Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3736939 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication date5 Jun 1973
Filing date7 Jan 1972
Priority date7 Jan 1972
Publication numberUS 3736939 A, US 3736939A, US-A-3736939, US3736939 A, US3736939A
InventorsG Taylor
Original AssigneeKendall & Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Balloon catheter with soluble tip
US 3736939 A
Abstract
A flexible retention catheter of the balloon inflation type is provided with an auxiliary drainage opening in the wall of the catheter, situated below the inflation balloon, and with an imperforate tip composed of a material which is soluble in body fluids. During insertion, drainage is initiated only through the auxiliary opening. Upon dissolution of the tip, the whole diameter of the lumen of the catheter becomes available for drainage.
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

9 1: 1 United StHtES 310111 I 1 1111 3,730,939

Taylor 1 June 5, 1973 541 BALLOON CATHETER WITH 2,603,217 7/1952 McShirley A ..128/239 SOLUBLE TIP 2,936,760 5/1960 Gants a v128 349 B 2,930,377 3/1960 Cowley 1 128/344 Inventor? Glen" Taylor, Barrlngwn 3,428,046 2 1969 Remer et a1. ..128/349 R [73] Assignee: The Kendall Company, Walpole, OTHER PUBLICATIONS Brit. Med1lourn. 25 Feb. 1967 pg. 485 [22] Filed: Jan. 7, I972 [2]] Appl NO: 216,230 Primary Examiner-Dalt0n L. 'lruluck Att0rney.lohn F. Ryan Related US. Application Data [63] Continuation of Ser. No. 1,471, Jan. 8, 1970, aban- [57] ABSTRACT dolled, Continuation-impart of Set A flexible retention catheter of the balloon inflation 221 1970 abandonedtype is provided with an auxiliary drainage opening in the wall of the catheter, situated below the inflation [52] US. Cl. ..I28/349 B, 128/239, 128/246 baummy and with an imperforate tip Composed of a [5 31. Cl. material which is soluble in fluids During insep [58] Flew 3 Search 349 349 tion, drainage is initiated only through the auxiliary B49 350 239 246 opening. Upon dissolution of the tip, the whole diame- References Cited tier of the lumen of the catheter becomes available for rainage. UNITED STATES PATENTS 1 Claim, 1 Drawing Figure 871,474 11/1907 Buckner ..128/239 801,924 10/1905 Shiley ..128/24O BALLOON CATHETER WITH SOLUBLE TIP This is a continuation of application Ser. No. 1,471, filed Jan. 8, 1970, which is a continuation-in-part of U. S. Ser. No. 692,853, filed Dec. 22, 1970, both now abandoned.

This invention relates to surgical retention catheters, and more particularly to catheters provided with an imperforate, transient, water-soluble tip.

Conventional catheters of the balloon-inflated retention type are generally provided at one end with a rounded tip or head containing one or more elongated openings to allow for the drainage of body fluids through the catheter. These drainage openings in the tip of the catheter are limited in size, since the larger they are, the more they tend to decrease the rigidity and resistance to distortion of the tip. Ideally, the insertion tip of a catheter should be as resistant to distortion as the body portion thereof, to resist doubling over upon insertion, with consequent discomfort and pain to the patient.

As a result of this physical limitation on the size of the openings in the catheter tip, the drainage of viscous fluids is imped ed. Furthermore, sediment or fragments of tissue may accumulate in and around the eyelets or openings, with a slowing down or even complete stoppage of the drainage function.

Ideally, once the catheter is in place, it would be desirable to utilize the maximum drainage capacity of the catheter by hailing the end of the catheter open and untipped. Open-end catheters have been proposed wherein the tipless open end of the catheter tube is provided with inserted reinforcing strips of lateximpregnated fabric, as in U. S. Pat. No. 2,677,375. However, such catheters do not have a smoothly rounded tip, so that an unprotected and uncovered edge of the tube end comes in contact with the passage through which the catheter is being threaded, with the danger of injury to the patent.

It has also been proposed to provide irrigation devices with tips which become soluble in aqueous fluids. However, all of such devices known to me have soluble tips which are perforate, in that they contain one or more drainage openings in the tip itself. Such devices are not well-suited to function as retention catheters of the balloon inflation type, since as soon as the perforate tip enters the bladder, drainage will begin. The nurse will then inflate the retention balloon, which may or may not be situated in the desired position inside the bladder and resting against the bladder wall. If the balloon is still in the upper portion of the urethral canal, its inflation is accompanied by extreme discomfort to the patient.

It is an object of this invention to provide a retention catheter of the balloon inflation type which can be inserted with maximum ease and lack of discomfort and which, once in place, offers maximum drainage capacity, and which minimizes the danger of premature inflation.

It is a further object of this invention to provide a retention catheter with a rounded, imperforate atraumatic tip which is capable of dissolving in body fluids.

The invention will be better understood with reference to the following description and drawing, in which:

FIG. 1 is a cross-sectional view of the catheter of this invention.

Referring to FIG. 1, there is shown an inflation catheter with a flexible body portion comprising sidewalls l212, of conventional construction, surrounding the drainage lumen 11. The insertion end of the catheter is provided with a tightly fitting rounded imperforate tip 10 formed from a substance which is firm and resilient when dry, but is capable of softening and dissolving in body fluids such as urine.

The catheter of this invention is of the inflation balloon type, wherein the drainage lumen 11 is provided with an inflation wall channel 22, said channel having the conventional angularly disposed inflation connection, not shown, by means of which fluid is transmitted through the channel and the communicating opening 20 to inflate the balloon l8, situated near the distal end of the body of the catheter and sealed thereto, said balloon and inflation lumen being well-known and conventional.

The catheter is also provided with an auxiliary drainage opening 24 in the wall 12, opening directly into the main drainage lumen 11. Such an opening assists in the drainage of small subnatant pockets of body fluids which may accumulate when the inflation of the balloon walls 18 causes the open tip of an indwelling catheter to project an appreciable distance beyond, for instance, the wall of the human bladder. More importantly, as the catheter is being inserted, the actual soluble tip of the catheter is closed, and drainage can begin only through this auxiliary opening 24. Thus, during the insertion process, the initiation of drainage is a sure sign to the nurse that the balloon portion of the catheter is inside the bladder, and that inflation can be safely carried out without discomfort to the patient.

The imperforate water-soluble catheter tip 10 should fit snugly and firmly over the open end of the catheter tube. It is, however, generally of thinner wall construction than the walls 12 of the catheter, a wall thickness of 2-5 mils facilitating satisfactorily rapid disintegration when the tip is immersed in, for example, urine. It may be fashioned from any suitable substance which has the property of forming a solid film capable of softening and dissolving in aqueous fluids, such as gelatin, methyl cellulose, polyvinyl alchol, polyethylene oxide, polyvinyl pyrrolidone, and the like. These may be-used alone, or in combination with water-soluble non-toxic plasticizers such as various glycols, to obtain the desired combination of flexibility and disintegration time. The substance chosen preferably will disintegrate and dissolve substantially completely when immersed in an aqueous fluid of pH 5 to 8 for a period of not more than 5 minutes.

The use of a catheter with'an imperforate tip soluble in body fluids is especially advantageous when occasional irrigation is to be carried out. In such proce' dures, substantial amounts of cellular debris and disconnected fragmented tissue are frequently dislodged which do not pass freely through the eyes of a conventional cather tip, but tend to collect in and around the eyes to impede or occlude the desired drainage function.

Having thus described my invention, 1 claim:

1. A flexible retention catheter of the balloon inflation type which comprises a flexible tubular body portion with an inflatable balloon sealed to said body near its distal end, said body portion having an open end beyond said balloon,

whereby the open end of the tubular body portion is covered during insertion of the catheter, the unobstructed auxiliary drainage opening will permit drainage of liquid as a signal to the operator of the catheter that the balloon and distal end are properly located before the balloon is inflated, and after the balloon is inflated to secure the catheter in proper position, the imperforate tip portion is dissolved to permit normal drainage.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US801924 *16 Dec 190417 Oct 1905Sylvester B ShileySyringe-nozzle.
US871474 *21 Jan 190719 Nov 1907William Thomas BucknerSyringe.
US2603217 *22 Nov 194915 Jul 1952 mcshirley
US2930377 *2 Jun 195829 Mar 1960Baxter Don IncSurgical tube
US2936760 *10 Sep 195617 May 1960Davol Rubber CoPositive pressure catheter
US3428046 *6 Apr 196518 Feb 1969Vagenius Harold NCatheter
Non-Patent Citations
Reference
1 *Brit. Med. Journ. 25 Feb. 1967 pg. 485
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3889686 *26 Jun 197317 Jun 1975Hoswell Vicki LorraineCatheter tube
US4143651 *3 Nov 197713 Mar 1979The Kendall CompanyCatheter
US4292976 *8 Aug 19796 Oct 1981Banka Vidya SRight ventricular injection catheter; right ventricular angiographic method; and method of monitoring septal wall motion
US4315509 *16 Oct 197816 Feb 1982Smit Julie AInsertion and removal catheters and intestinal tubes for restricting absorption
US4349029 *16 Jun 198014 Sep 1982Mott Patricia ADrainage balloon catheter system
US4361152 *5 May 198030 Nov 1982The Kendall CompanyCatheter
US4445890 *25 Aug 19821 May 1984The Kendall CompanyCatheter
US4445891 *25 Aug 19821 May 1984The Kendall CompanyCatheter
US4447228 *25 Aug 19828 May 1984The Kendall CompanyCatheter
US4601713 *11 Jun 198522 Jul 1986Genus Catheter Technologies, Inc.Variable diameter catheter
US4683874 *7 Feb 19864 Aug 1987Angelo AcquistaBronchofiberscope
US4692152 *15 Mar 19858 Sep 1987Fresnius AgMedical tube
US4698056 *21 Mar 19866 Oct 1987Medi-Tech, Inc.Enteric feeding device
US4710181 *10 Jun 19861 Dec 1987Genus Catheter Technologies, Inc.Variable diameter catheter
US4722724 *23 Jun 19862 Feb 1988Stanley SchocketAnterior chamber tube shunt to an encircling band, and related surgical procedure
US4738666 *28 Jan 198719 Apr 1988Genus Catheter Technologies, Inc.Variable diameter catheter
US4739758 *19 May 198626 Apr 1988Criticare Systems, Inc.Apparatus for stomach cavity reduction
US4773901 *21 Feb 198427 Sep 1988C. R. Bard, Inc.Catheter with selectively rigidified portion
US4826478 *21 Aug 19872 May 1989Stanley SchocketAnterior chamber tube shunt to an encircling band, and related surgical procedure
US4827940 *13 Apr 19879 May 1989Cardiac Pacemakers, Inc.Facilitation of insertion and positioning
US4834725 *10 Mar 198730 May 1989Pfrimmer-Viggo Gmbh & Co.Catheter for percutaneous gastrostomy
US4936835 *23 Dec 198826 Jun 1990Haaga John RMedical needle with bioabsorbable tip
US4983166 *16 Apr 19908 Jan 1991Yoshiharu YamawakiBalloon catheter and method of use of the same
US5066278 *6 Aug 199019 Nov 1991Siemens AktiengesellschaftImplantable injection body
US5080655 *26 Apr 199014 Jan 1992Haaga John RMedical biopsy needle
US5181505 *28 Jun 199126 Jan 1993Lew Chel WMethod and apparatus for delivery of a medicament in the oral cavity
US5195988 *4 Nov 199123 Mar 1993Haaga John RMedical needle with removable sheath
US5254105 *10 Jun 199219 Oct 1993Haaga John RSheath for wound closure caused by a medical tubular device
US5281212 *18 Feb 199225 Jan 1994Angeion CorporationBody tissue irradiation catheter
US5330445 *1 Jul 199319 Jul 1994Haaga John RSheath for wound closure caused by a medical tubular device
US5397306 *23 Nov 199314 Mar 1995Terumo Kabushiki KaishaCatheter
US5431639 *12 Aug 199311 Jul 1995Boston Scientific CorporationTreating wounds caused by medical procedures
US5447502 *28 Mar 19945 Sep 1995Haaga; John R.Sheath for wound closure caused by a medical tubular device
US5474542 *1 Oct 199312 Dec 1995Gandi; Robert A.Catheter having imperforate protective barrier and method for making and using the same
US5477862 *14 Mar 199426 Dec 1995Haaga; John R.Cutting tip for biopsy needle
US5531783 *17 Jan 19952 Jul 1996Vitatron Medical, B.V.Pacing lead with x-ray visible soluble covering and method of inserting same into a patient's heart
US5573518 *3 Apr 199512 Nov 1996Haaga; John R.Sheath for wound closure caused by a medical tubular device
US5603698 *23 Aug 199518 Feb 1997Boston Scientific CorporationProsthesis delivery system
US5653742 *31 Oct 19955 Aug 1997Cochlear Pty. Ltd.Use of bioresorbable polymers in cochlear implants and other implantable devices
US5766201 *7 Jun 199516 Jun 1998Boston Scientific CorporationFor placing an endoprosthesis at an implantation site
US5779686 *3 Sep 199614 Jul 1998Olympus Optical Co., Ltd.Disposable medical instrument
US5830217 *9 Aug 19963 Nov 1998Thomas J. FogartySoluble fixation device and method for stent delivery catheters
US5902333 *21 Aug 199511 May 1999Boston Scientific CorporationProsthesis delivery system with dilating tip
US5935103 *18 Jul 199710 Aug 1999Heartport, Inc.Blood vessel occlusion device
US5941894 *18 Jul 199724 Aug 1999Heartport, Inc.Blood vessel occlusion device
US5984964 *31 Oct 199616 Nov 1999Boston Scientific CorporationProthesis delivery system
US5997505 *18 Jul 19977 Dec 1999Heartport, Inc.Method of cannulating an ascending aorta using a blood vessel occlusion device
US6048356 *9 Jun 199811 Apr 2000Boston Scientific CorporationExpandable catheter
US6071300 *7 Jul 19976 Jun 2000Sub-Q Inc.Apparatus and method for percutaneous sealing of blood vessel punctures
US61686023 Nov 19982 Jan 2001Thomas J. FogartySoluble fairing surface for catheters
US622461917 Sep 19961 May 2001Heartport, Inc.Blood vessel occlusion trocar having size and shape varying insertion body
US63719742 Aug 199916 Apr 2002Sub Q, Inc.Apparatus and method for percutaneous sealing of blood vessel punctures
US63910332 Jan 200121 May 2002Thomas J. FogartySoluble fixation device and method for stent delivery catheters
US642590820 Feb 200130 Jul 2002Boston Scientific CorporationExpandable catheter
US6673058 *20 Jun 20016 Jan 2004Scimed Life Systems, Inc.Temporary dilating tip for gastro-intestinal tubes
US6740273 *27 Nov 200125 May 2004Keun-Ho LeeMethod for making balloon catheter
US684632024 Sep 200125 Jan 2005Sub-Q, Inc.Device and method for facilitating hemostasis of a biopsy tract
US684923212 Mar 20021 Feb 2005Sub-Q, Inc.Exposing to a sufficient dose of E-beam irradiation to sterilize while retaining tensile strength and fluid absorbability
US68636808 Nov 20018 Mar 2005Sub-Q, Inc.System and method for delivering hemostasis promoting material to a blood vessel puncture site by fluid pressure
US6939328 *26 Feb 20036 Sep 2005Medical Components, Inc.Dissolvable subcutaneous catheter cover
US696465814 Feb 200315 Nov 2005Sub-Q, Inc.System and method for facilitating hemostasis of blood vessel punctures with absorbable sponge
US698421918 May 200110 Jan 2006Mark AshbyDepth and puncture control for blood vessel hemostasis system
US700844026 Sep 20027 Mar 2006Sub-Q, Inc.System and method for delivering hemostasis promoting material to a blood vessel puncture site by fluid pressure
US702574822 Nov 200211 Apr 2006Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc.Sheath based blood vessel puncture locator and depth indicator
US70373239 Dec 20032 May 2006Sub-Q, Inc.Pledget-handling system and method for delivering hemostasis promoting material to a blood vessel puncture site by fluid pressure
US704871011 Jul 200023 May 2006Sub-Q, Inc.System and method for facilitating hemostasis of blood vessel punctures with absorbable sponge
US717564625 Mar 200213 Feb 2007Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc.Apparatus and method for percutaneous sealing of blood vessel punctures
US719243628 May 200420 Mar 2007Sub-Q, Inc.Pledget-handling system and method for delivering hemostasis promoting material to a blood vessel puncture site by fluid pressure
US72647725 Oct 20044 Sep 2007Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc.Methods for sterilizing cross-linked gelatin compositions
US74556804 Nov 200225 Nov 2008Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc.Apparatus and method for inhibiting blood loss
US7481798 *13 May 200427 Jan 2009Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc.Devices and methods for delivering therapeutic or diagnostic agents
US761147913 Dec 20023 Nov 2009Sub-Q, Inc.System and method for facilitating hemostasis of blood vessel punctures with absorbable sponge
US761856729 Oct 200417 Nov 2009Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc.Liquid permeable foam comprising radiopaque agent for use as tool in imaging biopsies and wokund puncture sites
US762535224 Jul 20001 Dec 2009Sub-Q, Inc.Depth and puncture control for system for hemostasis of blood vessel
US78750438 Dec 200425 Jan 2011Sub-Q, Inc.Cinching loop
US805074121 Dec 20041 Nov 2011Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc.Device and method for facilitating hemostasis of a biopsy tract
US805745912 Jan 200915 Nov 2011Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc.Method for delivering therapeutic or diagnostic agents
US809241531 Oct 200810 Jan 2012C. R. Bard, Inc.Catheter assembly including triple lumen tip
US81876254 Feb 200229 May 2012Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc.Cross-linked gelatin composition comprising a wetting agent
US820637131 Oct 200826 Jun 2012Bard Access Systems, Inc.Methods and apparatus for inserting multi-lumen split-tip catheters into a blood vessel
US829284130 Mar 200923 Oct 2012C. R. Bard, Inc.Solid-body catheter including lateral distal openings
US85009392 Oct 20086 Aug 2013Bard Access Systems, Inc.Manufacture of split tip catheters
US851229020 Mar 200320 Aug 2013Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc.Devices and methods for delivering therapeutic or diagnostic agents
US852427022 May 20123 Sep 2013Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc.Cross-linked gelatin composition coated with a wetting agent
US854066122 Oct 201224 Sep 2013C. R. Bard, Inc.Solid-body catheter including lateral distal openings
US859727512 Apr 20123 Dec 2013Bard Access Systems, Inc.Methods and apparatus for inserting multi-lumen split-tip catheters into a blood vessel
US869661411 Nov 201115 Apr 2014C. R. Bard, Inc.Split-tip catheter including lateral distal openings
US880822718 Oct 200719 Aug 2014C. R. Bard, Inc.Multi-lumen catheter with separate distal tips
US882191815 Aug 20132 Sep 2014Boston Scientific Scimed Inc.Cross-linked gelatin composition comprising a wetting agent
US20120239061 *15 Mar 201120 Sep 2012Mathur Sandip VEndoscopic full thickness gastric reduction apparatus and method
WO1986007267A1 *9 Jun 198618 Dec 1986Genus Catheter TechnologiesVariable diameter catheter
WO1999002091A1 *7 Jul 199821 Jan 1999Rodney BrennemanApparatus and method for percutaneous sealing of blood vessel punctures
WO2003072182A1 *26 Feb 20034 Sep 2003J Daniel RaulersonDissolvable subcutaneous catheter cover
Classifications
U.S. Classification604/265, 604/275, 604/915, 604/96.1
International ClassificationA61F2/958, A61M25/00, A61M25/16
Cooperative ClassificationA61M25/10, A61M25/0069
European ClassificationA61M25/00T10A, A61M25/10
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
1 Feb 1989ASAssignment
Owner name: MANUFACTURERS HANOVER TRUST COMPANY, AS AGENT
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:KENDALL COMPANY, THE;REEL/FRAME:005251/0007
Effective date: 19881027