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Publication numberUS3179914 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication date20 Apr 1965
Filing date6 Nov 1962
Priority date6 Nov 1962
Publication numberUS 3179914 A, US 3179914A, US-A-3179914, US3179914 A, US3179914A
InventorsUberbacher Edward C
Original AssigneeIbm
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Coaxial line connector
US 3179914 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 20, 1965 E. c. UBERBACHER COAXIAL LINE CONNECTOR 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Nov. 6, 1962 I NVENTOR EDWARD C. UBERBACHER ATTORNEY April 20, 1965 E. c. UBERBACHER GOAXIAL LINE CONNECTOR 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Nov. 6, 1962 United States Patent M 3,179,914 COAXIAL LINE CONNECTOR Edward C. Uberbacher, Poughkeepsie, N.Y., assignor to International Business Machines Corporation, New York, N.Y., a corporation of New York Filed Nov. 6, 1962, Ser. No. 235,695 13 Claims. (Cl. 339-49) This invention relates in general to electrical connectors and more specifically to forms of connectors. wherein a coaxial line or shielded Wire conductor is coupled to a similar line or other conductor by means of wiping contacts. attached at mating ends of a separable connection.

A need is fulfilled herein by providing apparatus utilizing pulses of electrical and magnetic waves of high frequency with simple pluggable means of connection to be joined with the same facility as connections for lower frequency apparatus. However, the nature of the energy used by high frequency apparatus requires extra quality transmission lines such as coaxial or shielded wire conductors and pluggable connections therefore present special problems for maintaining electrical characteristics of the lines when joined.

Heretofore, such coaxial or shielded conductors were often terminated by connections which required soldering the braid or outer conductor and the inner conductor elements to terminal connectors such as pins or tubes. Such terminals were then mated to similarly constructed cable ends, receptacles or sockets in order to establish the electrical connection. The soldering of these small terminal parts involved precision handling with tedious and time consuming operations for each cable termination. The pin and socket connections of the prior art are not economical to manufacture, electroplate and assemble onto cable ends and receptacle receivers.

An object of the invention, therefore, is to provide a coaxial cable or shielded wire connection that is economical to manufacture, easy to assemble, and that provides simple but effective wiping contact connections for all cable elements in either a cable to cable relationship or when a cable is joined to a panel socket.

Another object of the invention is to provide a coaxial cable or shielded wire connection in which a number of stamped and formed sheet metal parts are used for economical construction. Contact blades are formed to fit directly onto cable elements.

Another object of .the invention is the provision of a connector design combining the quality features of coaxial cable and leaf type contacts to form a versatile low cost connector.

Another object of the invention is the provision of a leaf type contact for coaxial cable connectors wherein lead wires are dispensed with and multiple crimping operations are eliminated.

A further object of the invention is to provide coaxial cable termination of reduced size and of square crosssection. The regular equal sided shape of the cable con- 3,l7fi,ld Patented Apr. 20, 1965 honeycomb panel receivers are arranged to align and protect assemblies of multiple connections. Retaining key projections of simple fiat construction may be fitted into panel blocks of cable end housings to hold them together. Latching screw assemblies of blocks is also afforded.

One of the features of the invention is the provision of a universal type of connector for joining coaxial cable or shielded wire connections together or to a panel in which the inner and outer conductors are joined to leaf spring contacts in the panel connector and which said contacts are receptive to wiping engagement with similar contacts in a pluggable coaxial cable end.

The foregoing, and other objects, features and advantages of the invention will be apparent from the following more particular description of the preferred embodiments of the invention, as illustrated in the accompanying drawings.

In the drawings:

FIG. 1 is a section elevation view of a coaxial cable end.

FIG. 2 is an end view of the cable end taken in the position of line 2 2 in FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is a sectional elevation view taken along line 33 in FIG. 1.

FIG. 4 is a sectional view taken along line 44 in FIG. 1.

FIG. 5 is a detail view of an outer shield contact.

FIG. 6 is a detail view of an inner signal conductor contact.

FIG. 7 is a perspective view of the cable end shown in FIG. 1 after it has been crimped.

FIG. 8 is a sectional elevation view showing the assembly of a plurality of connected cable ends.

FIG. 9 is a perspective view showing a plurality of cable ends keyed into a frame or panel.

FIG. 10 is a front elevation view of the panel and keys shown in FIG. 9.

FIG. 11 is a perspective view of a honeycomb assembly of a pair of panels held together for reception of mated pairs of cable ends.

Referring to FIGS. 1-7 of the drawing, a connector in accordance with the principles of my invention is shown to comprise a cable 20 and a cable termination 21. Cable 20, FIG. 1, is of the coaxial shielded type including an inner signal conductor 22, insulation tube 23, a shield conductor or braided metal grounding sheath 24, and an outer insulation coating or cover 25.

At the right in FIG. 1 it is seen that the end of inner conductor 22 is exposed and on it is fitted a split sleeve portion 27 of a spring leaf contact 28 which extends beyond the end face 29 of a terminal block or holder 30. Block 30 is formed of a strong deformable insulation plastic, ceramic or other non-conductive material and while rather thick and stiff at the right end (FIG. 1) where the contacts are held, it is much thinner and deformable at the left end 31 where the cable end is crimped therein as shown in FIG. 7.

The inside of block 30 is formed with a cylindrical o'pening 32 to receive sleeve 27 and an enlarged opening 33 to receive the outer parts of the cable end. Inside opening 33 is seen to be fitted a metal tube 34 over the insulation cover 23. This tube 34 when crimped on cover 23 acts to hold it in place and also form a firm backing for the metal shielding 24 which is to be crimped against a contact as explained hereinafter.

The left opening in block 30, FIG. 1, is seen to be enlarged to receive the end of the braided tube shielding 24 over the tube 34 and also an outer metal sleeve 35 which is not initially truly circular in cross-section, but extended outward in one corner as shown in FIG. 4. This outward bulge or extension 36 of sleeve 35 provides space for the insertion of an elongated flat inner end portion 37 of a leaf type contact 38 which has an S shaped bend 39 outside face 29 of block 3% so that it has outer conformity with the shape of contact 28. Bend 39 lies in a recess 19 (FIG. 2) formed in the face 29 of block 30 so that a fulcrum is afforded for the action of blade 38. FIGS. and 6 illustrate shapes of the two contacts 28 and 38 which make them receptive to wiping connection with similarly shaped contacts in another cable end.

Returning to consideration of contact and how it is fitted inside block 30, in FIG. 1 it is seen that its left end is slipped between shield 24 and sleeve 35 and its right end passes through a corner opening or hole 41, FIG. 3, beyond which the S bend 39 carries the contact end along recess 19 and out of the block and parallel with the other contact 28. A twist 42 of portion 37 inside the hole 41 stitfens and seats the contact against the hole wall in several directions. A widened shoulder area 40 fits into a slot 43 and provides a firm fulcrum for the flexing and spring action of the contact 38. The recessed area 19 in the face 29 of block 30 provides a protective shelter area for the S bend portion 39 of the contact 38.

Although crimping has been mentioned with respect to several locations, it is well to note that the effecting of it on all terminal parts is a one shot proposition. In other words, after the cable and contact parts have been assembled inside block 30 as described hereinbefore, a single stroke of pressure applied at several locations, serves to attach firmly the inner parts of contacts 28 and 38 to the cable conductors. A pair of block depressions or holes 44, FIG. 3, provide access to shallow portions surrounding contact sleeve 27 so that it may be deformed or crimped onto wire 22 at the same time that block end 31, is deformed or crimped as shown in FIG. 7 to pinch contact end 37 between braid wire shield 24 and tube 35 to form fast mechanical and electrical connections between the cable conductors and the flexible contacts. It is the deforming of sleeves 27, 34 and 35 which performs the fast, secure attachment of the contacts 28 and 38, while the block 30 is deformed for further securance of the cable end.

Block 36 is formed with a protective shelf or extension 45 which projects beyond the ends of the contacts 28 and 38 to not only protect them from damage but to act also as a limiting stop for their upward flexure and also aid in inserting the terminal as a whole in a panel opening. A central web 46 serves to keep the contact ends isolated and prevent forced touching between contact ends.

A groove 47 is formed in block 30 so that when the block is inserted in any receiver, a spring latch or dimpled formation on such receiver may spring into groove 47 and hold the block 30 positioned in the receiver and fully inserted therein. As pointed out hereinafter, an alternative to the groove locater 47 is provided in the form of a combined groove and projecting key or foot which is to be formed or molded in the same position as groove 47 but project to be keyed into other notches in frames or on adjacent blocks such as block 30.

FIGS. 1-7 deal mainly with a single cable end or termination. The other views, FIGS. 8-1l show various ways in which one or more pairs of such cable connectors may be held together as cable to cable, or machine panel to cable combinations, or any other connector combinations.

In FIG. 8, a pair of panel frames 48 and 49 are seen to be spaced and brought together by pairs of screw assembled blocks 50 and 51. A series of marginal screws 52 are threaded through frame nuts and block openings to provide an interior opening which is proportional to be of plastic or thin metal.

7 i one or more multiples of the square spacing required by block 3%, FIG. 7. With several pairs of blocks 30 so confined and keyed within frames 48 and 49, the contacts 38 therein are brought into wiping contact as shown and held together.

It was noted hereinbefore with reference to FIGS. 1 and 7 that the holder 30 could be formed with a peripheral notch 47 but that other retaining or keying arrangements could be made with respect to inserted contact assemblies. FIGS. 9 and 10 show how provision of key notches 54 anr projecting key feet perform such a retaining operation with respect to a whole series of confined contact assemblies 39 exposed as a panel beyond a frame 53 which may very well be a machine frame. Frame 53 is formed With a large opening receiving a whole series of contact assemblies and has, inside such an opening, an extending rib 57 provided on all inner edges except the bottom edge which is formed with a groove 56. The rib 57 extends into grooves such as groove 54 formed in the contact holder 30. This serves to position axially all the peripheral sets of assemblies within the frame opening. These outer contact frames in turn are keyed to other intermediate holders 30 by means of keying projections 55 one of which extends from each of the holders 3b. This keying member or outwardly extending foot 55 extends into the grooves 54 of three adjacent holders 30 so that in effect four holders are keyed together axially by each one of the keying members 55. Since the bottom layer of holders 30 FIG. 9 have no corresponding grooves 54, a substitute therefore is provided in the form of the groove 56 formed in the frame member 53. Thus, the contact holders are not only keyed in position by the rib 57 and the cooperation between the keying members 55 with respect to adjacent block grooves, but there is also the keying into the notch 56 to hold all blocks near the bottom of the panel blocked therein.

As a further measure of spacing and assembly control, the corners of the array of holders 30 in panel 53 are specially formed to be proportioned with square blocks 59 each integral with frame 53 or each of which may or may not contain a keying member and each of which may be provided with a positioning rod 60 or screw hole therein ready to receive rods or screws for coupling of another panel to panel 53 and also to provide means for securing other confining members to the corners of the array of contacts. Along the bottom of panel 53 there is shown a portion 5% of another panel frame with its groove 66 receptive to keying feet of mating blocks 36 on the second panel frame.

FIG. 10 is a rear View of the assembly shown in FIG. 9 and serves to illustrate how the feet or keying members 55 cooperate in an overlapping position with respect to the three adjacent contact blocks of each block and also how the feet of the bottom keys extend into the groove 56.

Although it is possible as shown in FIG. 9 to have an array of assembly blocks 39 presented in an exposed position with outside support secondary to the support afforded by the projections 45 of blocks '30 which provide intermediate shelving for an array of blocks, it is also desirable at times to provide individual support for each pair of mated blocks as shown in FIG. 11. There the honeycomb form of construction comprises a pair of panels each formed by soldering together, or attaching by adhesives or welding a whole series of parallel boxes 62 which are of hollow square formation and which may Although it is possible for one such thickness of boxes 62 to stand alone, the usual arrangement is for a pair of such receivers 62 to be joined by one or more screw connections involving blocks 63 and fastened in one or more positions in the respective arrays of blocks 62, said connector blocks being joined by a screw 64 threaded through block 65 and into block 63. When such a parallel honeycomb arrangement is joined it is receptive to a whole array of cable terminal blocks 30. As shown, the blocks 30 are inserted from opposite sides of the square openings and inside this joined formation the pairs of contacts 28 and 33 are brought into wiping contact and held therein by such contact as well as by a dimpled formation 70 in each receiver 62 cooperating with a slot or notch 47 shown in FIG. 7.

While the invention has been particularly shown and described with reference to preferred embodiments thereof, it will be understood by those skilled in the art that the foregoing and other changes in form and details may be made therein without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention.

What is claimed is:

1. In a coaxial cable connector,

a cable comprising a signal conductor and a tubular shield therefor,

a wiping contact for said signal conductor comprising an extending contact leaf joined to a cylindrical portion which is crimped onto the end of said signal conductor,

a housing block enclosing said cable end and confining said cylindrical portion of said contact leaf,

said housing block enclosing a tubular member for the end of said cable,

said tubular member fitting within said shield, another cylindrical member also within said block and associated with the end of said cable in position encircling the end of said shield,

a second contact comprising an elongated projection which is inserted between said shield and said cylindrical member,

said second contact being formed with an extending wiping leaf, and

said second leaf having an intermediate portion fitted within an opening in said block to provide a fulcrum for flexing action,

an extension on said housing block to protect said extending contact leaves and provide a stop for the flexing action thereof,

a pair of depressions in said housing block providing access for crimping action against said tubular and cylindrical members on the first mentioned contact,

said housing block being formed with an end of thin cross section coinciding with the positions of said tibular and cylindrical members under and over said s ield,

whereby crimping of said thin block end is communicated through the block. to deform said members and confine the second contact end in the space between the shield and the cylindrical member.

2. In a coaxial cable connector,

a cable Comprising a signal conductor and a tubular shield therefor,

a wiping contact for said signal conductor comprising an extending contact leaf joined to a cylindrical portion which is crimped onto the end of said signal conductor,

a housing block enclosing said cable end and confining said cylindrical portion of said contact leaf, said housing block enclosing a tubular member for the end of said cable,

said tubular member fitting Within said shield,

another cylindrical member also within said block and associated with the end of said cable in a position encircling the end of said shield,

a second contact comprising an elongated projection which is inserted between said shield and said cylindrical member,

said second contact being formed with an extending wiping leaf, and

said second leaf having an intermediate portion fitted within a confining opening in said block to provide a fulcrum for flexing action,

said block being formed with an intermediate area of reduced cross section and an end of thin cross section coinciding with the positions therein of said cylindrical contact portion and said cylindrical member over said shield,

whereby crimping of said reduced and thin sections is communicated through the block to deform said portion and members and confine the contacts simultaneously.

.3. In a coaxial cable connector,

a cable comprising a signal conductor and a tubular shield therefor,

a Wiping contact for said signal conductor comprising an extending contact leaf joined to a cylindrical portion which is to be crimped onto the end of said signal conductor,

a housing block enclosing said cable end and confining said cylindrical portion of said contact leaf,

a second contact comprising an elongated projection which is attached to said shield and formed with an extending wiping leaf,

said second leaf having an intermediate portion confined in said block to provide a fulcrum for flexing action,

a series of depressions formed in said block over said contact cylindrical portion to give access for crimping action against said cylindrical portion of the first mentioned contact to hold it firmly on said signal conductor.

4. A connector of the kind set forth in claim 3 wherein said extending contact leaves extend similarly and with spacing compatible with mating of a similar contact pair in a similar connector.

5. A connector of the kind set forth in claim 4 wherein the block end from which said leaves extend is shaped square with the leaves extending centrally therefrom to mate in any position with a similar connector.

6. A coaxial cable connector comprising:

a cable end having an inner conductor, an inner layer of insulation thereon, a coaxial shield and an outer layer of insulation,

a block housing enclosing said cable end in a thin walled section at one end, and having a thick walled section at the other end,

said thin section also enclosing a pair of thin walled cylinders, one cylinder between the shield and the housing and a second cylinder between the shield and said inner insulation layer, and

a pair of leaf contacts, one attached to said inner conductor and the other inserted between said one cylinder and said shield, said contacts having flexible portions extending out of said housing for wiping connection with similar pairs of contacts, said thin walled section being crimped to attach said contacts internally.

7. A connector of the kind set forth in claim 6 wherein said thick walled housing section is recessed and made thin walled locally coincident with the assembly of a contact on said inner conductor, whereby the two may be crimped together by pressure through said local thin wall.

8. A connector of the kind set forth in claim 6 wherein said inserted contact is threaded through a hole in said housing, said hole having keying slots to receive a shouldered section of said contact to hold it in said housing.

9. A connector of the kind set forth in claim 6 wherein said housing is formed square in cross section at the thick walled end with the projecting contacts, and a locating notch indenting said thick walled end.

10. A connector of the kind set forth in claim 9 wherein said locating notch contains an extending foot which I projects into similar notches on adjacent housings so that o to fit into the locating notches of said connectors, and a slot to receive said keying feet, whereby said connectors are locked into said frame.

12. A connector of the kind set forth in claim 11 wherein said frame is provided with attaching means for receiving and holding a similar frame said that mated pairs of contacts of pairs of cable ends are held together.

13. A connector of the kind set forth in claim 9 with a honeycomb frame formed with an array of square openings shaped to receive and hold said housing ends, and

attaching means in said frame for receiving and holding a similar frame with cable end contacts mated.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS Engqvist 339-183 X Dupre 339l77 X Wilson 339-49 X Ritter 339223 X Lazar 339223 X Forney 339223 X Jackson et a1. 339-64 X JOSEPH D. SEERS, Primary Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2499474 *9 May 19457 Mar 1950Ericsson Telefon Ab L MElectrical connector
US2536003 *8 Jul 194626 Dec 1950Burndy Engineering Co IncCoaxial cable connection
US2548457 *10 Jan 194710 Apr 1951Gen Radio CoCoaxial connector for high-frequency transmission lines
US2774810 *21 Aug 195118 Dec 1956Aircraft Marine Prod IncElectrical connector
US2901528 *24 Dec 195725 Aug 1959Burndy CorpWire connector
US2904619 *23 Jul 195415 Sep 1959Amp IncShielded wire connectors
US2933713 *30 Apr 195719 Apr 1960Anton JacksonFramed multiple screw lock connector units
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3315218 *22 Jan 196518 Apr 1967Gen ElectricElectrical connector for coaxial cable
US3483339 *28 Feb 19679 Dec 1969Amp IncCoaxial and shielded plugboard apparatus
US4636015 *30 Aug 198513 Jan 1987Motorola, Inc.RF connector
US4636016 *30 Aug 198513 Jan 1987Motorola, Inc.Accessory connector
US5554038 *16 Nov 199410 Sep 1996Framatome Connectors InternationalConnector for shielded cables
US5676570 *15 Mar 199614 Oct 1997Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company"F" port interface connector
US5868584 *18 Feb 19979 Feb 1999Amerace Ltd.Electrical connector for shielded cable
US6814615 *12 Feb 20049 Nov 2004Tyco Electronics CorporationCoaxial cable connector
EP0512438A2 *30 Apr 199211 Nov 1992Molex IncorporatedElectrical connector assemblies
EP0654859A1 *31 Oct 199424 May 1995Framatome Connectors InternationalConnector for shielded cables
EP2339697A1 *20 Dec 201029 Jun 2011RadiallContact system
Classifications
U.S. Classification439/295, 439/701, 439/585
International ClassificationH01R13/514, H01R13/28, H01R13/02, H01R9/05
Cooperative ClassificationH01R13/514, H01R9/05, H01R13/28
European ClassificationH01R13/514