bandwidth (several frequency or wavelength components having various relative strengths). It should also be appreciated that a given spectrum may be the result of a mixing of two or more other spectra (e.g., mixing radiation respectively emitted from multiple light sources).

[0018] For purposes of this disclosure, the term "color" is used interchangeably with the term "spectrum." However, the term "color" generally is used to refer primarily to a property of radiation that is perceivable by an observer (although this usage is not intended to limit the scope of this term). Accordingly, the terms "different colors" implicitly refer to multiple spectra having different wavelength components and/or bandwidths. It also should be appreciated that the term "color" may be used in connection with both white and non-white light. [0019] The term "color temperature" generally is used herein in connection with white light, although this usage is not intended to limit the scope of this term. Color temperature essentially refers to a particular color content or shade (e.g., reddish, bluish) of white light. The color temperature of a given radiation sample conventionally is characterized according to the temperature in degrees Kelvin (K) of a black body radiator that radiates essentially the same spectrum as the radiation sample in question. Black body radiator color temperatures generally fall within a range of approximately 700 degrees K (typically considered the first visible to the human eye) to over 10,000 degrees K; white light generally is perceived at color temperatures above 1500-2000 degrees K.

[0020] Lower color temperatures generally indicate white light having a more significant red component or a "warmer feel," while higher color temperatures generally indicate white light having a more significant blue component or a "cooler feel." By way of example, fire has a color temperature of approximately 1,800 degrees K, a conventional incandescent bulb has a color temperature of approximately 2848 degrees K, early morning daylight has a color temperature of approximately 3,000 degrees K, and overcast midday skies have a color temperature of approximately 10,000 degrees K. A color image viewed under white light having a color temperature of approximately 3,000 degree K has a relatively reddish tone, whereas the same color image viewed under white light having a color temperature of approximately 10,000 degrees K has a relatively bluish tone.

[0021] The term "luminaire" or "lighting fixture" is used herein to refer to an

implementation or arrangement of one or more lighting units in a particular form factor, assembly, or package. The term "lighting unit" is used herein to refer to an apparatus including one or more light sources of same or different types. A given lighting unit may have any one of a variety of mounting arrangements for the light source(s), enclosure/housing arrangements and shapes, and/or electrical and mechanical connection configurations. Additionally, a given lighting unit optionally may be associated with (e.g., include, be coupled to and/or packaged together with) various other components (e.g., control circuitry) relating to the operation of the light source(s). An "LED-based lighting unit" refers to a lighting unit that includes one or more LED-based light sources as discussed above, alone or in combination with other non LED-based light sources. A "multi-channel" lighting unit refers to an LED-based or non LED-based lighting unit that includes at least two light sources configured to respectively generate different spectrums of radiation, wherein each different source spectrum may be referred to as a "channel" of the multi-channel lighting unit.

[0022] The term "controller" is used herein generally to describe various apparatus relating to the operation of one or more light sources. A controller can be implemented in numerous ways (e.g., such as with dedicated hardware) to perform various functions discussed herein. A "processor" is one example of a controller which employs one or more microprocessors that may be programmed using software (e.g., microcode) to perform various functions discussed herein. A controller may be implemented with or without employing a processor, and also may be implemented as a combination of dedicated hardware to perform some functions and a processor (e.g., one or more programmed microprocessors and associated circuitry) to perform other functions. Examples of controller components that may be employed in various embodiments of the present disclosure include, but are not limited to, conventional microprocessors, application specific integrated circuits (ASICs), and field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs).

[0023] I n various implementations, a processor or controller may be associated with one or more storage media (generically referred to herein as "memory," e.g., volatile and non-volatile computer memory such as RAM, PROM, EPROM, and EEPROM, floppy disks, compact disks, optical disks, magnetic tape, etc.). In some implementations, the storage media may be encoded with one or more programs that, when executed on one or more processors and/or controllers, perform at least some of the functions discussed herein. Various storage media may be fixed within a processor or controller or may be transportable, such that the one or more programs stored thereon can be loaded into a processor or controller so as to implement various aspects of the present invention discussed herein. The terms "program" or "computer program" are used herein in a generic sense to refer to any type of computer code (e.g., software or microcode) that can be employed to program one or more processors or controllers. [0024] The term "addressable" is used herein to refer to a device (e.g., a light source in general, a lighting unit or fixture, a controller or processor associated with one or more light sources or lighting units, other non-lighting related devices, etc.) that is configured to receive information (e.g., data) intended for multiple devices, including itself, and to selectively respond to particular information intended for it. The term "addressable" often is used in connection with a networked environment (or a "network," discussed further below), in which multiple devices are coupled together via some communications medium or media.

[0025] I n one network implementation, one or more devices coupled to a network may serve as a controller for one or more other devices coupled to the network (e.g., in a master/slave relationship). I n another implementation, a networked environment may include one or more dedicated controllers that are configured to control one or more of the devices coupled to the network. Generally, multiple devices coupled to the network each may have access to data that is present on the communications medium or media; however, a given device may be "addressable" in that it is configured to selectively exchange data with (i.e., receive data from and/or transmit data to) the network, based, for example, on one or more particular identifiers (e.g., "addresses") assigned to it.

[0026] The term "network" as used herein refers to any interconnection of two or more devices (including controllers or processors) that facilitates the transport of information (e.g., for device control, data storage, data exchange, etc.) between any two or more devices and/or among multiple devices coupled to the network. As should be readily appreciated, various implementations of networks suitable for interconnecting multiple devices may include any of a variety of network topologies and employ any of a variety of communication protocols.

Additionally, in various networks according to the present disclosure, any one connection between two devices may represent a dedicated connection between the two systems, or alternatively a non-dedicated connection. In addition to carrying information intended for the two devices, such a non-dedicated connection may carry information not necessarily intended for either of the two devices (e.g., an open network connection). Furthermore, it should be readily appreciated that various networks of devices as discussed herein may employ one or more wireless, wire/cable, and/or fiber optic links to facilitate information transport throughout the network.

[0027] The term "user interface" as used herein refers to an interface between a human user or operator and one or more devices that enables communication between the user and the device(s). Examples of user interfaces that may be employed in various implementations of the present disclosure include, but are not limited to, switches, potentiometers, buttons, dials, sliders, a mouse, keyboard, keypad, various types of game controllers (e.g., joysticks), track balls, display screens, various types of graphical user interfaces (GUIs), touch screens, microphones and other types of sensors that may receive some form of human-generated stimulus and generate a signal in response thereto.

[0028] The term "electro-optical calibration data" as used herein refers to data ascertained about light emission characteristics of a lighting unit, e.g., by testing the lighting unit at the factory, that can be used to selectively energize one or more light sources of the lighting unit to emit light having desired characteristics. I n one embodiment, the electro-optical calibration data of a lighting unit may include brightness and chromaticity. For example, measures of brightness and chromaticity maybe determined using the color gamut based on the CIE XYZ color space and as a function of the three tristimulus values X, Y, and Z. I n other embodiments, electro-optical calibration data may include wavelengths or color corrected temperatures, light output (intensity or luminous flux), and forward voltage/efficacy (Vf or lumens per Watt). In some implementations, electro-optical calibration data may be used to compensate for abnormal performance characteristics of the lighting unit that result from, for instance, lenient manufacturing tolerances. For example, suppose post-manufacture testing reveals that light emitted by a particular lighting unit tends to be relatively dim. For example if the intensity or luminous flux of that lighting unit is lower than the intensity or the luminous flux of other lighting units. Electro-optical calibration data associated with the lighting unit may be updated to indicate this fact. Thereafter, when a controller energizes the lighting unit, the controller may take the electro-optical calibration data into account and provide extra power to the lighting unit to compensate for its inherent tendency to burn dimly. [0029] It should be appreciated that all combinations of the foregoing concepts and additional concepts discussed in greater detail below (provided such concepts are not mutually inconsistent) are contemplated as being part of the inventive subject matter disclosed herein. In particular, all combinations of claimed subject matter appearing at the end of this disclosure are contemplated as being part of the inventive subject matter disclosed herein. It should also be appreciated that terminology explicitly employed herein that also may appear in any disclosure incorporated by reference should be accorded a meaning most consistent with the particular concepts disclosed herein.

Brief Description of the Drawings

[0030] I n the drawings, like reference characters generally refer to the same parts throughout the different views. Also, the drawings are not necessarily to scale, emphasis instead generally being placed upon illustrating the principles of the invention.

[0031] Fig. 1 illustrates an example luminaire and installed lighting units configured with selected aspects of the present disclosure, in accordance with various embodiments.

[0032] Figs. 2A and B depict examples of placement of information provision units on lighting units, in accordance with various embodiments.

[0033] Fig. 3 depicts an example method for configuring a luminaire with lighting units using information provision units as described herein, in accordance with various embodiments.

Detailed Description

[0034] Luminaires may come in various forms and topologies, and may accept one or more lighting units, e.g., depending on a number of sockets or other similar lighting unit connectors a given luminaire has. While daisy chain topology may be employed, if one lighting unit becomes inoperative, it may no longer be able to pass commands and/or power further down the string, causing multiple otherwise-functional lighting units to also go out. Additionally, if multiple lighting units installed in a luminaire are heterogeneous, then the light they collectively emit will not likely be uniform. Even if the lighting units are seemingly identical, unless they are precisely calibrated (which can be expensive), they may collectively emit light that is perceptively non-uniform.

[0035] Accordingly, Applicants have recognized and appreciated that it would be beneficial to provide a string-style luminaire and/or lighting unit that will facilitate continued operation by other lighting units when a particular lighting unit is rendered inoperative. Additionally, Applicants have recognized and appreciated that it would be beneficial to provide a luminaire and/or lighting unit that facilitates installation of the lighting unit in the luminaire such that the lighting unit may be energized to emit light that is uniform with light emitted by other lighting units installed in the same luminaire. In view of the foregoing, various embodiments and implementations of the present invention are directed to registering lighting units installed in a luminaire with their associated electro-optical calibration data.

[0036] Referring to Fig. 1, in one embodiment, a luminaire 100 may include a controller 102 coupled with a plurality of lighting units 104a-e (sometimes referred to as "lighting nodes", and referred to generically as "lighting units 104") via a bus 106. In some embodiments, controller 102 may be a so-called "power/data supply," though this is not required. Each of the plurality of lighting units 104a-e may include one or more light sources 108 (only one is reference for the sake of clarity). Light sources 108 in this example are LEDs, but other embodiments may include other types of light sources, such as halogen lamps, fluorescent lamps, incandescent lamps, and so forth. In various embodiments, luminaire 100 may have various form factors. For example, luminaire 100 may be a flexible string or ribbon of lighting units 104, wherein bus 106 is enclosed in an elongate and flexible rubber or plastic casing. Such "strings" of lighting units (often called "lighting nodes" in this context) may be used, for instance, in two- or three- dimensional configurations, e.g., as architectural accents, perimeter lighting, large scale signage, and/or building-covering video displays.

[0037] Plurality of lighting units 104a-e also include, on their respective outer surfaces at locations that would not block emitted light, a plurality of information provision units llOa-e. In the particular embodiment shown in Fig. 1, information provision units llOa-e are quick response ("QR") codes. However, other information provision technologies may be employed in addition to or instead of QR codes, including but not limited to other types of bar codes, radio freq uency identification ("RFI D") tags, near-field communication ("NFC") tags, and so forth. In some embodiments, information provision units llOa-e may be stickers that are generated and then adhered to outer surfaces of lighting units 104a-e. In other embodiments, information provision units llOa-e may be secured to outer surfaces of lighting units 104a-e using other methods, such as magnets, hook-and-look fasteners, and so forth. I n some embodiments, information provision units llOa-e may be printed or etched directly onto the surfaces of lighting units 104a-e.

[0038] I nformation provision units llOa-e may carry various types of information. For example, first information provision unit 110a may carry a unique identifier of first lighting unit 104a. I n some embodiments, this unique identifier may enable controller 102 to determine electro-optical calibration data associated with lighting unit 104a. For example, in Fig. 1, controller 102 is in communication with a database 118. Database 118 may store records about lighting units 104a-e. These records may include, for instance, an association between a unique identifier of a lighting unit 104 (e.g., a MAC address or similar) and electro-optical calibration data associated with that lighting unit 104. By reading a unique identifier associated with a lighting unit 104 from a respective information provision unit 110, controller 102 may be able to match, e.g., in database 118, that unique identifier with electro-optical calibration data associated with the respective lighting unit 104. Maintaining a database 118 of lighting unit records may have other benefits as well, such as enabling tracking of lighting units 104 through manufacturing, as well as enabling storage of lighting unit history, which may be useful, for instance, for statistical purposes. In other embodiments, information provision units 110 may themselves carry electro-optical calibration data. For example, a QR code, if large enough, may carry electro-optical calibration data of its respective lighting unit 104.

[0039] Controller 102 may obtain information carried by information provision units 110 in various ways. I n some embodiments, a reader 120 may be in wired or wireless communication with controller 102, e.g., via a communication interface 103 that is operably coupled with controller 102. Reader 120 may be configured to read information provision units 110. Reader 120 may take various forms, depending on the type of technology employed by information provision units 110. If information provision units 110 are QR codes or bar codes, reader 120 may be an optical reader such as a smart phone camera. If information provision units 110 are RFID or NFC tags, reader may be an RFI D or NFC reader. I n some embodiments, including the embodiment depicted in Fig. 1, reader 120 may be a standalone device. In other embodiments, reader 120 may be an integral part of a computing device, including but not limited to a smart phone, a tablet computer, a laptop computer, a smart watch, smart glasses, and so forth.

[0040] As noted above, electro-optical calibration data of a lighting unit 104 may be used, e.g., by controller 102, when energizing one or more light sources 108 of the lighting unit (104). Thus, for instance, controller 102 may compensate for any abnormalities or other inherent traits of, say, lighting unit 104a, that would cause it to emit light having one or more realized lighting properties that deviate from one or more expected lighting properties. If electro- optical calibration data carried by information provision unit 110a reveals that lighting unit 104a tends to burn too brightly, controller 102 may compensate by providing less power to lighting unit 104a than it provides to other lighting units. I n other examples, the electro-optical calibration data carried by information provision unit 110a may indicate that lighting unit 104a has a color point inconsistent with the lighting units adjacent to it for example 104b or 104c. The controller 102 may compensate by sending a control signal to lighting unit 104a to adjust the color point to be consistent with the adjacent lighting units.

[0041] I n various embodiments, lighting units 104 may be installed in luminaire 100 in a bus topology, e.g., to ameliorate the shortcomings of daisy chain topology mentioned in the background. To facilitate the bus topology depicted in Fig. 1 (which may req uire each lighting unit 104 to be individually addressable), controller 102 may be configured to determine a "luminaire address" (e.g., a socket address, or a bus address, e.g., "bus location A," "bus location B," etc.) at which each lighting unit 104 is installed within luminaire 100. For example, each luminaire location (e.g., socket), labeled 122a-e, may have its own luminaire address that may be uniq ue within luminaire 100. Controller 102 may maintain, e.g., in database 118, an association between a uniq ue identifier of each lighting unit 104 and the location 122/luminaire address in which the particular lighting unit 104 in installed or is to be installed.

[0042] For example, a technician installing lighting units 104 into luminaire 100, e.g., at the factory, may operate reader 120 or a similar device to input a location 122/luminaire address at which a lighting unit 104 is being installed or is going to be installed. The technician may also operate reader 120 to read an information provision unit 110 of the lighting unit 104 to be installed or that has been installed, e.g., to determine its unique identifier and/or electro- optical calibration data. Reader 120 may make this information available to controller 102, e.g., by storing the information in database 118. For example, reader 120 and/or controller 102 may store, e.g., in database 118, an association between a location 122/luminaire address at which a lighting unit 104 is installed and electro-optical calibration data for that lighting unit 104. That way, controller 102 may transmit, to the luminaire address of the location 122 at which the new lighting unit 104 is installed, one or more lighting control commands that the controller 102 selects based at least in part on the electro-optical calibration data for that particular lighting unit 104.

[0043] I n some embodiments, the technician may manually provide the luminaire address for the location 122 at which each lighting unit 104 is being installed as information provision units 110 of those lighting units 104 are being read. In other embodiments, each location 122 of luminaire 100 may itself include indicia that identifies the particular location's luminaire address. For example, each location 122 could be provided with a bar code or QR code that identifies its luminaire address. A technician could use reader 120 to read that bar code or QR code to identify the luminaire address, and read information provision unit 110 of the lighting unit 104 to be installed at that location. As described above, reader 120 and/or controller 102 may be configured to create various associations (e.g., in database 118) between the lighting unit 104 and the luminaire address of the location 122 at which the lighting unit 104 is installed.

[0044] Figs. 2A and 2B depict examples of how an information provision unit 210 may be applied to a surface of a lighting unit 204, in accordance with various embodiments. In Fig. 2A, information provision unit 210 is relatively small, and takes the form of a sticker that is adhered (e.g., using various adhesives) to a back of lighting unit 204 so that it blocks as little as possible of a door 230 that may be removed, for instance, to replace one or more internal light sources of lighting unit 204. In Fig. 2B, by contrast, information provision unit 210 is relatively large. I n some cases, providing a relatively large information provision unit 210, particularly when it is a bar code or a QR code (as shown), may facilitate storage of more information than a smaller unit. This additional information may include, for instance, electro-optical calibration data, which smaller information provision units 210 may be unable to store.

[0045] Fig. 3 depicts an example method 300 for configuring a lighting (e.g., 100) with lighting units (e.g., 104, 204), in accordance with various embodiments. At block 302, a luminaire address within the luminaire at which a lighting unit is to be installed or has been installed may be identified. For example, a technician operating a portable computing device that includes a reader 120 may manually input a luminaire address within the lighting luminaire at which a lighting unit is to be installed or has been installed. Additionally or alternatively, the technician may use reader 120 to read a bar code, QR code, or other similar information provision unit at or near the location (e.g., 122) of the luminaire to identify the luminaire address.

[0046] However the luminaire address within the luminaire is identified, at block 304, information may be read from an information provision unit (e.g., 110, 210) of the lighting unit that has been installed or is to be installed. For example, the technician may use reader 120 to read the information provision unit. At block 306, it may be determined, e.g., by logic within or associated with reader 120 (e.g., one or more processors of a portable computing device of which reader is part) whether information read at block 304 includes electro-optical calibration data ("E-0 CALI B. DATA" in Fig. 3). If the answer at block 306 is yes, then method 300 may proceed to block 308, and an association between the luminaire address within the luminaire that was obtained at block 302 and the electro-optical calibration data may be stored, e.g., in database 118 by reader 120 and/or controller 102.

[0047] If the answer at block 306 is no, however, then information read from the

information provision unit at block 304 may include a unique identifier associated with the lighting unit that has been installed or is to be installed. In that case, method 300 may proceed to block 310, at which the information read from the information provision unit may be matched to a database (e.g., of database 118 or another, un-depicted database) record associated with the particular lighting unit. In various embodiments, the database record may include the electro-optical calibration data associated with the particular lighting unit, e.g., indexed by the lighting unit's unique identifier. Once this electro-optical calibration data is obtained from the database, method 300 may proceed to block 308, which was described previously.

[0048] When a lighting unit in a luminaire is replaced, the replacement lighting unit may be added in a similar fashion. A technician may operate a computing device to indicate a particular luminaire address at which the replacement lighting unit is to be installed. The technician may then operate reader 120 to read an information provision unit associated with that replacement lighting unit. As above, if the information provision unit only includes a unique identifier of the replacement lighting unit, then a database (e.g., 118) may be consulted to determine electro-optical calibration data for the replacement lighting unit. If the information provision unit affixed to the outer surface of the replacement lighting unit contains its electro-optical calibration data, then there may be no need to consult database 118.

[0049] Once the luminaire is assembled and installed for use, at block 312, a command may be received to cause a plurality of lighting units (e.g., 104a-e) installed in the luminaire to emit light having a particular lighting characteristic, such as a particular color or hue. At block 314, the luminaire (e.g., by way of controller 102) may cause one or more light sources of a particular lighting unit to be energized in a manner selected based at least in part on electro- optical calibration data associated with the particular lighting unit. Thus, for instance, if light to be collectively emitted by a plurality of lighting units is supposed to be a particular brightness, and a particular lighting unit of the plurality tends to burn dimly, that lighting unit may be provided, e.g., by controller 102, with more energy than other lighting units to compensate.

[0050] I n some embodiments, a lighting unit's information provision unit may be secured to its surface early on during manufacture, so that at each stage of manufacture, the lighting unit can be tracked, and a database record updated with the tracked information. When the lighting unit is complete, it may tested (e.g., by energizing it and measuring aspects of the light it outputs) to determine its electro-optical calibration data. As with other stages of

manufacture, when the lighting unit is tested, its information provision unit may be read. At the end of manufacture/testing of a plurality of lighting units, a database (e.g., 118) will have been formed, with a record for each lighting unit that associates the lighting unit's unique identifier (e.g., which may be carried in its information provision unit) with its electro-optical calibration data. As discussed above, these records may then be used later when installing the lighting units into luminaires.

[0051] While several inventive embodiments have been described and illustrated herein, those of ordinary skill in the art will readily envision a variety of other means and/or structures for performing the function and/or obtaining the results and/or one or more of the advantages described herein, and each of such variations and/or modifications is deemed to be within the scope of the inventive embodiments described herein. More generally, those skilled in the art will readily appreciate that all parameters, dimensions, materials, and configurations described herein are meant to be exemplary and that the actual parameters, dimensions, materials, and/or configurations will depend upon the specific application or applications for which the inventive teachings is/are used. Those skilled in the art will recognize, or be able to ascertain using no more than routine experimentation, many equivalents to the specific inventive embodiments described herein. It is, therefore, to be understood that the foregoing embodiments are presented by way of example only and that, within the scope of the appended claims and equivalents thereto, inventive embodiments may be practiced otherwise than as specifically described and claimed. Inventive embodiments of the present disclosure are directed to each individual feature, system, article, material, kit, and/or method described herein. In addition, any combination of two or more such features, systems, articles, materials, kits, and/or methods, if such features, systems, articles, materials, kits, and/or methods are not mutually inconsistent, is included within the inventive scope of the present disclosure.

[0052] All definitions, as defined and used herein, should be understood to control over dictionary definitions, definitions in documents incorporated by reference, and/or ordinary meanings of the defined terms.

[0053] The indefinite articles "a" and "an," as used herein in the specification and in the claims, unless clearly indicated to the contrary, should be understood to mean "at least one."

[0054] The phrase "and/or," as used herein in the specification and in the claims, should be understood to mean "either or both" of the elements so conjoined, i.e., elements that are conjunctively present in some cases and disjunctively present in other cases. Multiple elements listed with "and/or" should be construed in the same fashion, i.e., "one or more" of the elements so conjoined. Other elements may optionally be present other than the elements specifically identified by the "and/or" clause, whether related or unrelated to those elements specifically identified. Thus, as a non-limiting example, a reference to "A and/or B", when used in conjunction with open-ended language such as "comprising" can refer, in one embodiment, to A only (optionally including elements other than B); in another embodiment, to B only (optionally including elements other than A); in yet another embodiment, to both A and B (optionally including other elements); etc.

[0055] As used herein in the specification and in the claims, "or" should be understood to have the same meaning as "and/or" as defined above. For example, when separating items in a list, "or" or "and/or" shall be interpreted as being inclusive, i.e., the inclusion of at least one, but also including more than one, of a number or list of elements, and, optionally, additional unlisted items. Only terms clearly indicated to the contrary, such as "only one of" or "exactly one of," or, when used in the claims, "consisting of," will refer to the inclusion of exactly one element of a number or list of elements. In general, the term "or" as used herein shall only be interpreted as indicating exclusive alternatives (i.e. "one or the other but not both") when preceded by terms of exclusivity, such as "either," "one of," "only one of," or "exactly one of." "Consisting essentially of," when used in the claims, shall have its ordinary meaning as used in the field of patent law.

[0056] As used herein in the specification and in the claims, the phrase "at least one," in reference to a list of one or more elements, should be understood to mean at least one element selected from any one or more of the elements in the list of elements, but not necessarily including at least one of each and every element specifically listed within the list of elements and not excluding any combinations of elements in the list of elements. This definition also allows that elements may optionally be present other than the elements specifically identified within the list of elements to which the phrase "at least one" refers, whether related or unrelated to those elements specifically identified. Thus, as a non-limiting example, "at least one of A and B" (or, equivalently, "at least one of A or B," or, equivalently "at least one of A and/or B") can refer, in one embodiment, to at least one, optionally including more than one, A, with no B present (and optionally including elements other than B); in another embodiment, to at least one, optionally including more than one, B, with no A present (and optionally including elements other than A); in yet another embodiment, to at least one, optionally including more than one, A, and at least one, optionally including more than one, B (and optionally including other elements); etc.

[0057] It should also be understood that, unless clearly indicated to the contrary, in any methods claimed herein that include more than one step or act, the order of the steps or acts of the method is not necessarily limited to the order in which the steps or acts of the method are recited.

[0058] In the claims, as well as in the specification above, all transitional phrases such as "comprising," "including," "carrying," "having," "containing," "involving," "holding," "composed of," and the like are to be understood to be open-ended, i.e., to mean including but not limited to. Only the transitional phrases "consisting of" and "consisting essentially of" shall be closed or semi-closed transitional phrases, respectively, as set forth in the United States Patent Office Manual of Patent Examining Procedures, Section 2111.03. It should be understood that certain expressions and reference signs used in the claims pursuant to Rule 6.2(b) of the Patent Cooperation Treaty ("PCT") do not limit the scope

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Classifications
International ClassificationH05B33/08, H05B37/02
Cooperative ClassificationH05B37/0245
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