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Publication numberUS772551 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication date18 Oct 1904
Filing date14 Apr 1904
Priority date14 Apr 1904
Publication numberUS 772551 A, US 772551A, US-A-772551, US772551 A, US772551A
InventorsAnders Akeson
Original AssigneeAtlas Light & Power Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Carbureter.
US 772551 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

UNITED STATES Patented october 1s, 1904Y PATENT l OEEICE.

ANDERS AKESON, OF BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS, ASSIGNOR TO THE ATLAS LIGHT & POWER COMPANY, OFv BOSTON, MASSACHU- SETTS.

oAmanuari'reFi.

SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 772,551, dated October 18, 1904.

Application filed April 14, 1904.

To all whom it may concern/:I

Be it known that I, ANDERS AKEsoN, a citizen of the United States, residing atl the city of Boston, in the county of Suiolk and State of Massachusetts, have invented certain vnew and useful Improvements in Carbureters, of Which the following is a specification.

My invention relates to the classof carbureters and is an'apparatus arranged to receive from a proper source compressed air and to scribed, and specificallyset forth in the claims.

In the accompanying sheet of draWings,Fig ure 1 represents a view of my improved carbureter as seen partly in elevation and partly in central vertical section. Fig. 2 is a view in elevation of the wire basket containing sponges and the means of suspending it within the carbureter. Fig. 3 is a perspective view of the mass of spongesand wicking secured together by wires and used in generating the carbureted air from the naphtha or gasolene in the lower part of the generator.

Like numerals indicate like parts in the different views of the drawings.

In Fig. 1 is shown a carbureter connected by a pipe. The carbureter consists of a metallic receptacle of proper dimensions, preferably cylindrical in shape, and comprising the tubular portion 1, the dome 2,'and the bottom 3, ,the same being provided with flanges and riveted together, as plainly illustrated in Fig. 1. A series of Lshaped brackets 4 are secured to the tubular portion 1, and on the inner side thereof, by means of rivets 5 or otherwise, and upon these brackets rests a circular piece 6, of Wire-gauze, having a central opening or aperture., lAcollar 7, having a Serial No. 203,202. (No model.)

- vertical annular flange, lies upon the piece of wire-gauze 6, and bolts 8 pass through the collar 7, wiregauze 6, and brackets 4, and so hold the said wire-gauze securely in position.

This piece 6, of wire-gauze, constitutes a hori- Zontal partition and is located above the bottom 3 of the carbureter, but parallel to it. It thus divides the carbureter into two compartments, the lower one of which contains a suitable quantity of naphtha, gasolene, or other fluid hydrocarbon, as seen in Fig. 1. A T- shaped coupling 9 has the 'three pipes 10, 11, and 12 connected thereto. The pipe 11 extends through a boss 13, which is perforated to allow its passage, andan elbow-coupling 1A lits on the inner end of the pipe 11. A downwardly-extending pipe 15 has its upper end fitted in the elbow-coupling 111, and its lower end is submerged, as shown in Fig. 1.

N aphtha, gasolene, or other suitable iiuid hydrocarbon is fed in proper quantities and at proper intervals through the pipe 12 and iiows into the lower compartment of the carbureter through the pipes 11 and 15.

Compressed air from any suitable source flows through the Vpipes 10, 11, and 15 under pressure.

On the top of the partition 6 of wire-gauze of the Wire-gauze partition 6, as'shownin Fig. 1) and dip into the liquid hydrocarbon. Under the dome 2 in the upper compartment of the carbureter is suspended a wire basket or cage 20, filled with pieces 21 of dry sponge. This wire basket is shown in perspective in Fig. 2, where it is seen that it has a circular slightly-dished cover 22, furnished with loops or eyes on its edge, to which the Wires are fastened. A tube 23, whose exterior o surface is screw-threaded, is mounted on the cover 22 and passes through said cover. A nut 24, engaging with the tube 23 on the outside thereof, serves to draw the upper surface of the cover Q2 up into snug contact with the under surface of the dome Q, as shown in Fig. 1.

A pressure-gage 25 is mounted as usual on a pipe 26, which extends up from the pressure-gage chamber 27. A valve 28 is provided for tlie pipe 26. The chamber 27 has an annular flange 29 and is fastened by bolts 30, through the flanges 29, to the exterior of the dome 2. There is a pipe connection from the carbureter to the gasometer consisting of thepipes 31, 32, 33, 34,and 35, the elbow-couplings 38 and 39, and the filtering-chamber 41. A valve 42 is between the pipes 31 and 3Q.

Having thus described the parts and construction of my improved gas-machine, I will now explain its mechanical principle and mode of operation.

In order to obtain a flow of carbureted air foi-illuminating purposes, itis necessary that there should be atank or supply of compressed air entering through the pipe 10 with sufficient pressure to force it through the several liltering-compartments and pipes and to discharge from the gasometer. (Not shown.) In this passage of the compressed air through this machine it is mingled and charged to its utmost capacity with hydrocarbon vapor, and is thus changed into carbureted air capable of giving a strong' and intense light. Instead, however, of using compressed air for this purpose and providing means of pressing and discharging the same (which means are not shown in the drawings, but are understood to be any of the well-known means for that purpose) itis obvious that common illuminating-gas from the street-main may enter under its usual pressure into the pipe 10 and in traversing the several compartments of my machine and the pipes thereof may be carbureted or highly en riched in carbon, and may therefore burn with greater intensity and increased candle-power. The carbureting compound is any suitable fluid hydrocarbon, preferably a petroleum product, such as naphtha or gasolene, which is fed through the pipe 12 by any suitable means (not shown) and Hows into the tank 1 to a considerable depth, as illustrated in Fig. 1. This liquid and the compressed air are discharged into the lower compartment, as shown, by the submerged pipe 15, so that the compressed air bubbles up through said liquid and is saturated with it. The loose ends of the many pieces 18 of cotton wicking which, as shown, are dipped or floating in the naphtha or gasolene are completely saturated thereby and convey the same by capillary attraction to the mass of sponge 1G, in which said strands of wicking 18 are embedded, and thus keep saidmass of sponge 16 moist with said liquid hydrocarbon. Thus the compressed air after being' bubbled up through the naphtha or gasolene and becomingcharged therewith passes up through this moist mass of sponge 1G into the upper compartment of the carlmreter and in so passing is charged to its utmost capacity with the hydrocarbon vapors. This sponge mass is peculiarly adapted to facilitate the volatilization ol the hydrocarbon, as this material is exceedingly porous in its nature, readily absorbing moisture, and dividing and separating it, thus greatly increasing the area of exposure to the air. ln this manner the hydrocarbon is vaporized and effectively changed into an aeri form condition and as such lills the upper compartment of the carbureter; but this vapor, though highly inliammable, requires condensation and much filtration in order to become a suitable illuminant. These results are accomplished in my machine as follows: The only outlet ol the carbureter is thepipe 23; but the vapors must lirst pass through the mass of dry sponges contained in the wire basket or cage Q0. These sponges 21, being full of pores both large and small, strain out from the vapor passing through them any excess of moisture and tend to make the carbureted air not only drier but more finely divided or liner.

I claim as a novel and useful invention and desire to secure by Letters Patentm 1. In a carbureter, the combination of a closed tank divided into two eompartn'ien ts by a screen or perforated partition and adapted to receive and hold in its lower compartment a liquid hydrocarbon and an aeriform lluid under pressure; a layer of sponges upon the screen or partition in the upper compartment; and a mass of wicking connected to and extending down loosely from said layer of sponges with the ends of said wiekings submerged in said liquid hydrocarbon in the lower compartment, substantially as speeilied.

2. In a carbureter, the combination of a receptacle; a mass of sponges supported therein and a mass of wiekings connected to and extending from the mass of sponges, substantially as shown and for the purpose specified.

3. In a carbureter, the combination of a receptacle; a perforated screen or partition therein; a mass of sponges upon said screen or partition; a wire-netting adapted to conline and fasten said mass of sponges upon the screen or partition; and a mass of wickings secured to themass of sponges with their ends hanging loosely therefrom, substantially as specified.

4. In a carbureter, the combination of a earbureter; a horizontal screen or perforated partition mounted therein and having a central ring; a mass of sponge upon said screen or partition; and a mass of wicks connected to said mass of sponge and having their loose ends protruding down through said ring, substantially as specified.

5. In a carbureter, the combination ol a` closed tank; ahorizontal screen or perforated IOO partition mounted therein and .having a central ring; a mass of sponge upon said screen or partition; a wire-netting securing said mass of sponge to the screen or partition; and a mass of wicks held to 'said mass of sponge by said wire-netting and having their loose ends protruding down through said ring, substantially as specified.

6. In a carbureter, the combination of a disk having a central aperture; a tube fitting into said aperture; a basket composed of wirenetting secured to the edge of said disk; and a mass of Sponges contained in said basket, substantially as specified.

7. In a carbureter, the combination of a closed tank having three compartments; a horizontal screen or partition mounted therein and dividing the lowest compartment from the middle compartment; a'supply-pipe entering the lowest compartment and adapted to discharge therein an aeriform fiuid under pressure and a liquid hydrocarbon; a mass of sponge in the middle compartment resting on said screen or partition; a mass of wicks connected tothe mass of sponge and having their loose ends protruding through s'aid screen or partition and extending into said lowest compartment; and an upper compartment in the top of said tank comprising a disk with a central outlet-pipe; a basket of wire-netting attached to the edge of said disk; and a mass of dry sponge contained in said basket, substantially as specified.

8. In a carbureter, the combination of a closed tank having an outlet at its upper end; a mass of Sponges supported in position in or near the bottom of the tank; means adapted to saturate said Sponges with a liquid hydrocarbon; means for supplying said tank with an aeriform fluid under pressure; a wire basket supported-in the upper part of the tank with an interval of space between it andv said mass of saturated Sponges; and a mass of dry sponges contained in said basket, substantially as specified.

9. In 'a carbureter, the combination of a closed tank having a dome with a vertical ap-l erture; a curved disk havinga central screw-- threaded aperture and fitting the central part of the dome on the inner surface thereof; a tube having exterior screw-threads and erigaged thereby with the central apertureof said disk; a basket of wire-netting fastened toV the disk on the edge thereof; a mass of sponge contained in said basket; and a nut fitting upon the outer end of said tube and being in convtact with the exterior surface of said dome at the center thereof, substantially as specified. 10. In a carbureter, ythe combination ofa closed tank having a domewith a central aperture; a curved disk having va central screw-` threaded aperture and fitting the central part of the dome on the inner surface thereof; a tube having exterior screw-threads and engaged thereby with the central'aperture of said disk; a basket of wire-netting fastened to the disk on the edge thereof; a 4mass of sponge contained in said basket; a nut fitting on the outer end of said tube and adapted to hold said disk in snug contact with the inner side of the dome; and a chamber on the exterior of said dome into which said tube opens, l

contained in said basket; a nut tting on the outer end of said tube and adapted to hold said disk in snug contact with the inner surface of the dome; a chamber on the exterior of said dome into which said tube opens; a pressure-gage; and apipe connecting said chamber and pressure-gage, substantially as specified.'

12. In a carbureter, the combination of a closed tank having a dome with -a central aperture; a curved disk having a central screwthreaded aperture and fitting the central part of the dome on the inner surface thereof; a tube having exterior screw-threads and engaged thereby with the central aperture of said disk; a basket of wire-netting fastened to the disk on the edge thereof; a mass of sponge contained in said basket; a nutl fitting on the outer end kof said tube and adapted to hold IOO said disk in snug Contact with the dome; a

chamber on the exterior of said dome into which said tube opens; and an outlet-pipe passing out of said chamber, substantially as specified.

13. In a carbureter, the combination of a closed tank divided by a horizontal screen or perforated partition into two compartments; a supply-pipe adapted to discharge into the lower compartment a liquid hydrocarbon and an aeriform fluid .under pressure; a mass of sponge upon said screen or partition; a mass of wicks connected to the mass of sponge and having their loose ends protruding through said screen`or partition and extending down into ysaid lower compartment; a dome for said carbureter having a central aperture; a wire basket having a coverprovided with a central aperture; a screw-threaded tube fitting the aperture of the saidcover and the said aperture of the dome; a mass of sponge in said basket; a nut on the said tube; a chamber on the exterior of said dome into which said tube opens, a pipe communicating with the chamber of said dome; and a valve in the lastnamed pipe, substantially as specified.

14. I-n a carbureter, the combination ofl a closed tank; a closed tank divided by a horizontal screen or perforated partition into two compartments; a supply-pipe adapted to discharge into the lower compartment a liquid hydrocarbon and an aeriforrn fluid under pressure; a mass of sponge upon said screen or partition; a mass of wicks connected to the mass of sponge and having their loose ends protruding through said screen or partition and extending down into said lower compartment; a dornefor said carbureter having a central aperture; a wire basket having a cover provided'with a central aperture; a screwthreaded tube fitting the aperture of the said cover and the said aperture or' the dome; a mass of sponge in said basket; a nut on said

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5807422 *8 Apr 199715 Sep 1998Grgich; George R.Precompression, dehydration system
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationF01N3/021, B01D47/02