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Publication numberUS3826252 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication date30 Jul 1974
Filing date14 Jul 1972
Priority date14 Jul 1972
Publication numberUS 3826252 A, US 3826252A, US-A-3826252, US3826252 A, US3826252A
InventorsLaico J
Original AssigneeLaico J
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Edge wrapping for casts and method for using same
US 3826252 A
Abstract
There is disclosed an edge wrapping for use in making casts. A strip of material is wrapped around each end of the part to be casted; thereafter, a soft lining and the cast material are applied, and the free edge of each strip is folded back and embedded in the cast material. By using edge wrapping strips, as opposed to the conventional cylindrical wrapping (commonly called "stockinette"), the disadvantages of the latter are avoided and a number of advantages are obtained.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [191 Laico [111 3,826,252 [451 July 30, 1974 EDGE WRAPPING FOR CASTS AND METHOD FOR USING SAME [76] Inventor: Joseph P. Laico, 9 Ardsley Dr., New

City, NY. 13214 [22] Filed: July 14, 1972 [21] Appl. N0.: 271,769

{52] US. Cl. 128/91 R, 128/83 [51] Int. Cl. A61f 5/04 [58] Field of Search 128/91, 90, 89, 87, 84, 128/83, 82

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,643,656 2/l972 Young l28/90 FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 657,4l9 2/l963 Canada ,.L 128/90 327,909 2/1958 Switzerland l28/90 Primary E.raminer- Richard A. Gaudet Assistant Examiner-J. Yasko Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Gottlieb, Rackmun & v

Reisman [57] ABSTRACT There is disclosed an edge wrapping for use in making casts. A strip of material is wrapped around each end of the part to be casted; thereafter, a soft lining and the cast material are applied, and the free edge of each strip is folded back and embedded in the cast material. By using edge wrapping strips, as opposed to the conventional cylindrical wrapping (commonly called stockinette), the disadvantages of the latter are avoided and a number of advantages are obtained.

7 Claims, 12 Drawing Eigures EDGE WRAPPING FOR CASTS AND METHOD FOR USING SAME This invention relates to casts such as are used in orthopedics and other fields of medicine, and more particularly to edge wrapping therefor.

The conventional practice in making a cast includes the initial step of rolling a cylinder of material commonly referred to as stockinette, onto the desired area. The stockinette, which is a unitary, open-ended, cylindrically shaped element serves to provide an edge at each end of the cast. After the stockinette isplaced over the part to be casted, a soft lining'material is applied over the stockinette, such that a length of stockinette is left free at either end. The lining serves as a padding and consists of cotton or similar material. The plaster is then applied over the lining, and the free ends of the stockinette can be rolled back over the ends of the plaster and then incorporated in the cast by subsequent application of more plaster. This prevents the edges of the cast from digging into the patients skin, provides firm edges, and makes the cast neat in appearance.

However, the portion of the stockinette along the main central length of the cast serves little useful function. In fact it has many disadvantages. Because the stockinette can adhere to the skin, it makes removal of the cast more difficult. The stockinette is not highly absorbent and it therefore causes perspiration to accumulate under it, causing itchiness and general discomfort. The stockinette is also instrumental in prolonging the time required to apply the cast, and it may also cause the patient considerable pain as it is. rolled over a tender area. The conventional stocking type material is produced in only certain predetermined circumferences, so that when applied onto the desired area it may fit poorly. It it is too tight there may not only be discomfort to the patient but there may also be restriction of blood and lymphatic circulation. If the stockinette is too loose, it may wrinkle, which in turn can cause skin irritation, discomfort and possibly ulceration.

It is a general object of my invention to overcome the aforesaid shortcomings of prior art techniques for making casts.

It is another object of my invention to provide an edge wrapping for casts which, in addition to not exhibiting the prior art shortcomings, offers certain positive advantages when used.

It is another object of my invention, in one embodiment thereof, to provide a combination edge wrapping and splint in order to simplify the making of a cast for a part requiring a splint.

In accordance with the principles of my invention,I utilize a strip of cloth, gauze, plastic, paper material, etc. at each of the two ends of the cast for the purpose of providing an edge wrapping. Unlike the prior art, the central portion of the part to which the cast is applied is not covered by the material, nor is a cylindrically shaped element utilized. Each edge wrapping consists simply of a piece of material which can be cut to a length approximately equal to the circumference of the part to which it is being applied. (Similarly, an edge wrapping may also be used wherever there is an opening in the cast to allow the cast to conform to the part to which it is being applied, e.g., at the opening for the thumb in the case of an arm cast.) The edge wrapping 2' isapplied in essentially a full turn, and may be held in place by adhesive material which may be part of the wrapping, or it may be held in place by a binding such as tape, etc. The conventional cotton or cotton-like material is placed around the desired area after the edge wrappings have been applied. The plaster is then applied, with the edge wrapping at each end being turned back over the end of the cast and incorporated in it as is conventional practice when a stockinette is used. The edge wrapping of my invention overcomes all the prior art disadvantages enumerated above.

In one embodiment of the invention, I provide a strip of compressible material such as foam rubber, dense cotton, flannel, etc. secured to each edge wrapping piece along a line approximately at its center. (The edge wrapping of my invention can be supplied in rolls as is the conventional surgical gauze. The same is true even when the additional central strip is provided.) When a length of the edge wrapping is cut, it is placed on the part to be casted as before, with the central strip separated from the patients skin by the wrapping. The central strip is of such a width that part of it encircles the patients limb (or other part being immobilized), and part of it covers the edge of the padding and plaster when folded back. The additional strip at each end of the cast serves not only as a cushion for the cast, but as a seal, by virtue of the compressed material and adhesive (if provided) between wrapping and skin, to prevent foreign materials, including liquids, from being introduced into the space between skin and lining.

In another embodiment of my invention, the edge wrapping has attached to it, or incorporated in it, a piece of firm material to provide support, e.g., to act as a splint, for the toes or the fingers. The edge wrapping material is configured so that part of it can be turned back to form an edge for the cast from which the splint extends. The major advantage of providing a unitary edge wrap-splint combination is that it permits making a cast including a splint in one operation.

Further objects, features and advantages of the invention will become apparent upon consideration of the following detailed description in conjunction with the drawing in which;

FIG. 1 depicts a prior art cast applied to the arm of a patient;

FIG. 2 is a sectional view through the line 2-2 of FIG. 1 in the direction of the arrows;

FIG. 3 depicts a cast made in accordance with the principles of my invention applied to the arm of a patient;

FIG. 4 is a sectional view through the line 4-4 of FIG. 3 in the direction of the arrows;

FIG. 5 depicts a preferred form of edge wrapping material which is provided with a sealing and/or cushioning strip along the center thereof;

FIG. 6 is a fragmentary sectional view of a cast made using the edge wrapping material of FIG. 5;

FIG. 7 depicts a combined splint and edge wrap which can be used in making a cast for the foot; and

FIGS. 8-12 depict successive stages of formation of a foot cast using the combined edge wrap and splint of FIG. 7.

The first step in making the prior art cast 18 of FIGS.

1 and 2 is to apply stockinette 20 on the patients arm 16. Most of the stockinette, as symbolized by the numeral 20a, bears against the patients arm after the east is applied; it is only the ends 20b of the stockinette which are folded back to form the edges 200 for the cast. After the stockinette is placed on the patients arm, cotton 22 or similar padding material is applied around it, following which the actual cast material 24 (e.g., plaster of Paris) is applied around the cotton or similar padding material in layered form. After the initial layers of the plaster material are applied, the ends 20b of the stockinette are folded back, and they are then covered by the additional layers of plaster material which are applied. As seen in FIGS. 1 and 2, the stockinette forms a cuff-like edge at each end of the cast.

To make the cast 30 of FIGS. 3 and 4 in accordance with my invention, 1 do not use a stockinette of predetermined diameter. Instead, a strip of cloth or pliable material such as paper, plastic, etc. 32 is wrapped around the patients arm 16 in the vicinity of each end of the cast to be made. The length of each strip approximates the circumference of the patients arm in the vicinity where it is applied, and each strip may be held in place on the arm by an adhesive or by a strip of tape (not shown). Thereafter, the rest of the cast is made in the same way as is the cast 18 of FIGS. 1 and 2. The major difference between cast 30 and cast 18 is that in the former there is no stockinette material surrounding the patients arm except underneath the two ends of the cast. A little less than half of each piece of edge-wrap material, symbolized by the numeral 32a, bears against the patients arm, and a little less than half of the material, symbolized by the numeral 32b, is embedded in the cast material. The remainder of the material 32 forms a cuff-like edge 32c. Between the edge pieces, cotton 22 is in contact with the patients skin 16.

There are several advantages in using two lengths of edge wrapping material rather than a cylindrical stockinette. The edging of my invention is easier to apply because it does not have to be rolled over the entire area to be immobilized; it need only be wrapped around the two regions of the patients arm in the vicinity of the ends of the cast to be formed. It is also easier to remove the cast when that is required because, unlike the prior art, it is not necessary to cut the stockinette and possibly cause pain to the patient in the process. Cotton 22, which is in contact with most of the skin beneath the cast, is more absorbent than the stockinette type material, and therefore there is less accumulation of perspiration on the skin. Also, since the edge wrapping is cut to suit the circumferential length to which it is being applied, the resulting fit, when properly executed, is a close match. Prior art stockinettes have predetermined diameters which may not precisely fit the part.

One problem with the prior art cast of FIGS. 1 and 2 is that foreign material often enters under the cast at its edges, i.e., between stockinette material 20 and skin 16. Such material can cause irritation and at times significant soft tissue damage as it bears against the skin under the cast. The patient generally has no way of relieving such irritation. This problem can be overcome by utilizing an edge wrapping such as that shown in FIGS. 5 and 6. Along the center line of the edge wrapping 36 there is a strip 38 of foam rubber or other such compressible material which can form a seal around the ends of the cast, or at openings in the cast, and the patients skin. When the cast is made, the edge map ping is first placed around the part to be immobilized in the vicinity of the ends of the cast or where there is an opening in the cast, with the foam rubber seal 38 or similar compressible material separated from the patients skin by the wrapping material. After cotton 22 is applied (see FIG. 6) followed by the initial layer or layers of plaster 24, the outer edge 36b of the edge wrapping is folded back and embedded in the plaster; additional plaster layers may then be applied. In addition to cuff 360, there results a circumferential seal of compressible material which prevents penetration of liquids and other foreign materials into the cast. An adhesive can also be part of the wrapping in contact with the patients skin to further insure the prevention of material entering the space between the patients skin and the lining of the cast. The adhesive material also is useful in holding the edge wrapping in place when initially applying it to the desired areas.

FIG. '7 depicts a combined edge wrapping and splint 50. Splint 56 is made of firm rubber or similar material and may have a soft absorbent material (not shown) on that part of the splint which is in contact with the patients skin. The splint serves to support the toes (or the fingers in the case of an arm or hand cast) of a patient being fitted with a cast requiring a splint in addition to the cast. The edge wrapping material 52 is fixed to splint 56 (e.g., by adhesive), or the edge wrapping material and splint may be made in one unit. The edge wrapping material is provided with two slits 54 which serve to define two foldable edges 52a. The slits allow the edges to be folded back as will be described below. The splint 56 can be cut to conform exactly to the specifications required, i.e., it may be cut to conform to one, two, three, or all fingers and toes. It may also be cut to end precisely at the tips of the fingers or toes, or to extend for a distance beyond the tips. The splint may also be made of or have incorporated into it a malleable material to allow it to be molded to the curvature of the fingers or toes to allow for further protection or immobilization. The malleable material in the splint may also be used to form a curled edging around the tips of the fingers or toes for further protection, and may be used to support that portion of the foot or hand with which it comes in contact. The resultant support has the additional effect of making the cast more comfortable. Adhesive material 52d is used to hold the edge wrapping in place.

In the first step of making a cast for the foot, shown in FIG. 8, the splint 56 is placed under the patients foot 60 and the edge wrapping material 52 is wrapped around the patients foot as shown. Thereafter, cotton 22, or similar soft material is placed around the patients foot as shown in FIG. 9, followed by the application of plaster material 24, as shown in FIG. 10. After the first layers of plaster have been applied, edges 52a are folded back over the plaster, as symbolized by arrow 64 in FIG. 11. Provision of slits 54 allows the edges of the strip to be folded back even though the splint is secured to the strip. Finally, as shown in FIG. 12, additional plaster 24 is applied so that the edges 52a of the wrapping are embedded therein. This results in portion 52b of the edge wrapping being in contact with the skin, and portion 520 forming a cuff as previously described. The upper end of the cast of FIGS. 8-12 is not shown, but it can be made by using an edge wrapping strip as shown in FIG. 5. The major advantage of the combined edge wrapping and splint 50 of FIG. 7 is to minimize the time required for applying a splint in that one can utilize a single element for both providing support for the patients foot, toes, hand or fingers, and an edge wrapping for the cast.

Although the invention has been described with reference to particular embodiments, it is to be understood that these embodiments are merely illustrative of 5 the application of the principles of the invention. For example, a strip of foam rubber or other compressible material can be used in the combined edge wrap and splint of FIG. 7 to provide the seal discussed in connection with the embodiment of FIG. 5. It is also contemplated that the edge wrapping of FIG. 5 could be proangled rib which would stand upright from that part of the patient to which the cast is being applied and which would define a cast edge. In general, by providing an edge wrap at each end of the cast, my invention provides no separation between the absorbing cotton layer and the patients skin along the major length of the cast as was required in the prior art by reason of a nonfunctional stockinette or any other type of material. The edge wrap of my invention is easier to apply and to remove than the stockinette of the prior art. It also may be modified to prevent the entrance of foreign material between the cast and skin, which was lacking in the prior art. It also may be modified to provide a splint which can be used in conjunction with a cast, and it can be provided with a flange to define the edges of the cast and make the application of the cast easier. Thus, it is to be understood that numerous modifications may be made in the illustrative embodiments of the invention and other arrangements may be devised without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention.

What I claim is:

l. A method of making a cast comprising the steps of:

a. wrapping a length of edge wrapping material around at least one area of a patients body part at which an end of the cast is to be formed,

b. applying a layer of absorbent material around and in contact with the patients body part and which partially covers said length of edge wrapping material,

c. applying a layer of hardenable material around said absorbent material, and I d. folding back the uncovered edge of said length of edge wrapping material and embedding it in said layer of hardenable material.

2. A method of making a cast in accordance with claim 1 wherein said length of edge wrapping material has a sealing strip attached thereto along its length in the central region thereof, which sealing strip is made to bear against the patients body part in step (a) in the vicinity of said one end of the cast to be formed.

3. A method of making a cast in accordance with claim 1 wherein a splint is secured to said length of edge wrapping material which extends beyond that edge of the length of edge wrapping material which is folded back in step (d) to provide support for at least a portion of the body part for which the cast is being made.

4. A method for making a cast in accordance with claim 3 wherein said length of edge wrapping material includes two slits on opposite sides of said splint for alloying part of said length of edge wrapping material to be folded back in step (d).

5. A cast comprising a length of edge wrapping material adapted to be wrapped around at least one area of a patients body part at a respective end of the cast, a layer of absorbent material adapted to be placed around and in contact with the patients body part and which partially covers said length of edge wrapping material, and a layer of hardenable material around said absorbent material, the edge of said length of edge wrapping material which is not covered by said absorbent material being folded back and embedded in said layer of hardenable material.

6. A cast in accordance with claim 5 wherein said length of edge wrapping material has a sealing strip attached thereto along its length in the central region thereof, which sealing strip is adapted to bear against the patients skin in the vicinity of said one end of the cast.

7. A cast in accordance with claim 5 wherein a splint is secured to said length of edge wrapping material which extends beyond that edge of the length of edge wrapping material which is folded back to provide support for the portion of the body part surrounded by the cast.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3643656 *16 Jun 196922 Feb 1972Joseph V YoungInflatable surgical cast
CA657419A *12 Feb 1963George J PikeImmobilizing orthopedic structures and methods of preparing same
CH327909A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4235228 *27 Jul 197925 Nov 1980Medical Specialties, Inc.Orthopedic cast material
US4308862 *6 Feb 19805 Jan 1982Irene KalmarPlaster cast
US4381769 *21 Aug 19813 May 1983Ipos Gesellschaft Fur Integrierte Prothesen-Entwicklung Und Orthopadietechnischen Service Mbh & Co. KgProtective element for producing the closure edges of plaster bandages on the human body, and a plaster bandage made using such protective member
US4532922 *5 Mar 19846 Aug 1985Vladimir GolyakhovskyDevices and method for correct application of plaster dressings to treat fractures and dislocations
US4945903 *28 Apr 19897 Aug 1990Max AlperFor protecting an injured body part
US4989593 *22 Jul 19885 Feb 1991Minnesota Mining & Manufacturing CompanyWaterproof; treated with fluoropolymer or silicone
US5016622 *4 Apr 199021 May 1991Jean NorvellWater impermeable, water vapor permeable orthopedic cast
US5042465 *1 Feb 199127 Aug 1991Minnesota Mining & Manufacturing CompanyApplying padding to body part; impregnating with curable resin; waterproof
US5394831 *3 Dec 19927 Mar 1995Babson Bros. Co.Resistance milk flow sensor
US5409448 *15 Jul 199325 Apr 1995Parker Medical AssociatesEasily removed tubular cast assembly, and method for removing a cast
US5637077 *30 Oct 199510 Jun 1997Smith & Nephew Casting, Inc.Custom-molded ankle brace
US5755678 *13 Oct 199526 May 1998Parker; A. BruceCustom-fitted body protective device with variable reenforcement
EP0229779A1 *30 May 198629 Jul 1987Isopedix CorporationOrthopedic cast system
Classifications
U.S. Classification602/11
International ClassificationA61F13/04
Cooperative ClassificationA61F13/04
European ClassificationA61F13/04