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Publication numberUS3884463 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication date20 May 1975
Filing date7 Mar 1973
Priority date7 Mar 1973
Publication numberUS 3884463 A, US 3884463A, US-A-3884463, US3884463 A, US3884463A
InventorsRoger J Malatesta
Original AssigneeRoger J Malatesta
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Pneumatic collapsible exercising device of the according type
US 3884463 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1 [111 3,884,463

Malatesta 1- May 20, 1975 [54] PNEUMATIC COLLAPSIBLE EXERCISING 3,020,673 2/1962 COOkC 417/472 X DEVICE OF T ACCORDING TY 3,162,371 12/1964 Palmer et a1 92/34 X Inventor: Roger J. Malatesta, 202 Tyrone Ave, Wilmington, Del. 19804 Filed: Mar. 7, 1973 Appl. No.: 338,964

US. Cl. 272/79 C; 272/DIG. 1 Int. Cl.. A63b 23/02; A63b 23/04; A63b 21/00 Field of Search 272/79 R, 79 C, DIG. l, 272/57 R, 74, 80, 83, DIG. 4; 188/266, 279; 417/472; 46/150, 90; 91/469; 128/210 References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 6/1937 Henion 128/210 X 8/1954 Hasselquist 417/472 X 6/1961 Lemelson 92/34 X Primary Examiner-Richard C. Pinkham Assistant ExaminerWilliam R. Browne Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Robert Jacobs, Esq.

[57] ABSTRACT A pneumatic exercising device: having a body that is of a unitary one piece flexible construction, collapsible, of the accordion type, and having a variable valve in one end to permit different amounts of air to be expelled or drawn into the device during an exercise program. The varying of the valve opening will make it necessary for the user to exert different amounts of force to collapse or open the device. The valve may be of one of the following types, a reducing screw or nut or check.

11 Claims, 5 Drawing Figures PNEUMATIC COLLAPSIBLE EXERCISING DEVICE OF THE ACCORDING TYPE This invention concerns a pneumatic exercise device which due to its simplicity of design and use of air as a resistant means enables one to have one device for exercising either in tension or compression. The device is contemplated for use in exercising all body muscles including those of the biceps, chest, back and legs. Exercise is obtained for both tensing or compressing motion against resistance.

Heretofore the most popular exercise devices have been springtype devices which can be used either in compression or in tension exercises, but not in both. Some complicated pneumatic devices have been devised, using telescoping tubes or self-contained air cyl inders to give resistance, however, due to the complexity of these exercise devices or due to the sophisticated sealing mechanism, these devices have not become popular or are unreliable.

It is an object of this invention to provide a reliable pneumatic exercise device which can be used for exercises in both tension and compression.

Other objects of this invention will become evident to those skilled in the art from this specification and from examination of the drawing and examples contained herein.

FIG. 1 shows the expanded accordion type exercising device in an expanded condition with hand grips at each end.

FIG. 2 is the same device as FIG. 1 but rotated 90.

FIG. 3 shows an end view of FIG. 1.

FIG. 4 shows a collapsed view of the device of FIG. 1.

FIG. 5 showsa section view of the end plate of FIG. 1 with a particular air control means.

In referring to FIG. 1, this exercise device is comprised of a collapsible body shown in FIG. 1 as Item ll, two side pieces attached and sealed thereto, indicated as Item 2, and, in one or both of the side pieces, Item 2, there is supplied a variable means, Item 3, for adjusting the speed at which air can enter or leave the accordion body. Once the side pieces and the accordion body are attached they are an airtight unit. Item 3 may be a valve, it may be a hole through which an angular constricting screw is turned into the side piece so that the further in the screw goes the narrower the opening and the slower air flows into the body of the exercising device. Item 6 of FIG. 5 illustrates one type of constricting screw. Air is allowed in the side channel of said screw and the further in said screw is threaded the smaller the opening for air egress. Other types of air control means would include a threaded hole in which can be fitted interchangeable hole-reducing screws or nuts with different size openings, variable pressure release valves, and any other valve which can be adjusted to vary the opening for air flow. The amount of resistance is determined by the speed at which the air enters the body of the pneumatic device. Thus, if there is a large opening and one compresses the device there will be a small resistance due to the speed at which the air is allowed to flow out and the force necessary to close the device will be minimal. The same force would be required to reopen the collapsible body since the air would flow in at the same resistance. If an extremely small opening is provided, and thus the air can escape only under great pressure or at slow speed, a greater force would be necessary to collapse or open the collapsible body. FIG. 4 is a schematic sketch of the pneumatic device in a collapsed mode and is meant to show the relative size of the device collapsed, as shown in FIG. 4 and expanded in FIG. I or 2.

Not only does the size of the opening determine the amount of force needed, but the speed at which the device is opened or closed determines the amount of force necessary to open or close the device. Thus, if there is a small opening and one exerts a minimum force one could open or close the device at a very low speed. If one exerts a large force it will collapse at a faster speed. Thus, this exercise device is singularly suited to rhythmic exercise, the speed of which would determine the force necessary to close or open the device. Therefore the user controls the amount of true exercise he is obtaining.

Although the collapsible body and the side pieces together with a means for controlling the flow of air in and out of the collapsible body are sufficient to comprise this invention, it is desirable to have some means other than the side pieces to hold the exercise device. Thus, straps such as illustrated in FIGS. 1 through 4, wooden or metallic handles or other gripping means can be attached to the side piece for ease of use. The preferred configuration are adjustable straps, Item 5, as shown in FIGS. I through 4. This is preferable since the adjustable straps allow one to use this device with either the arms or the legs as the straps can be adjusted to fit around any of these members.

The preferred means for controlling the entrance and exit of air to this device is the use of exchangeable threaded nuts which have different size holes and are illustrated in FIG. 3 as Item 3.. Item 3 contains a small center hole in a nut which has; a male or female thread compatible with a counterthreading contained within the side piece.

If one were to desire to use this pneumatic device in only tension or compression exercises, then the device can be supplied with an additional opening which would allow air to exit or enter at a rapid speed, in other words a check valve which would only open in one direction to allow air to enter or exit rapidly. By adjusting this check valve, shown as Item 4 in FIG. 3, one would then completely eliminate the resistance to opening or closing the collapsible pneumatic exercise device.

Although the dimensions of this device are not critical, in general the collapsible cylinder would have a collapsed diameter of from about 4 inches to about 10 inches and an extended diameter from about 3 inches to about 9 inches. The difference between the collapsed diameter and the extended diameter would vary from as little as one-half inch to as great as 3 or 4 inches. The overall extended length of this exercise device would usually be from 2 to 6 feet and preferably up to 4 feet from one end piece to the other end piece. The dimensions of the end pieces would be compatible with the dimension of the collapsible body at its minimum diameter in maximum extension.

The collapsible body may be made from various materials such as high-strength elastomers, rubber, metal sheets such as steel, aluminum or iron sheeting, or other suitable plastic materials which would be able to withstand constant flexure and compression at relatively high pressure. Materials which could withstand up to to 300 p.s.i.a. are preferred. The side pieces can be made of wood, plastic or metal, but would preferably be machined from metal and would be from onehalf to 3 inches thick. Although the thickness may be less than one-half inch or more than 3 inches, it is preferable to be within this range so that there would be sufficient thickness to properly hold the necessary check valve and air controlling means and yet not too thick to be excessively heavy or too thin to be excessively weak.

Although the invention has been described with particular examples equivalent materials and means are contemplated.

Having described my invention 1 claim:

1. A pneumatic exercise device of the class described which is comprised of a one piece flexible collapsible body of accordion type two side pieces attached and sealed to the ends thereto, and a variable means in at least one of said pieces for allowing varying amounts of air to exit upon compression of said device for permitting varying amounts of air to enter upon tension of said device by a user during an exercise program, said variable means being adjustable to change the force required to make air exit upon closing and enter upon tensioning the collapsible body during an exercise program by a user.

2. A pneumatic exercise device according to claim 1, containing gripping means to allow a user to more easily open and close the collapsible body during an exercise program.

3. A pneumatic exercise device according to claim 2, wherein said variable means is an angular constricting screw.

4. A pneumatic exercise device according to claim 2, wherein said variable means is an interchangable hole reducing screw.

5. A pneumatic exercise device according to claim 2,

wherein said variable means is an interchangeable hole reducing nut.

6. A pneumatic exercise device according to claim 2, wherein said variable means is a variable pressure release valve.

7. A pneumatic exercise device according to claim 2, wherein said side pieces contained a check valve.

8. A pneumatic exercise device according to claim I, said side pieces contain threaded holes and check valves, said variable means for allowing air to exit and enter includes an angular constricting screw, and said device further contains gripping means to allow a user to grasp and more easily compress and open the collapsible body during an exercise program.

9. A pneumatic exercise device according to claim 1, said side pieces contain threaded holes and check valves, said variable means has a pressure relief valve and said device further contains gripping means to allow a user to grasp and more easily compress and open the collapsible body during an exercise program.

10. A pneumatic exercise device according to claim 1, said side pieces contained threaded holes and check valves, said variable means includes an interchangeable hole reducing screw, and said device further contains gripping means to allow a user to more easily grasp and compress and open the collapsible body during an exercise program.

11. A pneumatic exercise device according to claim 1, said side pieces contain threaded holes and check valves, said variable means includes interchangeable hole reducing nuts, said device further contains gripping means to allow a user to more easily grasp and compress and open the collapsible body during an exercise program.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4248421 *26 Jun 19793 Feb 1981Salazar Maria VChest exerciser
US4635931 *6 Sep 198413 Jan 1987Braennstam GunillaApparatus for arm and leg exercise
US4867445 *7 Mar 198619 Sep 1989Richard E. Connelly Co., Inc.Resistance-type exercise apparatus
US5356361 *13 May 199318 Oct 1994The United States Of America As Represented By The Administrator Of National Aeronautics And Space AdministrationSelf-generating oscillating pressure exercise device
US5529573 *15 Nov 199325 Jun 1996Danninger Medical Technology, Inc.Pneumatic fluid actuated continuous passive motion device
US5626543 *3 Apr 19966 May 1997Chen; PingBellows-like exerciser
US5735780 *8 May 19967 Apr 1998Genevieve M. GriffinChest and body exerciser
US6468190 *13 Jan 199822 Oct 2002Genevieve M. GriffinChest and body exerciser
US7160229 *23 Oct 20029 Jan 2007Equbic Product Company, LlcExercising air footboard and buffer for air footboard
US832869922 Nov 200611 Dec 2012Equbic Product Company, LlcExercising air footboard and buffer for air footboard
DE3432802A1 *6 Sep 198411 Apr 1985Gunilla BraennstamVorrichtung fuer die bein- oder armmuskulaturuebung einer bettlaegrigen oder auf einem bett liegenden person
WO1987005227A1 *9 Mar 198711 Sep 1987Connelly Richard E Co IncResistance-type exercise apparatus
Classifications
U.S. Classification482/112
International ClassificationA63B21/008
Cooperative ClassificationA63B21/00043, A63B21/0085
European ClassificationA63B21/00D2, A63B21/008C