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Publication numberUS3766097 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication date16 Oct 1973
Filing date9 Aug 1971
Priority date9 Aug 1971
Publication numberUS 3766097 A, US 3766097A, US-A-3766097, US3766097 A, US3766097A
InventorsP Rosmarin
Original AssigneeP Rosmarin
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Detergent (soap) compositions
US 3766097 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent'O 3,766,097 DETERGENT (SOAP) COMPOSITIONS Philip F. Rosmarin, 200 E. 66th 'St., New York, N.Y. 10021 7 No Drawing. Filed Aug. 9, 1971, Ser. No. 170,372 .Int. Cl. Clld 1/12, 1/72, 1/83 U.S. Cl. 252-552 28 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A composition useful for the manufacture of a detergent Composition evidencing unusual emollience and skin cleansing action consists essentially of about -15% by weight beeswax, 5-15% by weight of a polyhydric alcohol selected from the group consisting of propylene glycol and glycerin, 30-50% by weight of a poloxalene having an average molecular weight of about 11,500, poloxalene being a poly(oxyethylene)-poly (oxypropylene)-poly(oxyethylene) polymer also known as dipolyoxyethylated polypropyleneglycol ether or oxyethylene oxypropylene polymer, a block polymer of ethylene oxide and propylene oxide, and 30-50% by weight of a fatty alkyl ester isethionate. A particularly useful composition is a homogeneous solid admixture consisting essentially of about 9% by weight beeswax, 9% by weight propylene glycol, 40% by weight of poloxalene having a molecular weight of about 11,500, e.g. 'Pluronic 'F-l27, manufactured by BASF Wyandotte Corp., about 40% by weight of a coconut oil acid ester of sodium isethionate, such as Igepon AC-78, manufactured by GAF Corp., 2% by weight of a non-ionic or anionic surfactant, such as sodium lauryl sulfate, e.g. Duponol C, manufactured by E. I. du Pont de Nemours & Co., or Avirol 122, manufactured by Standard Chemical Company, about 01-10% by weight allantoin and about 0.1-1% by weight of a perfume or scenting agent.

This invention relates to compositions and methods useful for the preparation of detergent compositions, particularly detergent toilet bar compositions or aqueous liquid detergent compositions. In accordance with one embodiment this invention is directed to the preparation of detergent compositions possessing high emollience and a gentle quality when employed to cleanse the skin. In accordance with another embodiment this invention is directed to an aqueous detergent composition capable of being employed to cleanse the skin and suitable for being applied to the hair as a shampoo and the like.

Ordinary fatty acid soaps employed to cleanse the skin are irritating to the eye and are alkaline and cause the natural pH of the skin to become alkaline when employed to wash the skin. Further, many ordinary soaps or soap bars disintegrate and become soft and gelatinous upon constant use or exposure to water.

It is an object of this invention to provide a detergent composition useful for the manufacture of non-soap detergent toilet bar compositions.

It is another object of this invention to provide a detergent composition useful for the manufacture of toilet bars which, when employed to cleanse the skin provide a bland, non-eye-irritating, non-alkaline emollience as well as excellent cleansing action.

It is another object of this invention to provide a detergent toilet bar composition which is storage stable, fairly long lasting whenemployed to cleanse the skin while at the same time possessing a strong cleansing action and which provides a relatively easy removal of soil and cosmetic make-up from the skin, including the sometimes diflicult to remove water-proof mascara.

How these and other objects of this invention are achieved will become apparent in the light of the accom- "Ice panying disclosure. In at least one embodiment of the practice of this invention at leastone of the foregoing objects will be achieved.

In accordance with this invention a detergent composition possessing unusual emollience and skin cleansing action is provided by a composition which contains a substantial but minor amount by weight of beeswax, such as white beeswax. In the detergent composition in accordance with this invention the beeswax is present therein in an amount in the range of about 5-15 by weight, together with other materials, particularly other emollients and surfactants which, in combination with the beeswax, provide bulk and hardness and cleansing ability to the resulting composition.

Beeswax or yellow beeswax is a substance obtained from the honeycomb of the bee. Beeswax consists of esters of straight chain monohydric alcohols with even numbered carbon chains from C to C esterified with straight chain acids also having even numbers of carbon atoms up to C with some C 'hydroxy acids, see the Merck Index, 8th Ed., published by Merck & CO., Inc. (1968). Beeswax is yellowish to brownish yellow in color and soft to brittle, possesses a honey-like odor and a slight balsamic taste. Beeswax is substantially insoluble in water. White beeswax which is preferred as the beeswax component in the preparation of compositions in accordance with this invention is bleached yellow beeswax and is yellowish-white in color and possesses a slightly different taste than yellow beeswax but otherwise it has the same properties.

Another component of detergent compositions in accordance with this invention is a polyhydric alcohol, such as propylene glycol or glycerin. This material serves as a solvent and also as an emollient and is, like the beeswax, employed in a substantial but minor amount in the detergent compositions of this invention. Specifically, the propylene glycol or glycerin is employed in an amount in the range from about 5 to about 15% by weight of the detergent compositions.

' Another component in the preparation of the detergent compositions is poloxalene. Poloxalene is a poly(oxyethylene) poly(oxypropylene) poly(oxyethylene) polymer, a block polymer containing approximately 70% ethylene oxide and 30% propylene oxide. Preferably, the poloxalene employed in the detergent compositions of this invention has an average molecular weight of about 11,500 and a minimum melting point of about 5556 C., more or less. A suitable such poloxalene is manufactured and sold by BASF Wyandotte Corp. under the trademark Pluronic F-l27. The poloxalene employed in the detergent compositions of this invention is usually present in a substantial but minor amount, such as in an amount of about 30-50% by weight, more or less. This material in addition to being a surfactant also provides bulk and hardness to the detergent compositions.

Another component of the superior beeswax, propylene glycol and poloxalene-containing compositions in accordance with this invention is a fatty al-kyl ester isethionate. Especially preferred is the coconut acid ester of sodium isethionate. A suitable fatty alkyl ester isethionate useful in the preparation of detergent compositions in accordance with this invention is manufactured by GAF Corp. under the trademark Igepon AC-78. Like the poloxalene this material is a surfactant and is employed in substantial, usually minor amounts, such as an amount in the range from about 30 to about 50% by weight of the composition. The lather properties of Igepon AC-78 resemble those of soaps in soft water.

'Desirably, there is also incorporated in the detergent compositions of this invention a wetting agent, such as an anionic or non-ionic detergent or surfactant. This component, i.e. the wetting agent, is especially effective in minor amountsas a sudsing or lathering agent to trigger or spark suds from the detergent composition upon use in washing. It aids the release and wetting of the other components in the composition, such as thelgepon AC-78. Very many such agents are usefully employed in the subject detergent compositions. Sodium lauryl sulfate has been found to be particularly satisfactory. S dium laurylsulfate is employed in a minor amount, such as an amount in the range from about 2% to about 5% by weight, more or less, e.g. 3.3%. A suitable sodium lauryl sulfate useful in the preparation of the detergent compositions described herein is manufactured by E. I. du Pont de Nemours & Co., under the trademark Duponol C and by Standard Chemical Company under the trademark Avirol 122.

Additionally, if desired, there may also be incorporated in the detergent composition very minor amounts of additive materials, such as allantoin, bactericidal agents and the like and a perfuming or scenting agent. Usually these additives are present in a very minor amount in the range from about 0.1 to about 1-2% by weight, more or less. For example, allantoin may be usefully incorporated in an amount of about 0.25-0.5% by weight and a perfuming or scenting agent may be employed in an amount from about 0.2 to about 0.75% by weight, more or less. Other additive materials, such as coloring agents, may also be usefully incorporated or present in the finished detergent composition in effective, but minor amounts, such as an amimnt in the range 0.01 to about 1-2% by weight, more or ess.

Accordingly, a composition of a detergent material prepared in accordance with this invention is beeswax, 5- by weight, preferably 9% by weight, a polyhydric alcohol, such as glycerin or, preferably, propylene glycol, in an amount 5-15% by weight, preferably 9% by weight, a poloxalene, preferably having an average molecular weight of 11,500, in an amount in the range -50% by weight, preferably by weight, a fatty alkyl ester isethionate, such as the coconut acid ester of sodium isethionate in the range 30-50% by weight, preferably about 40% by weight, a sudsing or wetting agent, such as sodium lauryl sulfate, in the range 2-5% by weight, preferably 2% by weight. Additionally, if desired, there is incorporated in the detergent composition allantoin in an amount in the range 0.1-1.0% by weight, preferably 0.25% by Weight and a scenting agent or perfume in an amount of about 0.10 to about 2% by weight, preferably about 1% by weight.

The following is exemplary of one embodiment of the practice of this invention directed to the preparation of a detergent composition useful for the manufacture of detergent toilet bars and the like. Fifty four parts by. Weight bleached white 100% pure natural beeswax together with a substantial equal amount, about 55 parts by weight propylene glycol and about 240 parts by weight poloxalene having an average molecular weight of about 11,500, such as Pluronic F-127, were gently heated and mixed together until all solids were dissolved leaving the solution clear and transparent. Thereafter, a very minor amount of perfume, such as about 6 parts by weight perfume A-4908 manufactured by Ungerer Co. were added. Upon addition of the perfume gentle mixing or stirring of the clear molten mix was carried out to form a uniform mass without aerating the molten mass. Thereafter, finely divided, well sifted sudsing agent, such as sodium lauryl sulfate, in the amount of 12 parts by weight, allantoin in the amount of about 1.25 parts by Weight and a fatty alkyl ester isethionate, viz. Igepon AC-78 in the amount of about 235 parts by weight were added with stirring and gentle heating until all the powders were completely dispersed in the molten mix and a homogeneous molten mass formed. The temperature of the molten mix is usually at this stage about 75-80 C.

The resulting molten mass can then be poured into molds, such as toilet bar molds made of silicon rubber,

4 and allowed to cool and solidify. When cooled and solidified, the material, i.e. the solidified detergent material in the form of toilet bars; are removed from the molds and may be packed or further processed as the finished product.

If desired, instead of directly pouring the molten mix into the molds the'molt en mix may be permitted to cool and solidify in the container within which it was formed or in another container. After a suitable period of time, when desired, this relatively cool substantially solidified mass may be reheated, such as on a steam bath, and stirred until smooth and flowing andthen put into molds and permitted to cool and solidify. When these detergent bars are removed from the molds, they are in good solid form and appear to provide, when employed in cleansing, a better toilet bar, yielding a better slip feeling and improved lathering.

The aforesaid solid toilet bar detergent compositions based on the above-mentioned parts by weight contains about 9% by weight beeswax, 9% by weight propylene glycol, 40% by weight poloxalene, about 40% by Weight fatty alkylester isethionate, about 2% by weight sodium lauryl sulfate, about 1% by Weight perfume and about 0.25% by weight allantoin. These detergent bars exhibit substantially no weight loss upon storage and possess excellent stability and storage capability. It was observed that bars made up of the above-identified compositions require only a relatively very small'amount of perfume if it is desired to provide these bars with a scent, such as a floral scent. Ordinary soap bars require a substantially higher amount of perfume. The resulting toilet bars provide a bland, non-alkaline, noneye-irritating, emollient for the skin. Physically the toilet bars are hard but smooth to the touch and long lasting and when employed in washing leaves the skin with a slightly lubricated feeling. The use of the detergent bar in washing appears to prevent or reduce chapping in'cold weather and provides a powerful cleansing action. Further, in the preparation of the above-described detergent compositions in accordance with this invention no water is employed and there vided detergent composition, as described hereinabove, isprepared. This liquid detergent cleanser is prepared, for:

example, by heating 30 parts by weight of the above-described detergent composition in about 50-51 parts byweight deionized water. Three parts by weight of .polyvinylpyrrolidone K-30 manufactured by GAF Corp. are then added and the resulting admixture mixed. and heated until substantially all the solids are dissolved. At about 75 C. heating is discontinued and the resulting aqueous liquid admixture permitted to coolto about 50 C. At about that temperature an additional amount of water, about 16 parts by weight containing about 0.2 part by weight Dowicil 200, an antimicrobial manufactured by Dow Chemical Co. dissolved therein is added with continued mixing until the temperature of the aqueous admixture has dropped to about room temperature. At about room temperature an additional amount of water is added to bring the total admixture to about parts by weight. I

The resulting liquid cleanser is opaque, White in color and when lathered on wet skin produces copious suds. When applied to wet hair it foams well and cleans the hair and scalp satisfactorily. It is readily rinsed away with. water and leaves the hair and scalp free of anyresidue.

This liquid cleanser does not change. or affect the color ofthehair, particularly hair which has been dyed nor does itpstrip'dye from the hair.

' In accordance with another embodiment of the practice of this invention for the preparation of a stable aqueous liquid skin and hair cleanser, there is mixed together with heatingto about 76 C. to provide a uniform melt, 508 parts by weight deionized water, 27.5 parts by weight propylene glycol, 27 parts by weight beeswax and 119 parts by weight poloxalene, viz. Pluronic F-127. Thereafter, after a uniform melt at a temperature of about 76 C. has'been obtained, there are added 116 parts by weight of a fatty alkyl ester isethionate, viz. Igepon AC- 78, '6'parts by weight sodium lauryl sulfate, viz. Duponol C. and 0.75 part by weight allantoin. The resultion admixture is stirred with heating to a temperature of about 78 C. Thereafter, heating is discontinued and with stirring 30 parts by weight polyvinylpyrrolidone K-30 is slowly added and dispersed into the admixture. While the admixture is slowly cooling at about 50 C., 160 parts by weight deionized tap water containing about 2 parts'by weight Dowicil 200 dissolved therein is added followed by the addition of 3 parts by weight Ungerer No. 4908 perfume.

After the addition of the perfume stirring may be stopped at a temperature of about 40 C. or continued, if desired, until at about room temperautre. At the end of this operation an additional amount of the deionized tap water is added to bring the total weight of the resulting liqiud detergent admixture to 1000 parts by weight. The resulting stable liquid detergent cleanser is desirably packaged in low density polyethylene bottles or containers for storage and/ or sale.

The preparation of detergent compositions is a fairly well developed art, as evidenced by numerous U.S. patents, see US. Pats. 2,175,285, 2,356,903, 2,643,229, 2,654,913, 2,674,619, 2,677,700, 2,678,921, 3,734,870, 2,781,321, 2,858,569, 2,868,731, 2,987,484, 3,129,187, 3,186,948, and 3,481,880. Beeswax, the important and characterizing ingredient present in substantial amounts in compositions of this invention, such as amounts in the range about 5-15 by weight based on the non-aqueous components, appears to be substantially unexploited in detergent compositions. Beeswax is an important characterizing ingredient of this invention since it provides a highly desirable emolliency to the resulting detergent composition while at the same time it does not interfere with the cleansing or lathering or foaming properties of the other ingredients. Hydrocarbon or petroleum and other waxes inhibit the detergency and foaming actions of the other ingredients. For example, when paraflin or hydrocarbon waxes are employed as substitutes for beeswax in compositions in accordance with this invention the foaming ability of the resulting detergent composition is substantially eliminated. Other materials, such as bentonite, fatty acids, sugars and gums, likewise when employed in compositions of this invention as a substitute beeswax yield unsatisfactory compositions. When, however, beeswax is employed in combination with the poloxalene and the fatty alkyl ester isethionate, Pluronic F-127 and Igepon AC78, respectively, in the above-indicated proportions with respect to beeswax, there is produced a solid detergent composition which possesses the desired balance of properties, such as emolliency, detergency, lathering ability, hardness, strength, storage ability and the like. 1

The combination of the poloxalene together with the fatty alkyl ester isethionate, Pluronic F-l27 and Igepon AC78, respectively, is important in the preparation of satisfactory detergent compositions. In the preparation of the detergent compositions the poloxalene is considered primarily as a bulking and hardening material although also a surfactant. This material serves as a binder for the fatty alkyl ester isethionte Igepon AC-78. Pluronic F-127 when heated to its melting point (about 56 C.) appears to form a gel. This material is slightly water-soluble at the given concentrations, is substantially neutral in pH and provides only a low foaming capability, almost negligible. When this material is heated with propylene glycol, along with Igepon AC78, a sticky mass is formed. When, however, beeswax is incorporated or present the stickiness is avoided and there is produced upon solidification a hard, nonsticky, stable mass which possesses good cleansing properties. Accordingly, the combination of the ingredients beeswax, a solvent, such as propylene glycol and glycerin, together with a poloxalene, specifically Pluronic F-127, and a fatty alkyl ester isethionate, specifically Igepon A-78, provides the characterizing composition of the detergents of this invention.

-As indicated hereinabove glycerin may be employed in place of propylene glycol. Propylene glycol, however, is preferred. Glycerin, when employed as a substitute for propylene glycol in the preparation of detergent compositions in accordance with this invention, provides or yields a heavier melt, i.e. the detergent composition during processing is heavier in stirring and milling and even in its most fluid condition is difficult to pour. Usually it is necessary to actually physically remove the mix and to place it in the molds since it does not tend to flow readily into the molds. Additionally, the molds then required vigorous thumping or movement to make sure the molds were uniformly filled. When cooled, the glycerincontaining detergent compositions solidified and hardened normally and were easily removed from the mold and performed well during washing.

Detergent compositions which do not include glycerin or propylene glycol but which include only Igepon AC-78, Pluronic F-127 and beeswax in the amounts about 44% by weight, 44% by weight and 12% by weight, respectively, did not yield satisfactory detergent compositions from a processing point of view. Additionally, detergent compositions which did not include beeswax but which did include lauric acid 6-9%, Pluronic F-127 33-43%, Igepon AC-78 33-45% and talc 35-15%, did not provide detergent compositions having the desirable combination of physical and detergency properties of this invention. Compositions made up of 4% beeswax, 9% lauric acid, 5% mannitol, 15% talc, 33% Pluronic F-127, 33% Igepon AC-78 and 1% perfume were also prepared as well as compositions which contained only Pluronic F-127, Igepon AC-78 and mannitol. All such compositions were found to be unsatisfactory. These compositions either did not pour and were dull in appearance, were lumpy, too soft and left too much residue during use. Similarly, as indicated hereinabove, when paraffin wax was employed as a substitute for beeswax unsatisfactory results were obtained. Apparently paraffin waxes inhibit the detergency action of the Igepon AC-78 and also lower the lathering and detergency action of the resulting composition.

As mentioned hereinabove the detergent compositions both solid and liquid prepared in accordance with this invention are non-irritating. Since the detergent materials in accordance with this invention have a neutral pH in the range 6-7 and since the compositions are emollient and non-irritating as well as being effective as cleansing agents, the detergent compositions of this invention are particularly useful as hypoallergenic cleansing compositions. The fact that the detergent compositions do not irritate the eye has been established by actual use of these compositions when employed for facial cleansing. Also, animal tests have been carried out employing the Draizes Rabbit Eye Irritation Tests. These tests have established that the detergent compositions of this invention are substantially non-irritating.

Three healthy albino rabbits were employed in these tests in accordance with the procedure suggested by Dr. Draize and described in Appraisal of the Safety of the Chemicals in Foods, Drugs and Cosmetics, published by the Association of Food and Drug Ofiicials of the United States. In these tests 5 grams of the detergent composition were dissolved in 10 ml. of distilled water.

milligrams of the soap fragrance were added to this mixture, stirred well and then made up to 50 ml. with distilled Water, resulting in a 10% solution of soap and fragrance. 0.1 ml. of this mixture was instilled into the right eye of each animal with no further treatment. The untreated left eye of each animal served as the control. Both the treated and the controlled eyes were examined every 24 hours for 4 days and then on the 7th day. The results of these tests indicated that the instillation of a 0.1 ml. of a 10% mixture of the detergent of this invention and fragrance, prepared as described hereinabove, into the right eye of each of the three rabbits produced a very mild vessel injection involving only the conjunctivae but on the second day of observation the treated eyes were normal and continued so throughout the tests. In these tests an acceptable result would be a situation where any observed irritation cleared by the seventh day. In these tests only a minimal irritation involving only the conjunctivae was observed and this cleared by the second day. It was further observed that because of the lack of response by the rabbits tested the rabbits appeared not to feel any pain or stinging. Based on this observation it would appear that if when this material should enter the eyes during facial cleaning no eye irritation would be observable and this is born out by the fact that in actual use when cleaning the face with a detergent composition in accordance with this invention irritation of the eye has not been observed.

As will be apparent to those skilled in the art in the light of the foregoing disclosure, many alterations, modifications and substitutions are possible in the practice of this invention without departing from the spirit or scope thereof.

I claim:

1. A composition useful in the preparation of a detergent bar consisting essentially of about -15 by weight beeswax, 5-15 by weight of a polyhydric alcohol selected from the group consisting of propylene glycol and glycerin, 30-50% by weight of a poly(oxyethylene)- poly(oxypropylene)-poly(oxyethylene)polymer having an average molecular Weight of about 11,500 and 30-50% by weight of a coconut oil acid ester of sodium isethionate.

2. A composition in accordance with claim 1 wherein said polyhydric alcohol is propylene glycol.

3. A composition in accordance with claim 1 which additionally contains sodium lauryl sulfate in an amount in the range 25% by weight.

4. A composition in accordance with claim 1 wherein said beeswax is present in an amount of about 9% by weight, said polyhydric alcohol is present in an amount of about 9% by weight, said polymer is present in an amount of about 40% by weight, said coconut oil acid ester of sodium isethionate is present in an amount of about 40% by weight, said composition additionally containing about 2% by weight sodium lauryl sulfate.

5. A composition in accordance with claim 4 wherein said polyhydric alcohol is propylene glycol.

6. A solid, homogeneous admixture of the composition in accordance with claim 1 in the form of a bar.

7. A composition in accordance with claim 1 containing a minor amount, about 0.1-1% by weight, of a perfume.

8. A composition in accordance with claim 1 which contains a minor amount of allantoin in the range from about 0.05% to about 0.50% by weight.

9. A liquid detergent composition consisting essentially of the composition of claim 1 dispersed in water.

10. A liquid detergent composition consisting essentially of the composition of claim 2 dispersed in water.

11. A liquid detergent material consisting essentially of the composition of claim 1 dispersed in water, said composition making up from about 20 to about 50% by weight of said liquid detergent material.

12. A liquid detergent material consisting essentially of the composition of claim 1 dispersed in water, said composition making up about 30% by weight'of said liquid detergent material. I 13'. A finely divided particulate solid homogeneous admixtureof the composition in accordance'with claim 1. 14. A finely divided particulate solid homogeneous admixture of the composition in accordance withclaim 2. 15. Amethod for the'preparation of a; composition useful in the manufacture of a detergent bar and other detergent materials which comprises forming a molten admix-. ture of beeswax, a polyhydric alcohol selected from the: group consisting of propylene glycol and glycerin'and a poly(oxyethylene) poly(oxypropylene) -poly(oxyeth-, ylene) polymer having an average molecular weight of about 11,500, adding to the resulting molten admixture. finely divided coconut oil acid ester of sodium isethionate and sodium lauryl sulfate with heating to form a homogeneous admixture and permitting the resulting-homoge-i neous admixture to cool and solidify, the aforesaid ingrei dients in the resulting cooled, solidified homogeneous'admixture being present in the following percents by weight, beeswax 515%, polyhydric alcohol 515%, polymer 30 50%, coconut oil acid ester of sodium isethionate 30-50% and sodium lauryl sulfate 2--5%.

16. A method in accordance with claim 15.wherein said;

polyhydric alcohol is propylene glycol. 17. A method in accordance with claim. 15 wherein the resulting cooled solidified homogeneousadmixture. is reheated until smooth and flowing, poured into inolds" and then permitted to cool and solidify. I 18. A method in accordance with claim 15 wherein the resulting cooled solidified homogeneous. admixture is broken up and finely divided and dispersed in water to. form a liquid detergent composition. f

19. A method in accordance with claim 18 wherein the resulting formed liquid detergent composition comprisesfrom about 20 to about 50% by weight of said solidified homogeneous admixture.

20. A method in accordance with claim 18 wherein.

the resulting formed liquidv detergent composition comprises about 30% of said solidified homogeneous admixture.

21. A method in accordancewith 'claim 17 wherein said 2 polyhydric alcohol is propylene glycol. 4

22. A method in accordance with claim 18 wherein said polyhydric alcohol is propylene glycol.

23. A method for the preparation of a stable aqueous liquid detergent composition which comprises heating with stirring an admixture of water, a polyhydric alcohol selected from the group consisting of propylene glycol and glycerin, beeswax and a poly(oxyethylene)-poly (oxy-.-

propylene)-poly(oxyethylene) polymer having an average molecular weight of about 11,500 to form a uniformly liquid admixture, adding to the resulting formed liquid admixture coconut oil acid ester of sodium isethionate and sodium lauryl sulfate to form a uniform aqueous admixture and incorporating additional water into the resulting uni-I form aqueous admixture, the water being present in the resulting aqueous liquid detergent composition in the range 50-80%, the percentages by weight-of the" components making up the remainder and based on said remainder being.5-15% beeswax, 515% polyhydric alcohol,'30

50% said polymer, 3050% coconut oil'acid ester of sodium isethionate and 2'5 sodium lauryl sulfate.

24. A method in accordance with claim 23 wherein said polyhydric alcohol is propylene glycol."

25. A method in accordance with claim 23 wherein said heating with stirring of said admixture of water, poly hydric alcohol and said polymer is carried out to a tem perature of about 75-78" C lauryl sulfate are added at a about 75-78 C.

27. A method in accordance with claim 23 wherein there is incorporated in said uniform aqueous admixture a minor amount by weight of polyvinyl pyrrolidone as a viscosity increasing agent, said polyvinyl pyrrolidone being incorporated therein in an amount such that the percentage by weight of said polyvinyl pyrrolidone in said remainder is about 3%.

28. A method in accordance with claim 23 wherein said additional water is incorporated in the resulting aqueous admixture after cooling said aqueous admixture to a temperature of about 50 C.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 'Duncan 252-550 Becher 252-117 Dupuy 264-160 Henderson et a1 252-117 Geitz 252-121 10 Lundberg et al 252-174 Meehan 252-155 Hooker 252-544 Haass et al. 252-117 Kamen et a1 252-121 FOREIGN PATENTS Great Britain. Great Britain.

US. Cl. X.R.

252-550, 557, Dig. 16

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
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US4211675 *17 Jan 19798 Jul 1980Lever Brothers CompanyAcyl isethionate, sucrose ester
US4231904 *26 Feb 19794 Nov 1980Lever Brothers CompanyDetergent bars with improved properties
US4790956 *29 Jun 198713 Dec 1988Mazer Chemicals, Inc.Containing water and water-soluble ethoxylated monohydril alco hol
US5017302 *15 Aug 198921 May 1991Colgate-Palmolive CompanyCetyl, myristyl, stearyl alcohol
US5256396 *24 Jan 199026 Oct 1993Colgate-Palmolive CompanyTopical composition
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Classifications
U.S. Classification510/155, 510/418, 510/416, 510/497, 510/128, 510/159, 510/506, 510/505
International ClassificationC11D3/384, C11D1/722, C11D1/12, C11D3/20, C11D17/00
Cooperative ClassificationA61K2800/596, A61K8/345, A61Q5/02, C11D1/722, A61K8/466, C11D17/006, A61K8/90, C11D3/2044, A61Q19/10, A61K2800/75, A61K8/463, A61K8/927, C11D3/384, C11D1/126
European ClassificationC11D3/20B2A, C11D17/00H6, C11D3/384, C11D1/722, C11D1/12D, A61K8/46F, A61K8/90, A61K8/34D, A61K8/46C, A61Q5/02, A61K8/92H, A61Q19/10