Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3889686 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication date17 Jun 1975
Filing date26 Jun 1973
Priority date4 Jul 1972
Publication numberUS 3889686 A, US 3889686A, US-A-3889686, US3889686 A, US3889686A
InventorsStanley Francis Duturbure
Original AssigneeHoswell Vicki Lorraine
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Catheter tube
US 3889686 A
Abstract
A catheter having two bores in a main flexible tube. The first bore is for drainage of waste matter from the bladder and two apertures are provided, one adjacent the leading end of the catheter, the second being spaced from the first towards the following end of the catheter. Each of the apertures allows waste matter to drain from the bladder through the first bore. A thin tubular membrane is provided around the main tube of the catheter substantially in the region between the first and second apertures. The second bore communicates with the space between the membrane and the main tube via a further aperture in the main tube. Distilled water or the like may be introduced to this space through the second bore to expand the membrane so that the leading end of the catheter containing the two drainage apertures may be held in the bladder during use. Part of the thin tubular membrane is so arranged around the tube adjacent the second drainage aperture that a port is formed when the membrane is expanded whereby waste matter in the bladder in the vicinity of the junction of the bladder with the urethra may drain through the second aperture.
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Duturbure June 17, 1975 CATHETER TUBE Primarv ExaminerDalton L. Truluck 75 I t St 1 F D b men or zzfg fg fi z g fi g g Attorney, Agent, or Flrm Ladas, Parry, Von Gehr,

' Goldsmith & Deschamps [73] Assignees: Vicki Lorraine Hoswell, Parramatta;

Michael Roy Duturbure, Wentworthville; Ronda Lynne Walker, Blacktown, all of Australia [22] Filed: June 26, 1973 [21] Appl. No.: 373,729

[30] Foreign Application Priority Data July 4, 1972 Australia 44209/72 [52] US. Cl 128/349 B [51] Int. Cl. A61m 25/00 [58] Field of Search 128/348, 349 B, 349 BV,

i 56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,919,697 1/1960 Kim 128/349 B 3,392,722 7/1968 .lorgensen 129/350 R X 3,726,283 4/1973 Dye et 81.... 129/349 BV 3,736,939 6/1973 Taylor 128/349 B 3,811,448 5/1974 Morton 128/349 B OTHER PUBLICATIONS Brit. Med. .lour. 25 Feb. 1967, p. 485.

57 ABSTRACT A catheter having two bores in a main flexible tube. The first bore is for drainage of waste matter from the bladder and two apertures are provided, one adjacent the leading end of the catheter, the second being spaced from the first towards the following end of the catheter. Each of the apertures allows waste matter to drain from the bladder through the first bore. A thin tubular membrane is provided around the main tube of the catheter substantially in the region between the first and second apertures. The second bore communicates with the space between the membrane and the main tube via a further aperture in the main tube. Distilled water or the like may be introduced to this space through the second bore to expand the membrane so that the leading end of the catheter containing the two drainage apertures may be held in the bladder during use. Part of the thin tubular membrane is so arranged around the tube adjacent the second drainage aperture that a port is formed when the membrane is expanded whereby waste matter in the bladder in the vicinity of the junction of the bladder with the urethra may drain through the second aperture.

2 Claims, 4 Drawing Figures CATHETER TUBE This invention relates to catheters.

Persons who are unable to control their bladders, such as paraplegics and quadriplegics, are fitted with catheters to drain urine and other waste matter from their bladders. Conventionally, such catheters comprise an extended flexible tube inserted through the urethra so that a small portion of the catheter extends into the bladder. In one form of known catheters the small portion extending into the bladder has an aperture adjacent the end thereof through which waste matter drains from the bladder through the flexible tube to a collection bag affixed to the end of the tube outside the body of the person concerned in the vicinity of the point where the flexible tube enters the body. Such conventional catheter is provided, adjacent the aperture and between the aperture and the junction of the urethra and the bladder when the catheter is in position, with a thin tubular membrane affixed around the said flexible tube. Within the tube there is provided a second bore, complementary to the bore through which waste matter drains from the bladder, this second bore communicating through a further aperture in the wall of the flexible tube with the space between the flexible tube and the thin tubular membrane so that the space between the flexible tube and the thin tubular membrane may be substantially filled with fluid such as distilled water whereby the thin tubular membrane is ballooned within the bladder. The ballooning of this thin tubular membrane prevents the end of the catheter wherein the draining aperture is provided from retracting from its position in the bladder. A major disadvantage of this known catheter is that fluids in the bladder tend to rest between the aperture and the junction of the bladder and the urethra and the ballooned thin tubular membrane prevents the drainage of these fluids through the aperture.

In order to overcome the disadvantage indicated above, it has been proposed to provide a second aperture in the wall of the flexible tube adjacent the thin tubular membrane but on the opposite side of this membrane from the first draining aperture. However, it has been found that this second aperture tends to locate in the urethra below the junction of the urethra and the bladder when the thin tubular membrane is ballooned so that provision of this second aperture does not overcome the difficulty referred to above.

It is an object of this invention to provide catheter means wherein a second aperture is provided as described above, said second aperture being located in the bladder adjacent the junction of the bladder and the urethra when the space between the thin tubular membrane and the flexible tube is ballooned, wherein the ballooned thin tubular membrane is arranged about the second aperture so that a port is provided through which port waste matter in the bladder adjacent the junction of the bladder and the urethra may pass into the second aperture thence into the first bore to be drained from the catheter.

It is a further object of this invention in a preferred form to provide a catheter as described wherein a nonreturn valve is provided in the first bore between the second and the first apertures so that cleaning fluid forced into the first bore may enter the bladder through the second aperture but is prevented by the non-return valve from entering that part of the first bore between the non-return valve and the first aperture.

It will be seen that waste matter in the bladder below the level of said first aperture will drain through the port into the first bore of the flexible tube and thence from the catheter into the collection bag provided at the end of the catheter.

Preferred forms of the invention are illustrated in the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is a side elevation of the leading end of a first form of catheter tube in a suitable condition for insertion,

FIG. 2 is a side elevation of the catheter inserted into the bladder with the location balloon inflated to hold the catheter in place in the bladder,

FIG. 3 is an enlarged view in section on the line 3-3 in FIG. 2, and

FIG. 4 is a similar view to FIG. 3 of a second form of the catheter which incorporates a non-return valve.

The catheter 5 comprises a flexible tube 6 having two longitudinal bores 7 and 8 extending substantially throughout its length; the bore 7 being of larger diameter than the bore 8. The bore 7 extends to the closed leading end 9 of the tube 6, the said end 9 being rounded to assist insertion. A radial aperture 10 is provided in the tube wall adjacent its end 9, and a second similar aperture 11 is located a short distance down the tube 6 for a purpose to be described; both apertures communicate with the bore 7.

A thin tubular membrane 12 is positioned about th tube 6 between the apertures 10 and 11. The upper end 13 of the tube 12 is united as by welding with the wall of the tube 6. The lower end 14 of the membrane 12 extends below the aperture 11 but is cut away at 15 in U-shaped configuration about the periphery of said aperture 11. The end 14 and cut-away portion 15 of the tube 12 is joined to the wall of the tube 6.

The narrow bore 8 in the tube 6 extends to a medial termination between the apertures 10 and 11. A third aperture 16 extends radially, from the bore 8, into the space 17 between the bore of the tube 12, and the outer wall of the tube 6.

Fluid such as distilled water may be forced up the narrow bore 8 and into the space 17 just described. This will cause the membrane 12 to balloon out into a substantially spherical configuration. The cut-away portion 15 will form a port 18 in the region of the aperture 11.

In use the membrane 12 is deflated so that it closely engages the tube 6 as shown in FIG. 1. The catheter 5 is then inserted so that its leading end 9 enters the bladder 18 with the membrane 12 fully within the bladder and with the aperture 11 adjacent the bladder entrance 19. The membrane 12 is then inflated to the spherical form as shown in FIGS. 2 and 3, so that the catheter will be retained within the bladder 18 with the membrane 12 substantially engaging the bladder entrance. The contents of the bladder can now be withdrawn through the apertures 10 and 11 and down the tube 6 via its larger bore 7. It will be seen that the bladder can be substantially emptied as fluid and solid deposits adjacent the bladder floor 20 can be drawn through the aperture 11 via the port 18 formed by the cut-away portion 15 of the ballooned membrane 12.

In a modified form of the catheter shown in FIG. 4 an integral flap 21 is formed within the bore 7 immediately below the aperture 10. With this form of catheter,

cleaning fluid may be forced up,the larger bore 7 to flush out the bladder 18. It will be seen that during this operation, the flap valve 21 close the tube 7 so that all of the cleaning fluid will be forcedzto emerge from the lower aperture 11. This ensures the deposits on the bladder floor will'be dislodged. The cleaning fluid and entrained deposits can now be drained through the tube 6 as previously described.

Although this invention has been described in the specification and the claims, it will be obvious to a man skilled in the art that minor variations may be made without detracting from the merit of the invention. The specification and claims should be read so as to incorporate such minor variations.

What I claim is:

l. Catheter means comprising an extended flexible tube, said tube housing first and second longitudinal bore means, said first bore means extending for substantially the entire length of the catheter and terminating adjacent the leading end of the tube;

first and second aperture means in the tube communicating with said first bore means;

said first aperture means being located adjacent the leading end of said tube and said second aperture means being spaced from said first aperture means towards the following end of said tube;

thin tubular membrane means positioned around said tube substantially in the region of the tube between said first and said second aperture means and being affixed to an entirely surrounding said tube so that a junction between said membrane and said tube is not above said second aperture means except in the immediate area thereof where said junction is above said second aperture means;

said second bore means extending substantially throughout the length of said catheter;

further aperture means in said tube interconnecting said second bore means and the space between said tube and said thin tubular membrane means; and

port means, through which waste matter may pass from a bladder into which that part of the catheter containing said first and said second aperture means is inserted through said second aperture means and into said first bore means, said port means positioned within the area around said second aperture at the said junctions of the membrane and tube and being formed in said thin tubular membrane means when the space between said thin tubular membrane means and said flexible tube is ballooned by the introduction of fluid into said space.

2. Catheter means as in claim 1 wherein a non-return valve is provided in the flexible tube between the second and first apertures.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2919697 *8 Oct 19585 Jan 1960Kim Se KyongCatheters
US3392722 *29 Jul 196516 Jul 1968Roger L. JorgensenPost-operative surgical valve
US3726283 *7 Oct 197110 Apr 1973Kendall & CoBody-retained catheter
US3736939 *7 Jan 19725 Jun 1973Kendall & CoBalloon catheter with soluble tip
US3811448 *25 Oct 197221 May 1974A MortonUrinary drainage catheter
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3954110 *24 Jan 19744 May 1976Hutchison Ernest LRetention catheter with bilobate balloon
US4211233 *5 Jan 19788 Jul 1980Lin Edward DUrethral catheter
US4224929 *3 Nov 197830 Sep 1980Olympus Optical Co., Ltd.Endoscope with expansible cuff member and operation section
US4342316 *6 Jul 19813 Aug 1982The Kendall CompanyZero stasis catheter
US4349029 *16 Jun 198014 Sep 1982Mott Patricia ADrainage balloon catheter system
US4535757 *12 Mar 198220 Aug 1985Webster Wilton W JrAutoinflatable catheter
US4581017 *7 Mar 19838 Apr 1986Harvinder SahotaCatheter systems
US4857054 *15 Jul 198815 Aug 1989Eastman Kodak CompanyPerfusion angioplasty catheter with pump assist
US4944745 *29 Feb 198831 Jul 1990Scimed Life Systems, Inc.Perfusion balloon catheter
US4976691 *23 Jan 198911 Dec 1990Harvinder SahotaTopless catheters
US4983167 *23 Nov 19888 Jan 1991Harvinder SahotaBalloon catheters
US5090958 *5 Oct 199025 Feb 1992Harvinder SahotaBalloon catheters
US5092844 *10 Apr 19903 Mar 1992Mayo Foundation For Medical Education And ResearchIntracatheter perfusion pump apparatus and method
US5137513 *2 Jul 199011 Aug 1992Advanced Cardiovoascular Systems, Inc.Perfusion dilatation catheter
US5143093 *5 Oct 19901 Sep 1992Harvinder SahotaMethods of angioplasty treatment of stenotic regions
US5147377 *12 Jul 199015 Sep 1992Harvinder SahotaBalloon catheters
US5160321 *27 Nov 19913 Nov 1992Harvinder SahotaBalloon catheters
US5295962 *18 Dec 199222 Mar 1994Cardiovascular Dynamics, Inc.Drug delivery and dilatation catheter
US5295995 *27 Aug 199222 Mar 1994Kleiman Jay HPerfusion dilatation catheter
US5320605 *22 Jan 199314 Jun 1994Harvinder SahotaMulti-wire multi-balloon catheter
US5324260 *27 Apr 199228 Jun 1994Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyRetrograde coronary sinus catheter
US5344402 *30 Jun 19936 Sep 1994Cardiovascular Dynamics, Inc.Low profile perfusion catheter
US5368566 *29 Apr 199229 Nov 1994Cardiovascular Dynamics, Inc.Delivery and temporary stent catheter having a reinforced perfusion lumen
US5370617 *17 Sep 19936 Dec 1994Sahota; HarvinderBlood perfusion balloon catheter
US5395331 *23 Feb 19937 Mar 1995Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyRetrograde coronary sinus catheter having a ribbed balloon
US5421826 *13 Jan 19946 Jun 1995Cardiovascular Dynamics, Inc.Drug delivery and dilatation catheter having a reinforced perfusion lumen
US5433706 *25 Oct 199318 Jul 1995Cordis CorporationPerfusion balloon catheter
US5484411 *14 Jan 199416 Jan 1996Cordis CorporationSpiral shaped perfusion balloon and method of use and manufacture
US5490837 *2 Mar 199413 Feb 1996Scimed Life Systems, Inc.Single operator exchange catheter having a distal catheter shaft section
US5501667 *15 Mar 199426 Mar 1996Cordis CorporationPerfusion balloon and method of use and manufacture
US5522800 *16 Dec 19944 Jun 1996Cardiovascular Dynamics, Inc.Low profile perfusion catheter
US5542926 *8 Mar 19946 Aug 1996Cardiovascular Dynamics, Inc.Low profile perfusion catheter
US5558644 *12 Jan 199524 Sep 1996Heartport, Inc.Retrograde delivery catheter and method for inducing cardioplegic arrest
US5569184 *3 Aug 199529 Oct 1996Cardiovascular Dynamics, Inc.Delivery and balloon dilatation catheter and method of using
US5571089 *16 Dec 19945 Nov 1996Cardiovascular Dynamics, Inc.Low profile perfusion catheter
US5613948 *3 May 199625 Mar 1997Cordis CorporationAnnular perfusion balloon catheter
US5645533 *26 Jan 19958 Jul 1997Scimed Life Systems, Inc.Apparatus and method for performing an intravascular procedure and exchanging an intravascular device
US5716325 *1 Aug 199410 Feb 1998General Surgical Innovations, Inc.Arthroscopic retractors and method of using the same
US5738652 *17 Jan 199714 Apr 1998Heartport, Inc.Retrograde delivery catheter and method for inducing cardioplegic arrest
US5755687 *1 Apr 199726 May 1998Heartport, Inc.Methods and devices for occluding a patient's ascending aorta
US5765568 *1 Dec 199516 Jun 1998Heartport, Inc.Catheter system and method for venting the left ventricle
US5769812 *16 Oct 199623 Jun 1998Heartport, Inc.System for cardiac procedures
US5792094 *28 Sep 199511 Aug 1998Heartport, Inc.Method of delivering cardioplegic fluid to a patient's heart
US5792300 *24 Jul 199611 Aug 1998Cordis CorporationPerfusion catheter and striped extrusion method of manufacture
US5800375 *20 Dec 19951 Sep 1998Heartport, Inc.Catheter system and method for providing cardiopulmonary bypass pump support during heart surgery
US5800393 *7 Mar 19971 Sep 1998Sahota; HarvinderWire perfusion catheter
US5810757 *1 Dec 199522 Sep 1998Heartport, Inc.Catheter system and method for total isolation of the heart
US5833706 *18 May 199510 Nov 1998Scimed Life Systems, Inc.Single operator exchange perfusion catheter having a distal catheter shaft section
US5885238 *30 May 199523 Mar 1999Heartport, Inc.System for cardiac procedures
US5935103 *18 Jul 199710 Aug 1999Heartport, Inc.Blood vessel occlusion device
US5941894 *18 Jul 199724 Aug 1999Heartport, Inc.Blood vessel occlusion device
US5947927 *23 Mar 19987 Sep 1999Scimed Life Systems, Inc.Convertible catheter having a single proximal lumen
US5951514 *23 Jun 199814 Sep 1999Sahota; HarvinderMulti-lobe perfusion balloon
US5976107 *6 Mar 19972 Nov 1999Scimed Life Systems. Inc.Catheter having extendable guide wire lumen
US5997505 *18 Jul 19977 Dec 1999Heartport, Inc.Method of cannulating an ascending aorta using a blood vessel occlusion device
US6015402 *4 Jun 199818 Jan 2000Sahota; HarvinderWire perfusion catheter
US6056723 *22 May 19982 May 2000Heartport, Inc.Methods and devices for occluding a patient's ascending aorta
US6090069 *5 Aug 199718 Jul 2000Walker; Frank J.Irrigation and drainage urinary catheter
US6159178 *23 Jan 199812 Dec 2000Heartport, Inc.Methods and devices for occluding the ascending aorta and maintaining circulation of oxygenated blood in the patient when the patient's heart is arrested
US622461917 Sep 19961 May 2001Heartport, Inc.Blood vessel occlusion trocar having size and shape varying insertion body
US624504029 Aug 199612 Jun 2001Cordis CorporationPerfusion balloon brace and method of use
US624808623 Feb 199819 Jun 2001Heartport, Inc.Method for cannulating a patient's aortic arch and occluding the patient's ascending aortic arch
US62939207 Oct 199825 Sep 2001Heartport, Inc.Catheter system and method for providing cardiopulmonary bypass pump support during heart surgery
US63987525 Jun 19984 Jun 2002William P. Sweezer, Jr.Method of occluding a patient's ascending aorta and delivery cardioplegic fluid
US64230311 Nov 199923 Jul 2002Brian S. DonlonMethods and devices for occluding a patient's ascending aorta
US648217113 Jan 199719 Nov 2002Heartport, Inc.Multi-lumen catheter
US658920610 Oct 20008 Jul 2003Heartport, Inc.Methods and devices for occluding the ascending aorta and maintaining circulation of oxygenated blood in the patient when the patient's heart is arrested
US69025565 Jun 20027 Jun 2005Heartport, Inc.Methods and devices for occluding the ascending aorta and maintaining circulation oxygenated blood in the patient when the patient's heart is arrested
US874743910 Jul 200610 Jun 2014P Tech, LlcMethod of using ultrasonic vibration to secure body tissue with fastening element
US88083293 Apr 201219 Aug 2014Bonutti Skeletal Innovations LlcApparatus and method for securing a portion of a body
US881490231 Jul 200626 Aug 2014Bonutti Skeletal Innovations LlcMethod of securing body tissue
US884568717 Sep 201330 Sep 2014Bonutti Skeletal Innovations LlcAnchor for securing a suture
US88456996 Mar 201230 Sep 2014Bonutti Skeletal Innovations LlcMethod of securing tissue
US896149425 Oct 201224 Feb 2015Bridgepoint Medical, Inc.Endovascular devices and methods for exploiting intramural space
US944004327 Feb 201513 Sep 2016Leading Age Supplies LLCCatheter having a tapered structure and balloon formed above a lower drainage hole
US977023823 Feb 200426 Sep 2017P Tech, LlcMagnetic positioning apparatus
US20060195135 *24 Feb 200631 Aug 2006Ihab AyoubPass-through catheter
US20080167628 *5 Jan 200710 Jul 2008Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc.Stent delivery system
US20100016834 *13 Apr 200921 Jan 2010Innoventions Ltd.Device, system, and method for releasing substances in a body cavity
WO1996034647A1 *30 Apr 19967 Nov 1996Cedars-Sinai Medical CenterImplantable catheter and method of use
WO2003070310A1 *21 Feb 200328 Aug 2003Chul-Jun KimIndwelling urinary catheter
WO2015191125A1 *6 Mar 201517 Dec 2015Leading Age Supplies LLCCatheter having a tapered structure and balloon formed above a lower drainage hole
Classifications
U.S. Classification604/102.3, 604/915
International ClassificationA61F2/958, A61M25/00
Cooperative ClassificationA61M25/10, A61M2025/0076, A61M25/00, A61M25/0075
European ClassificationA61M25/00T20A, A61M25/10, A61M25/00