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Publication numberUS3597094 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication date3 Aug 1971
Filing date11 Aug 1967
Priority date11 Aug 1967
Publication numberUS 3597094 A, US 3597094A, US-A-3597094, US3597094 A, US3597094A
InventorsDavid G Goldwasser
Original AssigneeDavid G Goldwasser
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Portable color identification device
US 3597094 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent David G. Goldwasser 751 Marietta St. 19.12., Atlanta, Ga. 30318 660,063

Aug. 11, 1967 Aug. 3, 1971 [72] Inventor [21] AppL-No.

[22] Filed [45] Patented [54] PORTABLE COLOR IDENTIFICATION DEVICE 2 Claims, 3 Drawing Figs.

[52] U.S. Cl 356/189, 35/28.3, 35/28.5, 356/191, 356/195 [51] Int. CL G0lj 3/48, G01j 3/52,G01j 3/46 [50] Field of Search 356/173- [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,294,876 9/1942 Walker 356/73 2,871,370 1/1959 Neubrech et al.. 356/177 X 894,654 7/1908 Ives 356/174 961,852 6/1910 Fujita 356/174 2,022,326 11/1935 Sheldon 356/189 2,522,723 9/l950 Rookyard.. 35/28.5 2,597,658 5/1952 Matucci 356/189 X 2,934,l72 4/1960 Christie 356/176 X 2,953,963 9/1960 Bulkley et al. 356/174 3,340,764 9/1967 Bergson 356/177 Primary Examiner-Ronald L. Wibert Assistant Examiner-Warren A. Sklar Attorneys-George M. Thomas and Harold D. Jones, .I r.

ABSTRACT: A portable color identification device which is used with a light source and visual observation for identifying the color of a given specimen and which includes a color reflecting surface, a plurality of filter means positioned between the light source and the color reflecting surface for filtering out selected wavelengths of the light that is transmitted from the light source, and a plurality of diaphragm means for allowing the passage of light in selective varying amounts from the light source to the color reflecting surface until the color of the reflecting surface matches that of the specimen.

Patented Aug. 3, 1971 3,597,094

INVENTOR. 0/1100 fawn 455m OQ/VEYS BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention is concerned with a color identification device to determine the amounts of primary colors which are required to match the color of a given specimen. More particularly, this invention is concerned with a simplified and portable color identification device which utilizes the human eye to determine the amounts of primary colors which make up the color ofa given specimen.

There are a number of prior art devices which have been used to duplicate or match colors against a standard or specimen. Generally, the color matching devices of the prior art are very complicated and sensitive and do not utilize the physiological aspect of the human eye. The prior art generally uses machines which compute a set of numbers representing certain proportions of certain colors which are to be used to duplicate and match the color of the standard or specimen. Thus, the human eye does not observe the results of the matching color system until the resulting color has been reproduced and is on an object and then only a comparison between the standard and the matching mixture is possible. For example, it has been most difficult in the past to match the color of fabrics of a previous dye batch by the prior art devices.

In addition, many of the prior art devices have incorporated quite elaborate electrical circuits which may entail a maintenance problem, requiring the services of an electronics expert. This is not only time consuming and expensive but the elaborate electronic device is out of operation for considerable time thus resulting in further increased operating costs.

The more complicated the color matching devices, the more susceptible they are to vibrations and disturbances occasioned by normal plant operations. In an industrial plant of today, such as a fabric dye operation, it is almost impossible to keep any machine or device in a completely isolated environment. Thus, due to normal plant operations, the complicated and sensitive color matching devices of the prior art are quite susceptible to the usual operating plant conditions.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION A color indicating device for matching the color of a given specimen which includes:

1. A closed housing having wall portions;

2. A comparison screen positioned interiorly of the housing for providing a color reflecting surface;

3. A light source positioned in a light box mounted on the housing for illuminating the screen;

4. A plurality of openings defined in the wall portion between the screen and the light source;

. A diaphragm means having a selectively variable aperture therethrough associated with each of the openings to vary the amount of light through each opening from the light source;

6. A filter means associated with each of the openings and the associated diaphragm means, one of said filter means being effective to filter out all light except green wavelengths, one of said filter means being effective to filter out all light except blue wavelengths, and one of said filter means being effective to filter out all light except red wavelengths; and,

7. Lens means associated with at least two of said openings and their associated diaphragm means for directing light from an opening onto said screen.

LII

OBJECTS OF THE INVENTION The primary object of this invention is to provide a device of simple and readily portable construction which by using the human eye will successfully identify the color of a specimen for matching and other purposes.

Another object of this invention is to provide a simple device for identifying colors which will be readily operable under normal plant conditions.

A further object of this invention is to provide a device for identifying colors which is relatively simple to maintain and service.

An additional object of this invention is to provide a simple color identification device which is inexpensive to manufacture.

These and other objects, features and advantages of the present invention will be apparent from consideration of the following detailed specification taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings.

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a vertical cross-sectional view of the color identification device of the present invention; 4

FIG. 2 is a cross-sectional view of the color identification device taken along lines 2-2 in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a front elevational view of the color identification device.

DESCRIPTION OF AN ILLUSTRATIVE EMBODIMENT Referring now more particularly to the drawings, the color identification device 10 comprises a housing 11 in which the various components are placed. It is obvious that the various parts of the invention may be placed on a support in a completely dark room, but it is more efficient to place the device of this invention in an easily portable closed housing such as the housing 11. The front wall 12 of housing 11 supports a light box that serves as a light source 14 in which a conventional electric lamp l3 and mirrors 13 are positioned to direct white light into the housing 11 through three openings 15 defined in the wall 12. Three diaphragms 16 of the type having selectively variable apertures 18 therethrough such as those normally used in cameras are carried inside the housing 11, each being positioned over one of the openings 15 to selectively vary the amount of light passing therethrough from the light source 14. It will be understood that each diaphragm 16 may be replaced with a pair of polarized lenses which with rotation relative to each other will vary the amount oflight entering the housing 11 through an opening 15.

The shaft 20 of the adjustment mechanism of each diagram 16 rotatably extends through the wall 12 and receives a knob 21 thereon which is effective when rotated by the operator outside the housing 11 to vary the size of the aperture 18 so as to vary the amount of light passing from the light source 14 through the opening 15 and aperture 18 into the interior of the housing 11. A calibrated dial 22 is associated with each knob 21 so that the amount of light passing into the housing 11 through any particular opening 15 will be indicated. Although a single light source 14 is used here, it is to be understood that a plurality of light sources 14 may be utilized to produce the same result. However, it will also be understood that a single light source 14 avoids variations in the light through the openings 15 which would result for variations in a plurality of light sources. Further, the light source 14 may be placed inside the housing 11 and hooded to produce the same result.

A conventional red filter 24 is placed behind and against one diaphragm 16, a conventional green filter 25 is placed behind and against one of the other diaphragms l6, and a conventional blue filter 26 is placed behind and against the remaining diaphragm 16 to provide light from the light source 14 which is of the primary colors of red, green and blue when it enters the housing 11. It is to be understood that the filters 24, 25, and 26 may be placed in other locations as long as the light entering the housing 11 is separated into these or other primary colors necessary to provide a variety of colors upon summation.

A color reflecting screen or surface 29 of conventional design is positioned on the inside of the rear wall 28 of the housing 11 and in alignment with the light received from the centrally located opening 15. A lens 30 of conventional design, here shown as a prism, is carried interiorly of the housing 11 and in alignment with each of the openings 15 on each side of the central opening 15 for directing the light received through these openings 15 onto the screen 29.

This arrangement is effective to direct the light received from all the openings 15 onto the screen 29 to permit different colors to be projected thereon by selectively changing the size of the apertures 18 through the knobs 21. Moreover, it will be understood that each lens 30 may be selected to give a textured or other selected appearance to the color on the screen 29.

A specimen carrier 31, here shown as a door in the rear wall 28, is effective to position a specimen S of which the color is to be determined adjacent the screen 29. A secondary light source 32 is provided in the housing 11 to illuminate the specimen S and is hooded as at 34 to prevent undesired illumination of the screen 29 except from the light source 14.

In order that the operator standing outside the housing 11 can see the screen 29 and specimen S simultaneously, a viewer 35 ofcon ventional design is mounted over a viewing port 36 in the front wall 12 so that the operator can see the screen 29 and specimen S while adjusting the knobs 21 to reproduce the color of the specimen S on the screen 29. After this is done, the color of the specimen 8 can be easily reproduced since the amount of each primary color in the total color on the screen is known.

The dials 22 are premarked using a standard so that a number setting for a specific color is composed of six digits, each dial being calibrated from O to 99. Therefore, the amount of primary colors making up the color on the screen 29 will be shown by the numbers on the dials 22. For example, if each dial 22 is set on 00, then the color number setting will be 00, 00, 00 and the color will be black, no light being permitted through any of the apertures 18 of the diaphragms 16. If the color number setting on the three dials 22 is 99, 99, 99 then all of the apertures 18 are wide open and the color on the screen 29 is white. if the color number setting ofdials 22 is 99, 00, 00 with 99 being on the dial 22 of the aperture 18 through red light passes, the color on the screen 29 is that of the primary color red; if the color number setting of dials 22 is 00, 99, 00 with 99 being on the dial 22 of the aperture 18 through green light passes, the color on the screen 29 is that of the primary color green; if the color number setting of dials 22 is 00, 00, 99, the color on the screen 29 is that of the primary color blue; and if the color number setting of dials 22 is 33, 33, 33, the color on the screen 29 is gray. Thus, one is able to identify within acceptable limits of variations all colors through the manual adjustment of the three knobs 21 OPERATION In operation it will be seen that the specimen is attached to the specimen carrier 3! and the carrier 31 positioned adjacent the screen 29. The light sources 14 and 32 are illuminated in conventional manner and the operator views the screen 29 and specimen 5 through the viewer 35.

The operator then manipulates the knobs 21 until the color on the screen 29 matches the color of the specimen S. The operator then refers to the calibrated dials 22 to see what part of the total color on the screen 29 is provided by each primary color as indicated by the pointers of the knobs 21. Using this reading, the color of the specimen can be reproduced in a dye or other color producing material. Thus, by placing a color specimen to be duplicated in the device of this invention, one is able by manually controlling the amounts of reference colors such as three primary colors, to duplicate within com mercially acceptable variations, the color of the specimen for subsequent use.

It will be obvious to those skilled in the art that many variations may be made in the embodiments chosen for the purpose of illustrating the invention without departing from the scope thereof as defined by the appended claims.

lclaim: l. A color indicating device for matching the color of a given specimen comprising:

a closed housing having wall portions;

a comparison screen positioned interiorly of said housing adjacent one of said wall portions;

a specimen holder positioned adjacent said comparison screen;

means for opening said closed housing at said specimen holder for inserting and removing specimens in said specimen holder;

a single light source positioned across said housing from said comparison screen for illuminating said comparison screen;

three stationary diaphragm means in said closed housing each having a selectively variable aperture therethrough and positioned between said comparison screen and said single light source to vary the amount of light received on said comparison screen from said single light source;

a reflective surface located between at least two of said three diaphragm means and said comparison screen and positioned to reflect light from said single light source through the apertures of said diaphragm means to said comparison screens;

a colored light filter means positioned in alignment with each of said diaphragm means, one of said filter means being effective to filter out substantially all light except green wavelengths, one of said filter means being effective to filter out substantially all light except blue wavelengths, and one of said filter means being effective to filter out substantially all light except red wavelengths; and

a secondary light source positioned within said housing and arranged to illuminate said specimen holder.

2. A color identification device for determining the color characteristics of a specimen comprising:

a substantially closed housing with wall portions;

a comparison screen mounted adjacent one of said wall portions;

a specimen holder mounted adjacent said comparison screen;

a closable opening in said housing for gaining access to said specimen holder so that various different specimens can be mounted in said specimen holder;

a single light source mounted across said housing from said comparison screen;

three stationary color filtering means interposed between said light source and said comparison screen;

variable openings interposed between said light source and said comparison screen to vary the intensity of light passing from said light source to said comparison screen;

indicating means for indicating the degree of opening of said variable openings,

viewing means positioned across said housing from said specimen holder for permitting the simultaneous visual inspection of said comparison screen and a specimen mounted in said specimen holder;

and a secondary light source positioned in said housing and arranged to illuminate said specimen holder.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US894654 *22 Oct 190728 Jul 1908Frederic E IvesColor-meter.
US961852 *1 Feb 190921 Jun 1910Tamaki FujitaUniversal photometer.
US2022326 *30 Apr 193226 Nov 1935Sheldon Electric CorpApparatus for comparing color effects
US2294876 *6 May 19401 Sep 1942Walker Joseph BComparator
US2522723 *13 Oct 194819 Sep 1950Stanley M RookyardChromometer
US2597658 *8 Jul 195020 May 1952Guido MattucciColor correction gauge
US2871370 *10 Sep 195727 Jan 1959Henry A Gardner Lab IncHigh sensitivity exposure head
US2934172 *9 Mar 195526 Apr 1960Proctor & Schwartz IncLight transmissive color standard
US2953963 *19 Mar 195427 Sep 1960Standard Oil CoComparison colorimeter
US3340764 *24 Jun 196312 Sep 1967Manufacturers Engineering & EqColor measuring system using a light biased photocell
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US66145305 Nov 19992 Sep 2003Biophotonics S.A.Method and device for the colorimetric measurement of a colored surface
WO2000028289A1 *5 Nov 199918 May 2000Biophotonics SaMethod and device for the colorimetric measurement of a coloured surface
Classifications
U.S. Classification356/419
International ClassificationG01J3/46
Cooperative ClassificationG01J3/463, G01J3/501, G01J3/46
European ClassificationG01J3/46D, G01J3/46