Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3565074 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication date23 Feb 1971
Filing date24 Apr 1969
Priority date24 Apr 1969
Publication numberUS 3565074 A, US 3565074A, US-A-3565074, US3565074 A, US3565074A
InventorsFoti Philip R
Original AssigneeBecton Dickinson Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Indwelling arterial cannula assembly
US 3565074 A
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [72] Inventor Philip R. Foti FOREIGN PATENTS K Hawaii 1,092,011 11/1954 France 128/214.4 pp 31 1 1969 646,559 6/1937 Germany 128/221 g gg 1971 Primary Examiner-Dalton L. Truluclc [73] Assignee Becton, Dickinson and Company Attorney-Kane, Dals1mer, Kane, Sullivan and Kurvcz East Rutherford, NJ.

ABSTRACT: An indwelling arterial cannula assembly includes a plastic catheter coaxially removably mounted on a blunt tipped cannula having a pointed stylet removably located in the bore thereof and extended beyond the blunt tip of the cannula; and a method is provided for positioning a por- [54] INDWELLING ARTERIAL CANNULA ASSEMBLY tion of the plastic catheter of the assembly into an artery. The 10 Claims 7 Drawing Figs. method includes the steps of pro ecting the assembly into the artery by p1erc1ng both the inner and outer walls of the artery m 128,214.49 with the point of the stylet and extending a portion of the as- 128/221 sembly through the openings in both of the walls. Then the Int. C A61"! 5/00 stylet is removed from the assembly and the remainder of the [50] Field ofSearch assemlfly is retracted until its forward tip reenters the artery 10- g 348 and fluid from the artery flows through the cannula. The remainder of the assembly is then advanced into the lumen of [56] References cued the vessel to the desired position with the blunt tip of the can- UNITED STATES PATENTS nula alleviating the danger of repuncture of the inner wall of 2,389,355 1 H1945 Goland et al. l28/2l4.4 the artery. Finally, the plastic catheter is slid forward while the 3,030,953 4/1962 Koehn 128/221X cannula is removed therefrom which thereby locates a portion 3,312,220 4/1967 Eisenberg l28/2l4.4 of the catheter in the desired position in the artery.

' i 1 A 1 V 33 25 PATENTEDFEB23|91| 3565074 sumanrg INVENTOR PH/A/P .Q =p

ATTORNEYS There are several different types of arterial indwelling needles in use today; However, these needles produce various shortcomings when is use which demand the development of an improved indwelling arterial cannula assembly for application to a patient.

For example, one type of needle in use is awell-known Coumand needle. This type of needle is generally considered as the original arterial indwelling needle and it is constructed of all steel materials. Therefore, when it is placed within the lumen of a vessel which is located in a portion of the body where considerable movement occurs which is often the case, extensive damage to the vessel could occur. This happens 'quite often since this type of needleis generally placed in an area where considerable flexing by the patient would normally occur such as adjacent the elbow. Consequently, this type of needle is difficult to-leave in place for many hours or days as is often necessary.

Several other attempts have been made to produce a needle which will satisfy the requirements for providing an indwelling catheter for an artery located in a difficult position such as discussed above. For example, one combination employs a plastic catheter positioned on a pointed needle which contains a pointed stylet within its opening with the solid pointed end of the stylet being aligned with the pointed end of the needle. The difficulty with this type of arrangement is that it is very difficult to get into an artery because of the pointed cannula or needle that remains when'the stylet is removed. Trying to slide the plastic catheter and needle combination along the interior walls of the vessel particularly if the vessel is located in a difticult position such as an elbow joint will often cause repeated punctures of the vessel and considerable damage.

Another problem with this type of needle is that the stylet and the pointed cannula are generally beveled and have a common type of needle tapered" point. This presents a problem in the instance of small and thin artery walls where it is preferable to have a cleaner puncture to alleviate the danger of tearing the artery wall which of'course-causes unwanted damage and also discomfort to the patient. Of course the one feature that this type of needle assembly has that the Cournand assembly does not have is the fact that it leaves a flexible catheter in the artery instead of a stiff steel needle as in the instance of the Cournand.

A further problem which often appears with existing needle assemblies is that often the assembly does not slip easily into place within the artery once the initial puncture is made. Furthermore, there is often difficulty in sliding an obturator in and out of the plastic catheter when it is in position within the artery each time it is desired to pass fluid the through the catheter. A catheter material which will facilitate this particular step would also be advantageous in construction of the needle assembly. Once again this also provides a catheter ar- SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION Principally it is an objective of this invention to alleviate the above discussed problems existent with presently used needles and to provide a needle assembly which will achieve the above mentioned advantageous features as well as satisfying the above discussed requirements. The present indwelling arterial cannula assembly is capable of easier placement thereby providing a higher success rates in any users hands. The resultant catheter is designed so as to be more comfortable in place because of flexibility thereby avoiding patient immobilization. This allows one to leave such a catheter in place for comparatively long periods of time, for example, in an intensive care unit, The introduction of the assembly and catheter in its proper location is significantly less traumatic to the patient and the assembly is readily adaptable for use in routine pulmonary physiological studies, cardiac output determinations and monitoring, indwelling arterial electrode use for monitoring partial pressure of oxygen, and any procedure requiring easy access to intermittent arterial blood samples over an extended period of time. The technique and method of use of the assembly is easily taught and the assembly is applicable to children as well as adults.

A brief description of the structural features of the indwelling arterial cannula assembly disclosed herein and its method of application is now in order to generally point out how the above mentioned features andv objectives are obtained. An indwelling arterial cannula assembly is provided for the positioning of a portion of a plastic catheter into an artery wherein the assembly includes a plastic catheter coaxially removably mounted on ;a blunt tipped cannula having a pointed stylet removably located in the bore thereof and extending beyond the blunt tip of the cannula. The method of use of this assembly includes projecting the assembly into the artery by piercing both the outer and inner walls of the artery with the point of the stylet and extending a portion of the assembly through the openings in both walls of the artery. The stylet is then removed from the assembly and the remainder of the assembly is retracted until the forward tip thereof reenters the artery and fluid from the artery flows through the cannula.

rangement which is less traumatic and discomforting to patients.

Other features which would be advantageous in an assembly of this type would be to have the outer catheter arranged so that it has a smooth taper from its forward point to its extreme diameter to facilitate entrance within the artery. Furthermore, an assembly of smaller gauges than previously utilized would facilitate use in smaller more difficult arteries within the patient. Furthermore, a tip on the assembly which ishard as well as having the above advantages would be helpful in that it will not hang up on the artery wall when entering. This is often the problem with previously discussed assemblies of this type.

Finally, a catheter should be constructed of a material, if

The remainder of the assembly is then advanced into the lumen of the artery to the desired position with the blunt tip of the cannula alleviating the danger of repuncture of the inner wall of the artery. Finally, the plastic catheter is slid forward while removing the cannula therefrom which thereby locates a portion of the catheter in the desired position within the artery.

With the above objectives in mind, reference is had to the attached drawing for a more detailed description.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Initially, discussion will be directed'toward the cannula assembly 20 itself as attention is directed to FIGS. 1 and 2 of the drawings. Assembly 20 is composed of three basic elements, a stylet 21, a cannula 22 and a catheter 23.

Stylet 21 may be constructed of any well-known material to give it its solid properties such as a rigid metallic wire material. The forward end of the stylet 21 has a sharp pointed tip 24 to facilitate the assurance that only tiny pin holes are made in the vessel or artery of the patient during the puncture procedure. The rear end of stylet 21 has affixed thereto a hub 25 generally constructed of any common rigid material.

Cannula 22 is also a rigid member and may be constructed of any common type of rigid material, for example a metallic material such as stainless steel. The forward tip 26 of the cannula 22 is blunted and has a somewhat rounded configuration so that cannula 22 will follow stylet 21 through a puncture hole in an artery but which is not sharp enough to readily create a new puncture by itself. Mounted on the rear end of the cannula 22 by any common means or integral therewith is a hub 27. An axial bore 28 extends from the forward tip 26 of the cannula 22 to the rear end thereof and communicates with an opening 29 within hub 27 to provide a continuous passage through cannula 22. Bore 28 is designed to accommodate in close fitting relationship stylet 21 with the forward portion of hub 25 positioned within opening 29 in hub 27. When stylet 21 is thus positioned within cannula 22 the forward tip 24 thereof will extend beyond tip 26 of cannula 22 a predetermined distance. Satisfactory results have been obtained with such as assembly when stylet 21 extends approximately 4 mm. beyond the blunt tip 26 of the cannula 22. However, this is not necessarily required and this distance may be varied depending upon the individual circumstances of use for the assembly The third principal element of assembly 20 is catheter 23 which generally has a taper from its rear end to its forward tip 30. This taper is to facilitate entrance of the catheter 23 through the puncture created in an artery when assembly 20 in introduced therein as will be readily apparent below. At the rear end of catheter 23 either attached thereto by common means or integral therewith is a hub 31. An axial bore 32 extends from the tip 30 of catheter 23 rearwardly into communication with an opening 33 in hub 31 to combine therewith to form a continuous passage from one end of catheter 23 to the other. Bore 32 and catheter 23 is of a sufi'rcient size to snugly accommodate cannula 22 when assembly 20 is formed and opening 33 in hub 31 is designed to accommodate the forward portion of hub 27 of cannula 22. In this manner, stylet 21, cannula 22 and catheter 23 may be assembled in coaxial relationship to form indwelling arterial cannula assembly 20. The configuration of each hub and bore of each element contribute to an interlocking relationship between the elements in assembled form as is readily apparent from FIG. 2.

Cannula 23 is generally constructed of a plastic material, preferably flexible, which will be inert with the portions of the body with which it comes in contact and which will readily accommodate itself to the arterial configuration into which it must extend. It also must be of a material which will readily permit it to be introduced through the opening provided by tip 24 and tip 26 in the arterial walls with the minimum amount of resistance. A material which has been found to be particularly effective for use as catheter 23 is polytetrafluoroethylene which is commonly known as Teflon. As is well known in the art, Teflon is inert to the portions of the body with which it will come in contact as well as the fluids with which it will come in contact. Furthermore, Teflon being a natural lubricating material will easily follow its predecessor needle portions of the assembly into the arterial opening. Other plastic materials have been found to operate successfully, but not as successful as Teflon when fonned as catheter 23 such as polyvinyl chloride with a silicone lubricated inner bore and which is welded to hub 31. Several important features of the catheter 23 which contribute to the ease with which the assembly may be operated, is the fact that the catheter should contain a smooth taper from its rear end to its forward tip, should fit tightly on cannula 22 yet still be easily removable therefrom and the plastic employed should be such that the tip may be electromatically buffed, if desired, to increase hardness and to alleviate the danger of "hang up" of the artery wall when it enters the artery. Previously known cannula assemblies of this type have produced this problem.

The term hang up refers to a catching of the forward edge of the catheter on some portion of the artery as it is moved with respect thereto which could cause tearing of the artery structure itself in resultant damage and discomfort to the patient. Furthermore, the material used for catheter 23 should be a disposable type of material so that the assembly may be economically and easily manufactured at low cost. The above discussed materials satisfy these requirements as well as other materials which are known in the a It should be noted as can be readily seen from FIG. 2 that the smooth rather continuous engagement formed by tip 24 of stylet 21, tip 26 of cannula 22 and tip 30 of catheter 23 facilitates the entrance and movement of theassembly within the arterial area during operation. In this regard it should be pointed out that tip 30 does not extend into coincidence with tip 26 of cannula 22 but tenninates a somewhat short distance therefrom. This contributes to lessening the danger of hang up" as well as limiting the extent of tolerances required during manufacture and thereby facilitating the production of an economic cannula assembly.

Turning to the operation and use of the assembly itself, reference should be made to FIGS. 3-7 which shows the sequence of steps employed in positioning catheter 23 properly within an artery 34. A recommended technique for insertion would be as follows: Initially, the vessel to be entered should be locally anesthetized. Then if desired, scape] blade puncture of the skin is useful to avoid resistance to easy manipulation while transfixing the underlying vessel or artery.

If palpitating fingers are placed above and below the site of arterial puncture, the following procedure aids in accurate, atraumatic cannulation of the vessel, that is, to advance the long needle stylet 21 through both walls somewhat tangentially. If it is placed nearly square through the center of the lumen, slight pressure will cause the blunt metallic cannula 22 to compress the arterial wall, compromise the lumen and the distal pulse will disappear or become markedly attenuated. A release of slight pressure will bring back the pulse. This is a sure sign of proper placement and the assembly 20 may then be advanced through both the outer wall 35 and the inner wall 36 of vessel 34. If the described sign is not obtained, it is best to withdraw completely, to begin again, and only pin holes are left in vessel 34 principally due to the sharp point 24 on stylet 21.

Once vessel 34 is transfixed and the entire assembly 20 has extended through both walls of vessel 34, then stylet 21 may be removed from the assembly. The remainder of assembly 20 should then be retracted until the tip 26 of cannula 22 has reentered the vessel which will be indicated by flow of fluid being established so that it issues from hub 27 of cannula 22. This position is indicated by FIG. 5 of the drawing. It should be noted at this point that inner wall 36 of artery 34 will tend to close and seal once again at the original point of puncture 37.

The next step is to advance the remainder of assembly 20 into the lumen of artery 34 to the desired degree. As illustrated in FIG. 6, the blunt tip 26 on cannula 22 will facilitate this movement in the sense that it will allow the assembly to move through the vessel without danger of tearing or repuncturing the inner wall of vessel 34.

The final step as illustrated in FIG. 7 is to simply slide the plastic catheter 23 forward and remove blunt cannula 22 rearwardly at the same time to properly locate catheter 23 within the lumen of the artery 34 where it will assume the natural configuration of the artery and may be kept in that position for a considerable length of time. A plastic style! or obturator may be placed into the lumen of the needle to keep it from clotting between blood samples or if the catheters course is too tortuous, a syringe with anticoagulant may be attached thereto. A common type of Teflon or obturator may be sued used to occlude the Teflon catheter lumen since it will not clot and flow will be maintained well. It is further recommended that a sterile glove be used for intermittent sampling, especially with smaller needles, to avoid contamination of the obturator shafl.

Obturators of this typeare common as well as the use of a syringe with an anticoagulant which may-be attached to the hub of the catheter. Therefore, since these items are not part of the assembly itself they are not shown in the drawings for simplicity purposes. Assemblies of this type may remain in place for a considerable length of time without thromboembolic or other problems and with a minimum of patient discomfort.

The advantages of such an assembly as disclosed herein are readily apparent and include easier placement of an indwelling arterial catheterand higher success rates in any hands. Furthermore, they are more comfortable when placed in a difficult position because of the flexible features possible thereby avoiding patient immobilization. This allows one to leave such a catheter in place for comparatively long periods of time, for example, in an intensive care unit. It isrreadily apparent that from the ease of and simplicity of construction, the utilization of the assembly is significantly less traumatic. for the patient and the assembly is readilyadaptable for use in routine pulmonary physiological studies, cardiac output determinations and monitoring, indwelling arterial electrode use for monitoring partial pressure of oxygen, on-line arterial pressure monitoring, and any procedure requiring easy access to intermittent arterial blood samples over an extended period of time. As

discussed above, the technique of use is easily taught and the assembly is equally applicable to children as well as adults.

Thus, the above mentioned objects of the invention, among others, are achieved.

I claim:

1. An indwelling arterial cannula assembly comprising:

a rigid cannula having a blunted forward tip, a hub connected to its rear end and a passage therethrough;

a plastic catheter having a passage therethrough, a hub connected to its rear end and being coaxially removably mounted on said cannula said catheter being shorter in length than said cannula; and l a stylet having a pointed forward end, a hub attached to its rear end and being removably positioned within the passage of said cannula with its forward end portion extending beyond the blunted tip of said cannula thereby facilitating the positioning of a portion of said assembly into an artery and the subsequent removal of said cannula and stylet from said catheterto leave a portion of said plastic catheter in the desired position within said artery.

2. The invention in accordance with-claim 1 wherein the forward portion of said catheter tapers. inwardly toward the forward end thereof and terminates to the rear of the blunt tip of said cannula to facilitate entrance of said assembly into said artery.

3. The invention in accordance with claim 1 wherein said cannula is composed of a metallic material.

4. The invention in accordance with claim 1 wherein said pointed stylet is composed of a metallic material.

5. The invention in accordance with claim 1 wherein said catheter is composed of polytetrafluoroethylene.

6. The invention in accordance with claim 1 wherein said cannula is rounded at its blunted tip end.

7. The invention is accordance with claim 1 wherein said printed stylet extends 4 mm. beyond the blunted tip of said cannula.

8. A method of positioning into an artery a portion of a plastic catheter of an indwelling arterial cannula assembly including a plastic catheter coaxially removably mounted on a blunt tipped, rigid cannula having a pointed stylet removably located in the bore thereof and extending beyond the blunt tip of the cannula said catheter being shorter in length than said cannula comprising;

projecting said assembly into the artery by piercing both the outer and inner wallsof the artery with the point of said stylet and extending a portion of said assembly through the openings in the walls of said artery;

removing the stylet from said assembly;

retracting the remainder of said assembly until the forward tip thereof reenters the artery and fluid from said artery flows through said cannula; advancing the remainder of said assembly into the lumen of the artery to the desired position with the blunt tip of said cannula alleviating the danger of repuncture of the inner wall of the artery; and sliding the plastic catheter forward while removing the cannula therefrom thereby locating a portion of the catheter in the desired position in the artery. 9. The invention in accordance with claim 8 wherein after said cannula is removed from said catheter a plastic obturator is placed into the lumen of the catheter to alleviate the danger of clotting between the taking of samples of fluid from the artery.

10. The invention in accordance with claim 8 after said cannula is removed from said catheter a syringe containing an anticoagulant substance may be attached to the rear end of the catheter to alleviate the danger of clotting between the taking of samples of fluid from the artery.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2389355 *27 Jan 194320 Nov 1945Althea D KesslerSurgical needle
US3030953 *17 Oct 195724 Apr 1962Koehn Wilbur RApparatus for applying catheter
US3312220 *2 Apr 19634 Apr 1967Eisenberg Myron MichaelDisposable indwelling plastic cannula assembly
DE646559C *5 Jun 193517 Jun 1937Brynjulf IngebrigtsenPunktionsnadel
FR1092011A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3792703 *10 Jul 197219 Feb 1974Deseret PharmaCatheter placement unit
US3856009 *29 May 197324 Dec 1974Johnson & JohnsonCatheter placement unit
US4308875 *11 Mar 19815 Jan 1982Universal Medical Instrument CorporationAmniocentesis needle
US4327722 *20 Aug 19794 May 1982Groshong Leroy EMethods and apparatus for intravenous therapy and hyperalimentation
US4509534 *14 Jun 19829 Apr 1985Tassin Jr Myron JBlood withdrawal apparatus and method of using same
US4535773 *26 Mar 198220 Aug 1985Inbae YoonSafety puncturing instrument and method
US4581019 *22 Apr 19828 Apr 1986Curelaru JohanDevice for introducing a catheter-cannula into a blood vessel
US4643712 *18 Oct 198517 Feb 1987Blagoveschensky Gosudarstvenny Meditsinsky InstitutAortic cannula
US4699611 *19 Apr 198513 Oct 1987C. R. Bard, Inc.Biliary stent introducer
US4804365 *13 Feb 198714 Feb 1989C. R. BardVascular cannulae for transfemoral cardiopulmonary bypass and method of use
US4995866 *15 Dec 198926 Feb 1991Microvena CorporationCombined needle and dilator apparatus
US5160325 *22 Jan 19913 Nov 1992C. R. Bard, Inc.Catheter with novel lumens shapes
US5226426 *18 Dec 199013 Jul 1993Inbae YoonSafety penetrating instrument
US5232442 *26 Dec 19913 Aug 1993Brigham And Women's HospitalMethod and apparatus for inducing anesthesia
US5242410 *23 Apr 19927 Sep 1993University Of FloridaWireless high flow intravascular sheath introducer and method
US5304141 *31 Dec 199019 Apr 1994Brigham And Women's HospitalMethod and apparatus for inducing anesthesia
US5401247 *6 Jan 199428 Mar 1995Yoon; InbaeSafety penetrating instrument
US5458579 *25 Nov 199217 Oct 1995Technalytics, Inc.Mechanical trocar insertion apparatus
US5522832 *26 Jan 19944 Jun 1996Terumo Kabushiki KaishaBlood vessel piercing instrument
US5538509 *31 Jan 199423 Jul 1996Richard-Allan Medical Industries, Inc.Trocar assembly
US5549564 *7 Jun 199327 Aug 1996Yoon; InbaeSafety penetrating instrument
US5569288 *6 Jan 199429 Oct 1996Yoon; InbaeSafety penetrating instrument
US5584812 *16 Dec 199417 Dec 1996Stonefield Medical Products, Inc.Closed intravenous system
US5586991 *6 Jan 199424 Dec 1996Yoon; InbaeSafety penetrating instrument
US5855566 *1 Jun 19955 Jan 1999Urohealth, Inc. (California)Trocar assembly
US5941852 *1 Jun 199524 Aug 1999Imagyn Medical Technologies California, Inc.Cannula converter to convert the sealing diameter of a cannula
US6156010 *17 Jun 19985 Dec 2000Injectimed, Inc.Method and apparatus for introducing an intravenous catheter
US6558353 *25 Jan 20016 May 2003Walter A. ZohmannSpinal needle
US6607511 *9 Aug 200119 Aug 2003Mdc Investment Holdings, Inc.Medical device with safety flexible needle
US702574624 Dec 200211 Apr 2006Yale UniversityVascular access device
US7156836 *19 Apr 20012 Jan 2007Richard Keng Siang TeoCannula assembly
US7206642 *22 Apr 200217 Apr 2007Medtronic, Inc.Implantable lead with improved stylet lumen
US772256721 Dec 200525 May 2010Yale UniversityAccess device
US77405981 Mar 200722 Jun 2010C. R. Bard, Inc.Coaxial cannula provided with a sealing element
US776296129 Mar 200427 Jul 2010C. R. Bard, Inc.Pressure generating unit
US78287471 Mar 20079 Nov 2010C. R. Bard, Inc.Pressure generating unit
US785670711 Apr 200328 Dec 2010Medtronic, Inc.Method for performing a coplanar connection between a conductor and a contact on an implantable lead
US792269624 Jan 200812 Apr 2011Access Scientific, Inc.Access device
US795349611 Apr 200331 May 2011Medtronic, Inc.Implantable lead with isolated contact coupling
US800080222 Apr 200216 Aug 2011Medtronic, Inc.Implantable lead with coplanar contact coupling
US80027135 Mar 200323 Aug 2011C. R. Bard, Inc.Biopsy device and insertable biopsy needle module
US80121021 Mar 20076 Sep 2011C. R. Bard, Inc.Quick cycle biopsy system
US80167721 Mar 200713 Sep 2011C. R. Bard, Inc.Biopsy device for removing tissue specimens using a vacuum
US805261430 Dec 20098 Nov 2011C. R. Bard, Inc.Biopsy device having a vacuum pump
US80526158 Jul 20058 Nov 2011Bard Peripheral Vascular, Inc.Length detection system for biopsy device
US807552918 Dec 200713 Dec 2011Medikit Co., Ltd.Indwelling needle assembly
US8083720 *13 May 200827 Dec 2011Solar Matthew SDevice and method for delivering therapeutic agents to an area of the body
US8105286 *18 Apr 200831 Jan 2012Access Scientific, Inc.Access device
US810988517 Mar 20037 Feb 2012C. R. Bard, Inc.Biopsy device for removing tissue specimens using a vacuum
US81577448 Jul 200517 Apr 2012Bard Peripheral Vascular, Inc.Tissue sample flushing system for biopsy device
US81628515 Oct 201024 Apr 2012C. R. Bard, Inc.Biopsy needle system having a pressure generating unit
US81727731 Mar 20078 May 2012C. R. Bard, Inc.Biopsy device and biopsy needle module that can be inserted into the biopsy device
US819240218 Apr 20085 Jun 2012Access Scientific, Inc.Access device
US820225113 Mar 200919 Jun 2012Access Scientific, Inc.Access device
US825191717 Aug 200728 Aug 2012C. R. Bard, Inc.Self-contained handheld biopsy needle
US826258510 Aug 200611 Sep 2012C. R. Bard, Inc.Single-insertion, multiple sampling biopsy device with linear drive
US826258623 Oct 200711 Sep 2012C. R. Bard, Inc.Large sample low aspect ratio biopsy needle
US826786810 Aug 200618 Sep 2012C. R. Bard, Inc.Single-insertion, multiple sample biopsy device with integrated markers
US828257410 Aug 20069 Oct 2012C. R. Bard, Inc.Single-insertion, multiple sampling biopsy device usable with various transport systems and integrated markers
US83066315 Aug 20116 Nov 2012Medtronic, Inc.Implantable lead with coplanar contact coupling
US83337343 Jul 200318 Dec 2012Walter A. ZohmannFenestrated peripheral nerve block needle and method for using the same
US83666368 Jul 20055 Feb 2013Bard Peripheral Vascular, Inc.Firing system for biopsy device
US837700530 Nov 201019 Feb 2013Custom Medical ApplicationsNeural injection system and related methods
US837700611 Apr 201119 Feb 2013Access Scientific, Inc.Access device
US8382793 *14 Jan 200326 Feb 2013Radi Medical Systems AbIntroducer sheath
US838605528 Apr 201126 Feb 2013Medtronic, Inc.Implantable lead with isolated contact coupling
US843082429 Oct 200930 Apr 2013Bard Peripheral Vascular, Inc.Biopsy driver assembly having a control circuit for conserving battery power
US844950330 Nov 201028 May 2013Custom Medical ApplicationsNeural injection system and related methods
US845453211 Nov 20104 Jun 2013Devicor Medical Products, Inc.Clutch and valving system for tetherless biopsy device
US84859875 Oct 200716 Jul 2013Bard Peripheral Vascular, Inc.Tissue handling system with reduced operator exposure
US84859891 Sep 200916 Jul 2013Bard Peripheral Vascular, Inc.Biopsy apparatus having a tissue sample retrieval mechanism
US85041687 Dec 20106 Aug 2013Medtronic, Inc.Implantable lead with coplanar contact coupling
US859720517 Jul 20123 Dec 2013C. R. Bard, Inc.Biopsy device
US859720612 Oct 20093 Dec 2013Bard Peripheral Vascular, Inc.Biopsy probe assembly having a mechanism to prevent misalignment of components prior to installation
US8641677 *21 Jan 20104 Feb 2014James T. RawlsLow-profile intravenous catheter device
US865779027 Oct 201125 Feb 2014Access Scientific, Inc.Access device with blunting device
US867288825 May 201018 Mar 2014Yale UniversityAccess device
US869079316 Mar 20098 Apr 2014C. R. Bard, Inc.Biopsy device having rotational cutting
US870262129 Apr 201122 Apr 2014C.R. Bard, Inc.Quick cycle biopsy system
US870262210 Aug 201122 Apr 2014C.R. Bard, Inc.Quick cycle biopsy system
US870892815 Apr 200929 Apr 2014Bard Peripheral Vascular, Inc.Biopsy apparatus having integrated fluid management
US870892912 Mar 201329 Apr 2014Bard Peripheral Vascular, Inc.Biopsy apparatus having integrated fluid management
US870893013 Mar 201329 Apr 2014Bard Peripheral Vascular, Inc.Biopsy apparatus having integrated fluid management
US872156328 Aug 201213 May 2014C. R. Bard, Inc.Single-insertion, multiple sample biopsy device with integrated markers
US872800328 Aug 201220 May 2014C.R. Bard Inc.Single insertion, multiple sample biopsy device with integrated markers
US872800412 Apr 201220 May 2014C.R. Bard, Inc.Biopsy needle system having a pressure generating unit
US877120022 Aug 20128 Jul 2014C.R. Bard, Inc.Single insertion, multiple sampling biopsy device with linear drive
US20110178464 *21 Jan 201021 Jul 2011Rawls James TLow-profile intravenous catheter device
CN100525850C24 Dec 200212 Aug 2009耶鲁大学Vascular access device
EP0433717A1 *28 Nov 199026 Jun 1991B. Braun Melsungen AGInstrument set for puncture
EP0608854A2 *26 Jan 19943 Aug 1994Terumo Kabushiki KaishaBlood vessel piercing instrument
EP1935447A1 *14 Dec 200725 Jun 2008Medikit Co., Ltd.Indwelling needle assembly
EP2740422A15 Dec 201211 Jun 2014Custom Medical ApplicationsSafety neural injection system and related methods
WO1982003003A1 *2 Nov 198116 Sep 1982Young Ruperto SAn amniocentesis needle
WO1983000429A1 *2 Aug 198217 Feb 1983Electro Catheter CorpCatheter-needle assembly and method for drainage of fluid collections
WO1993014710A1 *29 Jan 19935 Aug 1993Al Rawi Muthafar MuflihFine gauge needles and cannulae
WO2003057272A2 *24 Dec 200217 Jul 2003Michael TalVascular access device
Classifications
U.S. Classification604/164.11
International ClassificationA61M25/06
Cooperative ClassificationA61M25/0606
European ClassificationA61M25/06C