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Publication numberUS2855324 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication date7 Oct 1958
Filing date7 Apr 1955
Priority date7 Apr 1955
Publication numberUS 2855324 A, US 2855324A, US-A-2855324, US2855324 A, US2855324A
InventorsW. G. Van
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
van dorn
US 2855324 A
Images(3)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 7, 1958 w. G. VAN DORN 2,855,324

CONTACT TRANSFER FOR XEROGRAPHY Filed April '7, 1955 :5 Sheets-Sheet 1 RESIN COAT/NC 6 DOCTOR BLADE /2 8A 55 PAPER 7-0 THERM 0 5n T INVENTOR WARREN G. VAN DOE/V ATTORNEY Oct. 7, 1958 w. G. VAN DORN 2,855,324

CONTACT TRANSFER FOR XEROGRAPHY Filed April 7, 1955 s Sheets-Sheet 2 HO 7" PLATE A L UM/NUM PLATE 5 THERMO STA T ENVENTOR WARREN G. VAN Don/v BY I ATTORNEY Filed April "I, 1955 w. cs. VAN DORN 2,855,324

CONTACT TRANSFER FOR XEROGRAPHY 5 Sheets-Sheet 3 HEATED INVENTOR giRREN 6. VAN DORN @JQM ATTORNEY 2,855,324 Patented, Oct. 7, 1958 CONTACT TRANSFER FOR XEROGRAPHY Warren G. Van Dorn, Columbus, Ohio, assignor, by mesne assignments, to Haloid Xerox Inc., Rochester, N. Y., a corporation of New York Application April 7, 1955, Serial No. 499,784

7 Claims. (Cl. 117-25) This invention relates to xerography, and in particular to the transfer of electroscopic particles used in the developing process.

In the art of xerography as disclosed in Carlson Patent No. 2,297,691, it is usual to place an electrostatic charge on a xerographic member which is generally composed of a photoconductive layer overlying a conductive back ing. This charged member is then exposed to copy to be reproduced and the electrostatic charge on the photoconductive insulating layer is selectively discharged, thereby leaving an electrostatic latent image on the photoconductive surface. This latent image may then be developed by depositing thereon electroscopic particles carrying charges opposite to those composing the electrostatic latent image. These charged particles adhere to areas of charge on the insulating layer,'thereby developing an electrostatic image pattern. This image pattern may be utilized as it exists on the surface of the insulating layer, or it may be transferred to other materials. This invention deals primarily with methods, means and apparatus of transfer which improve upon past processes of transfer.

One of the usual methods of transfer is to cause particles of electroscopic material to move from the insulating surface to another surface by the use of electrostatic forces. Another is to apply adhesive to thetransfer sheets and rely upon adhesion of powder to the transfer sheets for transfer of the developed image thereto. This invention is concerned with new techniques of transfer including the use of new transfer materials and contact transfer in substitution both for electrostatic or adhesive transfer procedure.

'Advantages of the new techniques are the ability to bring about a better transfer and so as an end result a finer xeographic reproduction than if the usual electrostatic or adhesive types of transfer are used. For example, more of'the developer articles are removed from the insulating surface of the xerographic plate to the transfer surface when the techniques and transfer materials of this invention are utilized as compared with the usual transfer techniques noted above. fer of more developer particles is of particular value in many important instances where the image is not excessively dense. Another object, therefore, of this invention is to provide means, methods and apparatus to produce finer andmore accurate and faithful xerographic transfers. I

Further objects and features of the invention are to provide methods, means and apparatus of transfer of xerographic images onto a transfer surface by contact and pressure, and in which the transfer surfaces do not have conventional adhesive properties previously thought necessary for effecting eflicient transfers.

As further objects and features, this invention contemplates the utilization of resin surfaces or layers, which may be self supporting, and optionally and preferably are coated onto paper or other backing materials to provide va desirablev transfer surface onto which the image This trans- 2 on the xerographic element may be efiectively transferred by contact under pressure.

As still additional objects, the invention contemplates the utilization of thermoplastic resins normally non-tacky at room temperature, preferably coated onto paper or other backing materials, to provide a desirable transfer surface on which the image may be effectively transferred by contact under pressure and to which it may be fixed by heat or by heat and pressure.

Thermoplastic resins presently found most suitable for the practice of the invention are polyethylenes of very low, low, medium or high molecular Weights. These polyethylenes are available commercially, one source being the Bakelite Corporation of New York Whose polyethylene products as follows have been utilized in the practice of this invention:

Bakelite DXL-4, a polyethylene having a relatively very low molecular weight of 4000, a softening temperature of 93 C. and a melt viscosity at 130 C. of 5.2

polses;

Bakelite DYGT, a polyethylene having a relatively low molecular Weight of 7000, a softening temperature of 98 C. and a melt viscosity at 130 C. of poises;

Bakelite DYLT, a polyethylene having a relatively medium molecular weight of 12,000, a softening temperature of 104 C., and a melt viscosity at C. of 3 10 poises; and

Bakelite DYNF, a polyethylene having a relatively high molecular weight of 19,000, a softening temperature of 108 C. and a melt viscosity at 130 C. of 4X10 poises.

Other thermoplastic resins such as modified polystyrene-type resins, e. g. Piccolastic D-75, a polymerized blend of styrene, substituted styrene and homologs thereof of relatively low degree of polymerization which is a product of Pennsylvania Industrial Chemical Company, Clairton, Pennsylvania, and polyamide resins such as polyamide resin A R 316, a product of the 'Minnesota Mining and Manufacturing Company of St. Paul, Minnesota, and believed to be similar to the resin of U. S. Patent No. 2,692,253, are also contemplated as useful in practicing the invention. As described in this patent, the polyamide resins, are obtained by reacting together, at a high temperature, substantially equimolar proportions of either terephthalic or isophthalic acid with a combination of a plurality of polyglycols having an average of at least two ether linkages and at least one noncyclizable primary amino monoalkanolamine having a non-tertiary carbon atom attached to the nitrogen atom; the polyglycols and monoalkanolamines being so selected and proportioned as to provide an average of about 3-12 ether linkages and one amido group having a single hydrogen atom attached to the nitrogen atom for approximately each 25-90 atoms in the skeletal polymer chain. Such amide-ester polymers are soluble in isopropanolxylol and are curable to a solvent-resistant, rubbery state by heating with small proportions of aldehydic curing agents. Similarly useful are blends of these resins, such as particularly blends of polyethylene and blends of resins with other materials such as waxes or the like, including blends of polyethylene with microcrystalline waxes.

In practicing the invention, base material such as papers which are coated with the polymeric thermoplastic resin of the types herein mentioned preferably are white papers such as baryta papers ordinarily used as base stock of photographic papers, or similar white papers that will receive and retain a coating of the resins mentioned. An example of such similar white papers is a high quality printing paper (regular printing, not photographic printing) which has a smooth, glossy finish and which generally is a clay coating with a casein binder. Such paper is known commercially as Kromekote paper, a product of 3 Champion Paper and Fiber Company of Hamilton, Ohio.

The transfer members used for practicing the invention are prepared by coating a base material such as paper with thermoplastic resins of the character mentioned and thereafter effecting contact transfer to such transfer members by use of controlled amounts of pressure. A characteristic feature of the transfer members is that their coatings are normally non-tacky at usual room temperatures so that adhesion as such is not a characteristic relied upon for effecting transfer to such members.

Other objects and features of the invention will become apparent from the following specification and the accompanying drawings, wherein:

Fig. 1 shows an isometric view of a transfer member;

Fig. 2 is a diagrammatic view of one means and apparatus for preparing the transfer member;

Fig. 3 and Fig. 4 are successive diagrammatic views of alternative and presently preferred means and apparatus for preparing the transfer member.

Fig. 5 is a diagrammatic view showing means and method for the transfer of a developed image pattern to a transfer member; and

Fig. 6 is a diagrammatic view of means and method for fixing a transferred image on the transfer member.

Referring to the drawings, in Fig. 1, a transfer member, generally designated as 10, is shown. The transfer member 10 is generally composed of a thermoplastic resin layer orcoating 11 on a base material 12. Generally, the coating 11 is one of the thermoplastic resins mentioned, or a combination of such resins that has low enough melt viscosity to permit both hot melt coating of the base material therewith and the heat fixing of a transferred image in the coating and which coating has very little, if any, tackiness at ordinary room temperature (60-80 F.). In addition, these resins generally have melting points between 150 F. and 300 F., or at least below the scorch point of the base material 12 used. Included in the class of thermoplastic resins meeting these requirements are polyethylenes, polyamides, polystyrene and other polymeric resins of the kind hereinabove specifically mentioned. 'Also included are other thermoplastic resins having characteristics meeting the foregoing requirements.

Any material capable of being coated with a thermoplastic resin of the character described is a suitable base material 12. This includes, but is in no way limited, to paper, film, glass, cloth, synthetic materials, metallic foils such as aluminum foil, and the like. A preferred type of base material 12 is white paper such as baryta coated paper similar to the base stock of photographic papers. Included are 5.5 mil, 3.5 mi], and other baryta coated papers of intermediate thickness. In practice, the preferred paper is 5.5 mil baryta coated paper which is whiter and less apt to wrinkle during transfer than other papers. Furthermore, the baryta surface of this paper is very smooth and apparently prevents bubbling of the polyethylene resin of the coating 11 that may be encountered when other papers are used.

One method of preperation of a transfer member 10 comprising a polyethylene layer 11 on a base material 12 of baryta coated paper as illustrated diagrammatically in Fig. 2 is to clamp a sheet'12 of such baryta paper face up on an aluminum plate 13. With the plate heated by a heating device 14 to a temperature of about 300 F., a small quantity of polyethylene resin 15 is deposited on the heated paper sheet 12. After the resin has melted completely, the molten resin is smoothed out on base 12 into a coating 11 one to five mils thick. This is done for example by a metal doctor blade 16 having a polished edge 17 and a handle 18 of heat insulating material. In practice, the blade 16 is tilted at an angle of about during the spreading operation. This is a hot-melt method of resin coating application to the base material 12.

An alternative arrangement for preparing a transfer member 10 is illustrated diagrammatically in Figs. 3 and 4. Therein a sheet 12 of base material is stretched taut by fastening its corners to a frame 19 positioned vertically over a shallow pan, tray or container 20. A liquid solution 21 of thermoplastic resin in appropriate solvent is poured from a container 22 onto the vertical sheet 12 and allowed to flow down its surface. When applying resins consisting of polyethylene or containing polyethylene the solution is generally applied hot, and such solution retained by the sheet 12 jells almost immediately as it cools below 60 C. and leaves coatings from A; to 1 mil thick on the sheet 12. The excess or runoff liquid is collected in the pan 20 for reuse. It is preferable when applying the hot solution 22 to effect an even number of coatings by pouring the solution over sheet 12 alternately from its opposite ends. The frame 19 is inverted after each pouring. This procedure produces more uniform thickness of the coatings as compared with a single pouring of the hot solution.

The coated sheet is then dried. For example it may be deposited on a plate 23 heated by an appropriate heating device 24 to a controlled temperature ranging from approximately 60 C. to C. to evaporate the solvent in the coating on sheet 12. In the alternative, radiant heat may be directed against sheet 12 to evaporate the solvent with either drying arrangement. The resulting product is the transfer member 10 of Fig. l in which the thermoplastic resin coating 11 is smooth and uniform and ranges in thickness from about /a mil to 1 mil, or any other desired thickness depending upon the number of pourings and the concentration of the solution used.

Other methods of applying the thermoplastic resin coating to the sheet 12 of base material may be utilized. A conventionally known extrusion lamination process commonly utilized commercially for applying coating to base sheet material may be utilized in preparing the transfer member 10. The methods of transfer member preparation described herein are merely exemplary and are not to be construed as being included by way of limitation.

A transfer member 10 provided as hereinabove described or in other ways have Xerographic powder images of a xerographic plate or element transferred to it in a manner now to be described.

A xerographic image is composed of many small particles which remain in position due to electrostatic forces. Often they are located on the original xerographic plate element. However, they may be on another surface as, for example, one to which they have been transferred through the use of electrostatics. Either while on an original plate or on such a surface where they are held in place due to electrostatic forces, they may be transferred to a resin coated transfer member 10 of this invention.

To eifect such transfer, the member 10 is placed with its resin coating 11 against the xerographic image 25 carried on an image bearing surface 26 of for example a xerographic plate 27, as is shown in Fig. 5. These assembled components are deposited on a transfer table 28 and the surface 26 and the transfer member 10, while in contact are firmly pressed together between pressure and driven rolls 29 and 30 to cause the image body 25 to be thoroughly embedded in or attached to the coating 11 of the transfer member 10. The amount of pressure used at the rolls will depend on many factors as, for example, the height of the raised image 25, the thickness of the coating 11 and of the base material 12 and the like.

One means of exerting the pressure is shown in Fig. 5. The pressure roll shaft 31 is supported by a lever arm 32 which is fulcrumed at 33 from a support member 34 carried by the base 28. Selected weights 35 of determined amounts are suspended from the lever arm 32 to exert pressure on roll 29 toward roll 30 in an amount sufficient to press the raised image 25 into the resin surface 11 of the transfer member 10 when'the latter and the xerographic plate 27 pass betweenrolls 29 and 30. The pressure exerted by roll 29 may be varied by changing the number and size of the suspended weights 35. In addition, a cushioning sheet 36 may be applied to the uncoated surface of member before it passes between rolls 29 and 30. Use of cushioning sheet 36 is optional and is not always required. Other means for exerting and varying the pressure may be employed. The rolls 29 and 30 may be composed of many substances, for example, steel or hard rubber, and if necessary may have rubber or other resilient coverings 29a and 30a.

Pressure also may be applied by manually rolling a rubber covered roller across the assembly of the transfer member and the image carrying surface lying on a fiat table. However, in such event great care must be exe rcised to apply uniform pressure during rolling because uneven pressures may bring about uneven transfers of the xerographic image pattern 25 to the transfer sheet and thus poor reproduction of the original image. In general, a mechanized application of pressure is preferable because of the uniformity of pressure that can be exerted.

After pressure has been applied as described, the transfer member 10 is removed from contact with the surface 26 and will carry within and on its resin layer 11 the image pattern 25. At this point transfer is complete.

The transfer member 10 may then be subjected to further treatment to fix the image 25 thereon. For example, the transfer member 10 bearing the image 25 may have the transferred image 25 heat fixed to it as by heating the member 10 until the resin coating melts and absorbs all the powder of the transferred image 25. The heating is followed by rapid cooling. This is accomplished easily as illustrated in Fig. 6 by drawing the uncoated face of the base material 12 over a curved metal surface 40 heated above the melting point of the thermoplastic resin in the coating 11. The time required to fix the image 25 by such conduction heating is only a few seconds. High temperatures on a larger surface area 40 will decrease fixing time. With relatively thick resin coatings 11 on thick base material, more fixing time is required. While other methods of fixing are adequate and, in fact, desirable for many purposes, heat fixing is particularly useful and preferred for most purposes as being rapid and convenient.

EXAMPLES Example I Baryta coated paper ranging in thickness from 3.5 mils to 5.5 mils was coated by the hot solution method of Fig. 3 with a by weight solution of low molecular weight (7000) polyethylene (Bakelite DYGT) in trichloroethylene, the solution being heated above 60 C. to produce polyethylene coated paper sheets with smooth, uniform coatings about mil to 1 mil thick. The solution poured over the sheets of paper gelled almost immediately as it cooled below 60 C. The coated sheets then were heated in the apparatus of Fig. 4 at a temperature of from 60 C. to 80 C. to evaporate the solvent of the coatings.

Transfer members 10 produced as just described were then utilized to transfer an image thereto by the meth- 0d and means of Fig. 5. During transfer pressures on the roll 29 which was rubber covered of approximately 70 to 600 pounds per linear inch were employed. "Velocity of the assembly during transfer was from 2-4 inches per second. Subsequently, the transferred image was fixed to the transfer members 10 by heatingthe curved surface to approximately 250 to 700 F. and drawing the transfer members 10 across said surface at a rate of from 2-6 inches per second. The fixation time is of the order of a few seconds or less. Higher temperatures or large surface contact between the transfer member and heating surface will decrease fixing time,

while relatively thick coatings on thick paper require more fixing time.

Baryta papers provided with thinner of the polyethylene coatings, i. e. less than 1 mil thick, are found to produce very desirable results and as far as is presently known 3.5 mil baryta coated paper with a 7000 molecular weight polyethylene (Bakelite DYGT) appears to produce one of the best transfer members of those prepared in accord with this example.

In another instance a baryta coated base paper 4.2 mils thick coated with a 0.2 mil 7000 molecular weight polyethylene (Bakelite DYGT) produced satisfactory transfer with a pressure of 400 pounds per linear inch applied to a steel roll 29 one inch in diameter. The rubber covering 29a of roll 29 was of an inch thick and had a Rex gage hardness of 85. Roll 30 was of steel and had a rubber covering 30a which was of an inch thick and had a Rex gage hardness of 87. Roll 30 was of an inch in diameter. In addition, the transfer member 10 was backed on its uncoated side by a cushioning sheet of 5 /2 mil baryta coated paper coated with 1 mil'of Bakelite DYGT resin coating. Velocity during transfer was 3 inches per second. Heat fixation over curved surface 40 was eifected at a temperature of 450 F. at a velocity of 3 inches per second.

On the basis of present experimental results, conditions probably most useful in transferring and fixing images to paper coated with Bakelite polyethylene DYGT are believed to be the following:

Thickness of coating 11 (polyethylene, molecular weight ap p r ox. 7000 Bakelite DYGT) 0.2 to 0.25 ml. Paper 12Baryta coated with thickness 4.0 to 4.5 mils. Method of applying coating Hot solution. Transfer roll 29 Steel l-P/s" diameter. Rubber covering 20a None to ,4 thick. Transfer roll 30 Steel diameter. Rubber covering 30a thick. Cushioning material 36 None to 23 mils thick. Pressure on roll 29 to 400 pounds per linear inch.

Velocity during transfer 24 inches per second. Heat fixing temperature of heater 40 300 to 500 F, Velocity during heat fixation" 2 to 4 inches per second.

Example 11 Baryta-coated paper ranging in thickness from 3.5 mils to 5.5 mils was coated by the hot melt method of Fig.- 2 with polyethylene of relatively low molecular weight (e. g. 7000), namely Bakelite DYGT, by heating plate 13- to a temperature of about 300 F. and smoothing the coating onto the baryta coating of base paper sheet 12 with the doctor blade 16 to provide a polyethylene coating 11 one to eight mils thick on said sheet 12. The transfer member 10 so produced was then utilized to transfer an image 25 thereto by the method and means of Fig. 5. During transfer pressure on the roller 29 of approximately 70 to 600 pounds per linear inch were employed. With the thinner coatings the steel roller 29 was rubber covered and with the thicker coatings it was not. Subsequently, the trans ferred image was fixed to the transfer member 10 by heating surface 40 to approximately 250-700 F. and drawing member 10 across said surface at a rate of about 5 linear inches per second.

Example 111 Baryta papers coated with high molecular weight polyethylene, for example, Bakelite DYNF (molecular weight 19,000 by extrusion lamination to produce a smooth, highly-finished surface were prepared. Acceptable transfers to transfermembers 10 carrying such high molecular weight coatings by the process of Fig. 5 could be produced. How

ever, complete fixation of very dense images was not found to be possible with heat alone. A possible reason for this difficulty is believed to be the high melt viscosity of high molecular weight polyethylenes as a result of which the coating will not absorb the image powder. Nevertheless, complete fixation of such dense images can be achieved by a combination of heat and pressure.

Example IV Commercially available baryta paper coated with a blend of high molecular weight polyethylene and microcrystalline wax in which the polyethylene and the wax were blended in the proportions of approximately 60% by weight of polyethylene and 40% by weight of microcrystalline wax were utilized as transfer members. It was found that such paper required heating prior to transfer by passage under a 200 watt radiant heater at the rate of one inch per second about one inch below the heater, to eliminate film deposition on the face of the xerographic element carrying the developed powder image. It was found necessary in addition to effect image transfer to such a transfer element and heat fixation within ten minutes after initial heat treatment else bubbles would appear due to moisture absorbed in the paper.

In substitution for the low molecular weight polyethylene of Example I, it is proposed to coat 3.5 mil baryta paper with a one mil coating of a blend of high molecular weight polyethylene Bakelite DYNF (molecular weight 19,000) and and refined microcrystalline wax in the proportions of 60% by weight of Bakelite DYNF and of 40% by weight of microcrystalline wax. A transfer member of such composition is believed will be substantially equal in performance to transfer members prepared according to Examples I and II. Blends of high and low molecular weight polytheylene resins as coatings are also believed to be useful.

Example V Transfer members 10 were prepared according to the method of Examples I or II utilizing very low molecular weight polyethylene, e. g. Bakelite DXL-4 molecular weight 4,000) as the thermoplastic resin coating. Such members are found to produce satisfactory transfers but attempts to fix the transfers by heat result in image distortion. Moreover, such coatings are slightly softer than common paraflin and are easily scratched or damaged, although this deficiency can be largely eliminated by other means of fixing such as spraying or otherwise applying a resin or like layer over the surface, or by pressure fixing.

Example VI Transfer members 10 were prepared according to the methods of Examples I and II utilizing medium molecular weight polyethylene such as Bakelite DYLT (molecular weight 12,000) as the thermoplastic resin coating. Such members are found to produce satisfactory transfers. Fixation of the transferred images, however, require slight increase in time and temperature during fixation.

Example VII Transfer members 10 prepared according to the methoils of Example I utilizing Kromekote paper as the base material 12 and modified polystyrene-type resin, namely Piccolastic D-75, as the coating agent are found to produce satisfactory transfer and fixation and a clear, glossy, non-curling picture. Some objectionable features of such transfer members, however, were occasional stick ing to the xerographic element during transfer steps and occasional sticking to surfaces as that of a similar print stacked on top if left in contact for long periods of time.

Example VIII Transfer members prepared according to Example II utilizing thermoplastic polyarnide resin AR316 hereinabove described also provided satisfactory transfer and fixation. The brown color of the resin produced tan highlights which would be satisfactory for most purposes.

Example IX Transfer members 10 prepared according to Example I and having coatings consisting of a first layer of higher molecular weight polyethylene resin coated with the lower molecular weight resins prepared either by the methods of Examples I or II or by combinations thereof are also believed to be useful in practicing the invention.

Although in many respects this invention resembles transfer of the adhesive type, in actuality it differs therefrom since the transfer coating surface 11 is substantially non-tacky at usual room temperatures. With adhesive transfer, particles of the image pattern are retained by stickiness of the tacky surface. In the practice of this invention, however, the electroscopic particles are held by the coating 11 without tackiness, either by being physically encased or embedded in the surface of the coating or by contact electrification caused by the very close physical contact of such embedding into the surface.

With adhesive transfer, often the adhesive coating will adhere to the developed image bearing surface rather than to its backing member and create breaks or holes in the final product. With transfers of the instant invention, this problem does not exist. Where highly adhesive transfer surfaces are utilized, they frequently flake off the photoconductive layers of xerographic elements during transfer steps by reason of adhesion. This problem likewise does not occur with the practice of the instant invention where contact transfer is effected.

This invention is of particular value where high quality reproductions are required, for example, in continuous tone xerography. The presently preferred developed continuous tone image often may be of low density and the transfer of such an image must be substantially complete. To produce a valuable final product in the case of continuous tone images, substantially all of the developed image must be transferred, and the particles making up the image must remain in their proper positions on the transfer material. This is accomplished by practicing the instant invention.

The image formed according to the practices of this invention is a permanent image. There is no necessity for overcoating the transferred image with spray fixatives or other protective coverings. The thermoplastic resin coating of the materials herein described provides a reasonably hard glossy transparent and permanently finished surface in which the powder particles are embedded and fixed. The surface is relatively hard as compared with latex or gelatin or tacky compound surfaces and is long lasting and wear resistant. The thermoplastic resin coating of the transfer member may be applied to transparent or translucent base materials instead of paper where badges or similar articles are to be manufactured. Where the base material is one of the papers herein mentioned, whiteness, brightness and smoothness of the product are noteworthy attributes.

It is apparent that in practicing the instant invention the preferred transfer member embodies a paper base material provided with a coating of thermoplastic resin of the type having a low enough melt viscosity or ready enough solubility to permit ready coating of paper therewith to thickness of the order of from fractional mil thickness to thicknesses of several mils, said resin having melting points between approximately 150 F. and 300 F. or other temperatures below the scorch point of the paper or other base material and having very little tackiness at usual room temperatures of from 60 to F.

While specific methods, means and examples of materials useful in practicing the invention have been described herein, variations in any or all thereof within the scope of the appended claims are possible and are contemplated. There is no intention, therefore, of limi- 9 tation to the exact details of disclosure as herein made.

,What is claimed is:

1. A method of transfer for xerographic powder image bodies on a support member comprising providing a base member having a coating of a resin selected from the group consisting of polyethylenes whose molecular weights range from about 4,000 to about 19,000; polyamides obtained by reacting together at a high tempera ture substantially equimolar proportions of an acid selected from the group consisting of terephthalic and isophthalic acid With a combination of a plurality of polyglycols having an average of at least two ether linkages and at least one non-cyclizable primary amino monoalkanolamine having a non-tertiary carbon atom attached to the nitrogen atom, the polyglycols and monoalkanolamines being so selected and proportioned as to provide an average of about 312 ether linkages and one amido group having a single hydrogen atom attached to the nitrogen atom for approximately each 25-90 atoms in the skeletal polymer chain; and mixtures of polyethylenes having a molecular weight of at least about 4,000 with up to 40% by Weight of refined microcrystalline Wax, said coating being substantially non-tacky at room temperature, contacting the coating on said base member with the powder image on said support member and pressing said coating and image together to thereby transfer said powder image to said resin coating at substantially room temperature and removing said base member with its A coating from contact with said support member whereby the image bodies are transferred from the support member to the base member in faithful conformity to their original configuration without damage to the support member.

2. A method of transfer for xerographic powder image bodies on a support member comprising providing a base member having a coating of a resin selected from the group consisting of polyethylenes whose molecular weights range from about 4,000 to about 19,000, said coating being substantially non-tacky at room temperature, contacting the coating on said base member with the powder image on said support member and pressing said coating and image together to thereby transfer said powder image to said resin coating at substantially room temperature and removing said base member with its coating from contact with said support member whereby the image bodies are transferred from the support member to the base member in faithful conformity to their original configuration without damage to the support member.

3. A method of transfer for xerographic powder image bodies on a support member comprising providing a base member having a coating of a resin selected from the group consisting of polyamides obtained by reacting together at a high temperature substantially equimolar proportions of an acid selected from the group consisting of terephthalic and isophthalic acid with a combination of a plurality of polyglycols having an average of at least two ether linkages and at least one non-cyclizable primary amino monoalkanolamine having a non-tertiary carbon atom attached to the nitrogen atom, the polyglycols and monoalkanolamines being so selected and proportioned as to provide an average of about 3-12 ether linkages and one amido group having a single hydrogen atom attached to the nitrogen atom for approximately each 25-90 atoms in the skeletal polymer chain, said coating being substantially non-tacky at room temperature, contacting the coating on said base member with the powder image on said support member and pressing said coating and image together to thereby transfer said powder image to said resin coating at substantially room temperature and removing said base member with its coating from contact with said support member whereby the image bodies are transferred from the support member to the base member in faithful conformity to their original configuration without damage to the support member.

4. A method of transfer for xerographic powder image bodies on a support member comprising providing a base member having a coating of a resin selected from the group consisting of mixtures of polyethylenes having a molecular Weight of at least about 4,000 with up to 40% by weight of refined microcrystalline wax,- said coating being substantially non-tacky at room temperature, contacting the coating on said base member with the powder image on said support member and pressing said coating and image together to thereby transfer said powder image to said resin coating at substantially room temperature and removing said base member with its coating from contact with said support member whereby the image bodies are transferred from the support member to the base member in faithful conformity to their original configuration without damage to the support member.

5. A method of transfer for xerographic powder image bodies on a support member comprising providing a base member of baryta coated paper from 3.5 to 5.5 mils thick, having a coating of a resin selected from the group consisting of polyethylenes whose molecular weights range from about 4,000 to about 19,000, said coating being substantially non-tacky at room temperature, contacting the coating on said base member with the powder image on said support member and pressing said coating and image together to thereby transfer said powder image to said resin coating at substantially room temperature and removing said base member with its coating from contact with said support member whereby the image bodies are transferred from the support member to the base member in faithful conformity to their original configuration without damage to the support member.

6. A method of transfer for xerographic powder image bodies on a support member comprising providing a base member of a baryta coated paper sheet from 3.5 to 5.5 mils thick, having a coating from one-fourth to one mil thick of a resin selected from the group consisting of polyethylenes whose molecular weights range from about 4,000 to about 19,000, said coating being substantially non-tacky at room temperature, contacting the coating on said base member with the powder image on said support member and pressing said coating and image together to thereby transfer said powder image to said resin coating at substantially room temperature and removing said base member with its coating from contact with said support member whereby the image bodies are transferred from the support member to the base member in faithful conformity to their original configuration without damage to the support member.

7. A method of transfer for xerographic powder image bodies on a support member comprising providing a base member having a coating of a resin selected from the group consisting of polyethylenes whose molecular weights range from about 4,000 to about 19,000; polyamides obtained by reacting together at a high temperature substantially equimolar proportions of an acid selected from the group consisting of terephthalic and isophthalic acid with a combination of a plurality of polyglycols having an average of at least two ether linkages and at least one non-cyclizable primary amino monoalkanolamine having a non-tertiary carbon atom attached to the nitrogen atom, the polyglycols and monoalkanolamines being so selected and proportioned as to provide an average of about 3-12 ether linkages and one amido group having a single hydrogen atom attached to the nitrogen atom for approximately each 25-90 atoms in the skeletal polymer chain; and mixtures of said polyethylenes with up to 40% by weight of refined microcrystalline wax, said coating being substantially non-tacky at room temperature, contacting the coating on said base member with the powder image on said support member and pressing said coating and image together to thereby transfer said powder image to said resin coating at substantially room temperature,

11 12 removing said base member with its coating from con- 2,448,799 Happoldt et a1 Sept. 7, 1948 tact with said support member whereby the image bodies 2,471,102 Fish May 24, 1949 are transferred from the support member to the base 2,556,078 Francis June 5, 1951 member in faithful conformity 'to their original con- 2,661,289 Mayo et a1 Dec. 1, 1953 figuration without damage to the support member and 5 2,693,416 Butterfield Nov. 2, 1954 fusing the image bodies to the base member by heat. 9 Newberg et a1 P 9 2,714,571 Irion et a1 Aug. 2, 1955 References Cited in the file of this patent OTHER REFERENCES UNITED STATES PATENTS 10 Schafiert et al.: Xerography: A New Principle of 122,636 Muller 9, 1372 Photography and Graphic Reproduction, Journal Op- 2,153,553 FaWCett et a1 P 11, 1939 tical Society of America, vol. 28, No. 12 (Dec. 1948), 2,221,776 Carlson Nov. 19, 1940 991-996, 9 I I 1942 Bentzer: Baryta Paper, Paper Trade Journal, Feb. 5.. 2,353,717 Francis et a1 July 18, 1944 15 1925, 195 a d 199

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Classifications
U.S. Classification430/125.32, 101/DIG.370, 428/332, 428/336
International ClassificationG03G13/16, G03G7/00
Cooperative ClassificationG03G7/0046, G03G7/004, Y10S101/37, G03G13/16
European ClassificationG03G13/16, G03G7/00B4B4, G03G7/00B4B6