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Publication numberUS3108604 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication date29 Oct 1963
Filing date6 Jan 1961
Priority date6 Jan 1961
Publication numberUS 3108604 A, US 3108604A, US-A-3108604, US3108604 A, US3108604A
InventorsKrull Ruth M
Original AssigneeKrull Ruth M
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Corrugated paper hair curler
US 3108604 A
Images(1)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 29, 1963 R. M. KRULL CORRUGATED PAPER HAIR CURLER Filed Jan. 6, 1961 INVENTOR. P112): 777. Email BY (9W, YM

United States Patent 3,108,604 CGRRUGATED PAPER HAIR CURLER Ruth M. Kruil, Red Arrow Ledge, Pi). Box 156, Tomahawk, Wis. Filed Earn. 6, 1961, Ser. No. 81,922 6 tliaims. (Cl. l3239) This invention relates to new and improved hair curlers for use in setting and waving hair.

One object of the present invention is to provide new and improved hair curler rollers which are disposable, sanitary, and extremely light in weight.

A further object is to provide a new and improved hair curler roller which is in the form of a hollow tube made of paper. Thus, the hair curlers of the present inven tion are so inexpensive that they may be discarded after a single using.

Another object is to provide a new and improved hair curler which may be slept upon comfortably, when the hair has been put up on the rollers for the night.

A further object is to provide a new and improved hair curler in the form of a hollow tubular roller made of two paper plies, at least one of which is formed with longitudinal corrugations forming channels adapted to receive bobby pins or the like, to prevent the hair from unrolling from the roller.

Another object is to provide a new and improved hair curler roller which is made of paper and which has its outer surface formed of absorbent material, to promote the drying of the hair.

A further object is to provide a new and improved paper hair curler having its outer portion impregnated with a hair treating compound, such as a waving compound, a dandruff treatment, a perfume, or the like.

Still another object of the present invention is to provide new and improved hair curlers which are easy and convenient to use, yet extremely low in cost.

Further objects and advantages of the present inven-.

tion will appear from the following description, taken with the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a paper hair curler roller, having corrugations on the inside, to be described as an illustrative embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 2 is a perspective View of a modified paper hair curler roller, having corrugations on the outside.

FIG. 3 is a perspective view of another modified hair curler roller, similar to the one shown in FIG. 1, but having a foraminous or perforated outer ply.

FIG. 4 is a perspective View of another embodiment, similar to that of FIG. 1, but having an outer ply made of absorbent material which may be impregnated with various hair treating compounds.

FIG. 5 is a perspective view of still another hair curler roller, similar to the one of FIG. 1, but notched to receive and retain an elastic band, made of rubber or the like, for holding the hair on the roller.

It will be seen that FIG. 1 illustrates a hair curler ill in the form of a hollow, tubular, generally cylindrical roller made of paper or cardboard. In curling the hair, the roller is used by rolling a lock of the hair onto the outside of the curler. The roller may then be secured in place in any suitable manner. For example, a bobby pin 12 may he slipped over the wall of the roller, and over the hair wound on the roller at one or both ends of the roller, generally in the manner illustrated in FIG. 1. If necessary, several bobby pins may be employed to secure the roller in place.

Inasmuch as the hair curler roller 14} is made of paper, it is relatively soft and compliant, and thus is comfortable to wear, even when slept upon after putting up the hair for the night. Moreover, the roller is light in weight so that the necessary number of rollers, employed to put Patented Get. 29, 1%63 up the hair, may be carried on the head without any appreciable discomfort or fatigue. Since the roller is made of paper, it is very low in cost and thus may be discarded after a single use. Thus, the roller achieves the ultimate in cleanliness and sanitation.

While the roller it? may be made of plain paper or cardboard, it is preferred that the roller be made with an inner ply 14. and an outer ply 16. The plies may be suitably glued or otherwise bonded together. Preferably, one of the plies is formed with longitudinal corrugations 18. In the embodiment shown in FIG. 1, the corrugations 18 are formed in the inner play 14. The outer ply 16 is of plain cylindrical form, i.e. smooth and round. The corrugations 13 are highly advantageous because they provide channels for receiving and retaining the hobby pin 12. The channels prevent the bobby pins from slipping along the circumference of the roller. Thus, the roller is retained securely in place when it is covered with coils of hair. Each corrugation 18 also provides a channel or passage 22 between the corrugation and the outer ply 16. If desired, the bobby pin 12 may be slipped into the channels or passages 22. The corrugations 18 also reinforce the roller it so as to give the roller enhanced resistance to bending and other deformation.

The outer ply 16 is shown with a longitudinal overlapping seam 24, but it may be formed as a spirally wound tube, or in any other suitable manner.

FIG. 2 illustrates a modified roller 30 having inner and outer plies 34 and 35. In this case, the outer ply 36 is formed with longitudinal corrugations 38, While the inner ply 34 is in the form of a plain substantially cylindricfl tube, i.e. smooth and round. As shown, the corrugations 38 form channels 4% on the outside of the roller 3%. These channels tend to prevent the hair from slipping off the roller. Moreover, each corrugation provides a channel or passage between the corrugation and the inner ply 34. A bobby pin may be slipped into each of the passages 42., as desired, so as to prevent the bobby pin from slipping around the circumference of the roller 30.

FIG. 3 illustrates a modified roller 44 which is similar to the roller 10 of FIG. 1, except that it has a foraminous outer ply 46. Thus, a large number of perforations 47 are formed in the outer ply or wall 45. These perforations 47 provide ventilation which promotes the drying of the hair which is rolled upon the roller. Moreover, the perforations reduce the v eight of the roller 4-4. The foraminous outer ply 46 may be made of perforated paper, or of a woven or netted fabric, or the like. Plastic mesh materials may also be employed in the outer ply 46.

in the hair curling rollers of the present invention, it is preferred to bond the inner and outer plies with a waterproof or water-resistant adhesive so that the rollers will not be damaged when wet hair is put up on the rollers. Moreover, the roller, particularly the outer ply, may be made resistant to the penetration of liquids such as water, waving solutions and hair spray. Thus, the outer ply may be waxed, or may be coated or impregnated with a suitable material to resist the penetration of liquids. in some cases, the outer ply may be made of plastic sheet material.

Alternatively, the outer ply, or at least the outer portion of the outer ply, may be made of absorbent material. Thus, FIG. 4 illustrates another modified hair curling roller 50 having an outer ply 56 made of blotting paper or some other absorbent material, such as fabric or the like. The absorbent material soaks up moisture from the hair and thus promotes drying of the hair. Otherwise, the roller 59 may be similar to the roller 10 of FIG. 1. The corrugations 18 of the inner ply 14 provide ventilation which accelerates the drying of the absorbent outer ply 56. If desired, the absorbent outer ply 56 may be impregnated with a hair treating compound, such as a waving compound, a perfume, a dandruff treatment or the like. The hair treating compounds may be activated and transferred to the hair by moisture, which may be supplied directly from the hair by putting up the hair wet upon the roller. Alternatively, the hair and the roller may be moistened after the hair has been rolled onto the roller. By impregnating the roller with a suitable permanent waving compound, the roller may be employed to give a permanent wave.

PEG. illustrates a modified roller 60 which is the same as the roller shown in FIG. 1, except that the roller 69 is formed with diametrically opposite notches 62 at each end for receiving and retaining an elastic band 64 made of rubber or the like. The elastic band 64 may be employed to secure the roller in place after hair has been rolled upon the roller.

If desired, the rollers of the present invention may be tinted or colored to match various shades of hair coloring. In this way, the rollers will be less noticeable when the hair is put up on the rollers. Alternatively, the rollers may be brightly colored to achieve various decorative effects.

Because the rollers may be made of paper, they can be made at extremely low cost, so that it is economically feasible to discard the rollers after a single use. Thus, if used only once, the rollers are entirely sanitary. They eliminate any possibility of spreading infection from one person to another. It will be evident that the rollers will find a mass market among women generally, for home use. In addition, the rollers are of great value to institutional users, such as beauty parlors, hospitals, homes for the aged, mental hospitals, and other public institutions. Because the rollers are made entirely of paper, without any metal, the rollers are safe to use in mental hospitals, prisons, and other places where security is a consideration.

The rollers of the present invenn'on may be made in various sizes. Thus, the length and diameter of the rollers may be varied as desired. Small-sized rollers may be made for use by children and to make tight curls. Larger rollers may be used by adults and to produce looser curls.

Girls and women of all ages will find that the rollers of the present invention are unmatched for comfort, convenience, sanitation, efiectiveness and economy.

Various other modifications, alternative constructions and equivalents may be employed without departing from 41- the true spirit and scope of the invention, as exemplified in the foregoing description and defined in the following claims.

I claim:

1. A hair curler roller comprising an inner ply and an outer ply of pliable paper with the plies being bonded one to the other, one of said plies being in the form of a hollow tubular member which is smooth and round, the other ply being in the form of a corrugated member with the corrugations being circumferentially spaced apart and extending axially substantially throughout its length, said piles being arranged one within the other and dimensioned so that the crests of the corrugated ply which extend in the direction of the plain tubular ply are in contacting relation with the adjacent surface of the plain tubular ply and define circumfercntially spaced apart longitudinally extending channels therebetween.

2. A hair curler roller as claimed in claim 1 in which the corrugated ply constitutes the inner ply.

3. A hair curler roller as claimed in claim 1 in which the corrugated ply constitutes the outer ply.

4. A hair curler roller as claimed in claim 1 in which the outer surface of the outer ply is of absorbent material.

5. A hair curler roller as claimed in claim 1 in which the outer ply is foraminous.

6. A hair curler roller as claimed in claim 1 in which the outer ply is fluid impervious.

References tilted in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 429,984 Wegefarth June 10, 1890 1,042,886 Buickerood Oct. 29, 1912 1,345,040 Vandamark June 29, 1920 2,014,283 Jackson Sept. 10, 1935 2,139,436 Beck Dec. 6, 1938 2,321,709 Solomon June 15, 1943 2,349,285 Korf et a1. May 23, 1944 2,369,752 Ostrander Feb. 20, 1945 2,600,727 Berman et al. June 17, 1952 2,630,809 Lewis et a1 Mar. 10, 1953 2,925,021 Basta Feb. 16, 1960 2,972,994 Ferens Feb. 28, 1961 FOREIGN PATENTS 224,717 Australia Apr. 3, 1958

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US429984 *2 Jan 189010 Jun 1890 wegefarth
US1042886 *30 Mar 191229 Oct 1912John W BuickeroodMarcel waver.
US1345040 *6 Jul 191629 Jun 1920Vandamark Olive ECurler
US2014283 *5 Jul 193510 Sep 1935Anton JacksonHair curler
US2139436 *5 Aug 19376 Dec 1938Beck MichelMethod and means for waving hair
US2321709 *29 Oct 194215 Jun 1943Solomon Nathan LFeatherweight hair curler
US2349285 *23 Jun 193223 May 1944Sales Affiliates IncMethod of permanent waving and a permanent waving heater
US2369752 *7 Dec 194320 Feb 1945Dezell OstranderHair curler
US2600727 *15 Aug 194917 Jun 1952Jean S BermanFountain curling rod
US2630809 *14 Jun 195110 Mar 1953Lewis Charles RDevice for use in curling hair
US2925021 *22 Aug 195816 Feb 1960Basta Lawrence EugeneMethod of making hair curling tube
US2972994 *22 Apr 195728 Feb 1961Marcella FerensHair curlers
AU224717B * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3791391 *20 Jun 197212 Feb 1974Prince ZHair curler apparatus
US3910290 *31 Oct 19737 Oct 1975Litman Marvin WHair setting roller and method of use
US5706837 *30 Oct 199513 Jan 1998Iwata; HidenobuHair bundling core and method of using the core
US5769101 *2 Apr 199723 Jun 1998Yonesho Company, Ltd.Hair bundling core and method of using the core
US5839450 *11 Jun 199824 Nov 1998Glasscock; EdwinaHair curler
US5845655 *6 Aug 19978 Dec 1998Yonesho Company Ltd.Hair bundling core and method of using the core
US63639455 Oct 20002 Apr 2002Frankie RobersonCylindrical hair roller cover having a protective flap
EP0095164A2 *20 May 198330 Nov 1983The Gillette CompanyHair treating article and a method of its use
Classifications
U.S. Classification132/250, D28/37
International ClassificationA45D2/14, A45D2/00
Cooperative ClassificationA45D2/14
European ClassificationA45D2/14