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Publication numberUS3895118 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication date15 Jul 1975
Filing date26 Jul 1973
Priority date26 Jul 1972
Also published asUS3899599
Publication numberUS 3895118 A, US 3895118A, US-A-3895118, US3895118 A, US3895118A
InventorsRambold Adolf
Original AssigneeRambold Adolf
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Infusion bag
US 3895118 A
Abstract
This disclosure relates to an infusion bag for tea or the like comprising a porous-walled container having a strip of non-porous sheet material secured thereto and folded about the container along a line spaced from the top edge of the container thereby defining a portion projecting therefrom as a handle. The strip further includes side portions extending from the fold line on opposite sides of the container which may be folded back upon themselves along a line parallel to the fold line and secured together by complementary interengaging means. The interengaging means may include a cut formed in at least one of the side portions, or a tab cut out of one of the side portions.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1 Rambold 1 INFUSION BAG Adolf Rambold, Bachstrasse 8, D-4005 Meerbusch 1, Germany 22 Filed: July 26,1973

2| Appl. No.: 383,039

[76] Inventor:

Irmscher 426/79 1 1 July 15, 1975 Primary ExaminerFrank W. Lutter Assistant Examiner-Steven L. Weinstein Attorney, Agent, or FirmWigman & Cohen [57] ABSTRACT This disclosure relates to an infusion bag for tea or the like comprising a porous-walled container having a strip of non-porous sheet material secured thereto and folded about the container along a line spaced from the top edge of the container thereby defining a portion projecting therefrom as a handle. The strip further includes side portions extending from the fold line on opposite sides of the container which may be folded back upon themselves along a line parallel to the fold line and secured together by complementary interengaging means. The interengaging means may include a cut formed in at least one of the side portions, or a tab cut out of one of the side portions.

14 Claims, 10 Drawing Figures INFUSION BAG The invention relates to an infusion bag with at least one chamber, containing in particular tea, the head of which is reinforced by a flexible strip which forms two side pieces which are folded together, and are attached to and hold between them the head of the bag.

A single chamber infusion bag of this type having a relatively stiff but plastically deformable flexible strip which consists, for example, of metal foil or syn thetic material and which is inert with respect to the contents of the bag and the liquid used for the infusion, is already known from US. Pat. No. 2,192,605. The strip which can be used as a label, holder, or suspension means is connected to the bag in that its two side pieces are knurled on the top of the bag. The arrangement is such that the line of the fold of the strip is immediately alongside the end edge of the bag head. It is only with difficulty that the infusion bag can be held by the relatively narrow knurled end. It is therefore envisaged that the projecting free portions of the two side pieces of the strip be set back by a fold line parallel with the fold line of the strip on the associated fixed portion of the relevant side piece and be laid one on the other so that the infusion bag is held by the raised side pieces of the strip and can be immersed into a glass or a cup at least as far as the top of the bag. It is, however, a disadvantage of the known infusion bag that when the two side pieces drop down onto the bag and when the bag, following the infusion, is squeezed out by means of the two side pieces, by two fingers of one hand being passed down the side pieces, the hot upper end of the infusion bag has to be held securely so that the fingers of the hand holding the bag must inevitably become wet with hot liquid containing extract. Ladies in particular will therefore have difficulties in using the known infusion bag and will have a negative attitude toward it.

The invention is therefore based on the problem of providing an easily manufactured infusion bag which can be conveniently held in all stages of its use, the manner in which it is to be used being evident from the first glance.

On a basis of an infusion bag of the type mentioned at the outset, the problem is, according to the invention, resolved in that the scribed line of the strip is disposed at an interval from the folded edge of the bag top, the projecting portion forming a handle.

The projecting part will be immediately recognized by anyone who takes hold of the infusion bag according to the invention. Also, its function requires no explanation since it is obvious. Anyone is now in a position, particularly when squeezing out the bag, which is gladly undertaken in order to obtain still further extract, to hold the infusion bag in such a way that squeezing out not only proceeds comfortably but also the fingers remain clean and cool. The gap between the fold line of the strip and the creased edge or, in the absence of such an edge, the end edge of the bag top can be of any desired size, preferably amounting to approximately mm so that a handle of the same size is provided by the projecting portion. Since under normal circumstances the top of the bag will at most reach to the edge of the glass or cup, the amount of projection is expediently such that the handle projects clearly above the rim of the glass or cup, facilitating usage and making it more pleasant.

A further advantage of the fusion bag according to the invention resides in the fact that, without risk of damaging the bag top and of losing bag contents, cuts may be made into the projecting portion which forms the handle, the cuts serving, in preferred forms of embodiment of the infusion bag according to the invention, to secure the position of at least one of the two side pieces of the strip if the strip is advantageously made from an elastically pliant material, for example paper, and does not therefore remain ofitself in any defined position.

If, as in the case of the preferred form of the embodiment of the infusion bag according to the invention, the strip extends in the region of the bag top substantially over its entire width, then the bag top may be advanta geously formed by making a single fold in the edge forming the aperture of the bag. This obviates the triple folds (one at the top, two in the corners) known in the case of double-chamber infusion bags which have no strip, the folds rendering manufacture expensive by requiring a greater quantity of materials and additional operations.

The invention will be explained in greater detail hereinafter with reference to three forms of embodiment of infusion bag according to the invention, shown in the attached drawings.

IN THE DRAWINGS:

FIGS. I and 2 are perspective views ofa first embodiment viewed from two different directions;

FIG 3 is a perspective view of the first embodiment in a cup during infusion;

FIGS. 4 and 5 are perspective views of a second form of embodiment viewed from different directions;

FIG. 6 is a perspective view of the second form of embodiment in a glass during infusion;

FIG. 6a is a perspective view of the second form of embodiment which is just being withdrawn from the glass following infusion;

FIGS. 7 and 8 are plan views of a third form of embodiment viewed from two opposite directions; and

FIG. 9 is a perspective view of the third form of embodiment in a glass during infusion.

Since the different forms of embodiment differ only in the design of the strip but not in the actual bag, this latter will be described first. The bag is a double chamber bag made from a fleece-like paper, resembling filter paper and similar to Japanese paper, which is formed into a tube, its ends being laid on one another, the edges forming the two openings of the bags being folded jointly to form the head or top of the bag.

The first form of embodiment according to FIGS. 1-3 is provided with a rectangular strip 20, the length of which many times exceeds its width, and which is folded in the center along a fold line 22 so that equally long side pieces 24 and 26 are formed which so enclose the actual bag 28 between them that the head 30 of the bag is at a fixed interval from the fold line 22. The projecting portion constitutes a handle 31 by which the bag 30 can be conveniently held. The bag 28 is connected to the strip 20 by a single non-rusting clip 32 made, for example, from aluminum which penetrates first the side piece 24, then the head 30 of the bag, and finally the side piece 26, on the outside of which it is closed. The two side pieces 24 and 26 are, in the region of their free ends, each provided with an inwardly directed cut 42, 44 extending parallel with the transverse edge 34, 36 from their left-hand longitudinal edge 38, 40 and extending approximately as far as the middle line of the strip 20. When tea is to be made, the two side pieces 24 and 26 are folded upwards directly beneath the clip 32, about fold lines which are not defined in greater detail, and are connected to each other by the cuts 42 and 44 being brought into alignment. The two side pieces then pass one through the other and hold themselves mutually firm. This is shown in H0. 3, from which it can be seen that now only the actual bag 28 is immersed into a cup 46 and into the liquid contained therein. After infusion, the two side pieces 24 and 26 are separated from each other again and are swung downwardly until the condition shown in FIGS. 1 and 2 is restored. After the bag 28 has been squeezed out, it is set aside with the strip 20.

The second form of embodiment shown in FIGS. 4-6 is particularly suitable for glasses but it can however also be used in cups. Placed around a double chamber bag 128 are the two equally long side pieces 124 and 126 of a long narrow strip 120 which is folded in the middle about a fold line 122 parallel with its transverse edges 134 and 136. A rectangular tab 150 attached to the side piece 124 along a connecting line 148 which is parallel with the fold line 122 and pointing towards the head 130 of the bag is cut out of the side piece 124. The distance between the connecting line 148 on one of the two side pieces 124 and 126 and the clip 132 made, for example. from stainless steel and connecting the two side pieces 124 and 126 to the top of the bag is somewhat greater than the distance between the clip 132 and the fold line 122 which creates a handle 131 so that when the side piece 124 is raised, as is indicated by broken lines in FIG. 5, the tab 150 can engage over the fold line 122 and bear on the side piece 126. Thus, the position of the side piece 124 can be secured while the bag 128 is immersed into the liquid present in the glass 152. So that the bag 128 can be immersed to an adequate distance into the glass 152, a rectangular tab 156 attached to the head 130 of the bag and connected to the side piece along a connecting line 154 parallel with its transverse edge 136 and pointing towards the free end of the side piece 126 is cut out of the other side piece 126 which is not raised. Thus, it is possible to immerse the bag 128 sufficiently far into the glass 152 until its edge 158 which engages between the side piece 126 on the one hand and tab 156 as well as the bag 128 on the other, is at the connecting line 154. Instead of the rectangularly formed tab 156, a triangular tab could be provided, its base extending over almost the entire width of the bag head and having an obtuse angle at its apex. Such a tab improves the bag head closure and facilitates introduction of a glass or cup rim between bag and side piece from which the tab is cut.

FIG. 6 shows both the securing of the bag 128 on the glass 152 and also the securing of the position of the side piece 124 in the raised condition. After infusion, the bag 128 is lifted out of the glass 152 by the side piece 124, two fingers on one hand gripping the handle 131 whereupon both side pieces are placed over the bag which is squeezed out over the glass, as is shown in an intermediate state in FIG, 6a.

The third form of embodiment shown in FIGS. 7--9 represents a kind of combination of the first two forms of embodiment. A strip 220 corresponding in its basic form to the strip 20 and 120 is likewise constructed with identical side pieces. Both side pieces 224 and 226 are, in the region of the handle 231 formed by the strip 220, provided with rectangular tabs 260, 262 which extend to a point close to both longitudinal edges 238 and 264 or 240 and 266 and to a point close to the fold line 222 of the strip 220, their outline being pre-stamped out as far as the connecting lines 253 and 254. The tabs 260 and 262 are jointly attached to the bag head 230 by a clip 232. The side piece 224 is provided at its free end with an inwardly directed cut 268 extending from the side edge 238 and parallel with its transverse edge 234, the cut extending approximately as far as the middle between the longitudinal edges 238 and 264. If the bag 228 is to be infused, for example, in a glass 252, then as shown in FIG. 9, the two side pieces 224 and 226 are folded upwardly about the connecting line 253, 254. The side pieces are connected simply in that the side piece 226 is introduced into the slit 268 in the side piece 224, its longitudinal edge 240 leading. According to the height of the glass 252, the two sides pieces will project upwardly or hang down over the outside of the glass. After infusion, the side pieces are separated from each other again and are placed against the bag 228 again so that this may be squeezed. This third form of embodiment is entirely suitable for cups or even for pots. In the last-mentioned case, the material of the strip 220 should be as soft as possible to allow a pot lid to be used.

The strips for the various forms of embodiment are expediently made in one piece from water-repellant material, for example, impregnated paper or paper lined at least on one side with a synthetic plastic film. Particularly in the last-mentioned case, the strip may be welded on the head of the bag so that a fixing clip becomes unnecessary.

At all places which are subjected to considerable flexing, scribed lines may be provided to facilitate folding unless a pre-stamped scribed line is already provided.

As will be readily obvious, individual features of the forms of embodiment may be interchanged with or supplemented by features of other forms of embodiment.

It is claimed:

1. An infusion bag containing an infusible substance comprising a porous-walled container for the infusible substance, said container including an elongated head portion having a top edge, a strip of flexible non-porous sheet material secured to said head portion and folded about said container along a line spaced from said top edge defining a portion projecting therefrom as a handle, said strip including side portions extending from said line on opposite sides of said container, at least one of said side portions extending over the entire length of said bag, and means formed in at least one of said side portions adapted to interengage with the other one of said side portions for securing said at least one of said side portions to the said other one of said side portions when folded back upon itself along a line parallel to said line.

2. Infusion bag according to claim 1, characterized in that one of said side portions includes a tab pointing towards the head portion and connected to said side portion along a connecting line, the distance between the connecting line and the point of attachment of the side portion to the head portion being at least as great as the distance between this attachment point and said fold line.

3. Infusion bag according to claim 1, characterized in that the strip side portions are attached to the head portion at oppositely disposed places by means of a single non-rusting fixing clip.

4. Infusion bag according to claim 1, characterized in that the strip is welded on the head portion.

5. Infusion bag according to claim 1, in which in the region of the head portion the strip extends substantially over its entire width, characterized in that the head portion is created by a single folding of the edge forming the container opening.

6. An infusion bag as defined in claim 1, comprising complementary means formed in each of said side portions adapted to interengage with each other for securing said side portions together when folded back upon themselves along lines parallel to said line.

7. Infusion bag according to claim 1, characterized in that a tab attached to the head portion and connected to at least one of the side portions along a connecting line is cut from and points to the free end thereof.

8. Infusion bag according to claim 7, characterized in that said tab is constructed on each side portion which extends to a point close to both longitudinal edges of the respective side portion.

9. Infusion bag according to claim 1, characterized in that the strip is made from an elastically flexible material and in that said interengaging means includes at least one inwardly directed cut formed in at least one of said side portions.

10. Infusion bag according to claim 9, each of said side portions including two parallel longitudinal edges and a transverse edge spaced from said top edge, characterized in that said out is provided in at least one of the side portions and extending parallel with the transverse edge from one of the two longitudinal edges.

11. Infusion bag according to claim 10, characterized in that the other side portion is provided with a complementary cut.

l2. Infusion bag according to claim 1, characterized in that said sheet is made in one piece from waterrepellant material.

13. Infusion bag according to claim 12, characterized in that impregnated paper is provided as the sheet material.

l4. Infusion bag according to claim 12, characterized in that paper lined at least on one side with a synthetic plastic film is provided as the sheet material.

f li

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Referenced by
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US4141997 *27 Sep 197627 Feb 1979Syroka Edward CMulti-compartment coffee steeping bag and support clip therefor
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Classifications
U.S. Classification426/83, 426/80, 426/82, 206/.5
International ClassificationB65D81/00, B65D33/06, B65D85/812, B65D77/00, A47J31/06, B65D85/804
Cooperative ClassificationB65D85/812
European ClassificationB65D85/812