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Publication numberUS2812765 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication date12 Nov 1957
Filing date19 Dec 1955
Priority date19 Dec 1955
Publication numberUS 2812765 A, US 2812765A, US-A-2812765, US2812765 A, US2812765A
InventorsBenjamin F Tofflemire
Original AssigneeBenjamin F Tofflemire
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Combination aspirator and fluiddelivering surgical instrument
US 2812765 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

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C 7 ZOFUDm 5 O- w v l m( N United States COMBINATION ASPIRATOR AND FLUID- DELIVERING SURGICAL INSTRUMENT The present invention relates to improvements in a combination aspirator and fluid-delivering surgical instrument. As used herein, the generic word fluid is used in its broader sense to denote a liquid or gas, or both. In one embodiment of the invention, there is provided a combination aspirator, irrigator and drier; while, in a modification, the drier is omitted.

As the cardinal object of this invention, it is proposed to provide a compact, multiple-function surgical instrument, which is designed in such a manner that the surgeon can instantly change the function of the instrument by a simple manipulation and without removing a tip of the instrument from the operative field, to' provide: (a) outdrawing suction, wherever and whenever aspirating action is desired, such as the removal of blood, serum or accumulated fluids; (b) incoming sterile saline solution, sterile water, or irrigating solutions used in flushing operations; (c) an incoming jet of sterile air, or carbon dioxide gas, if desired, for drying or dissipating obstructing uids that are impairing view of constricted areas in the operative field; and a complete inactivation of the instrument, when not actually in use, although instantly available when needed.

At the present time, in such work as neuro-surgery and oral surgery, there are instances where the operator needs the field of operation bathed with a sterile solution, in order to remove obstructing uids from the immediate field of operation. In such a case, either an incoming jet of warm, sterile, saline or water solution will often clarify the field. Similarly, a sterile jet of air may be required so as to dissipate accumulated fluids over a restricted and confined area, in conjunction with suction or aspirating operation. Location and removal of fractured root-tips in exodontia and oral surgery often need irrigation with sterile saline or water solutions, in conjunction with an incoming sterile air-jet, or an outgoing suction.

Currently, these individual services require a plurality or multiplicity of individual instruments. The latter clutter up the operative field, requiring additional lost motion by the operator and assistants for each and every change of function and instrument.

The present surgical instrument eliminates all of this confusion and needless lost motion. The unitary instrument herein provided responds to the requirements of the operator, while he has the instrument in hand, by a simple manipulation. Without removing the instrument from the area in which he is working, the various functions may be performed instantly, efficiently and positively.

A still further object is to provide an instrument of the character described, which is light in weight, compact, wellbalanced and sturdily constructed. It may be surgically sterilized by any of the approved methods for general surgical equipment. t

Other objects and advantages will appear as the specification continues. The novel features will be set forth in the claims hereunto appended. j

arent C 2,812,765 Patented Nov.. 12, 1957 ice Drawings For a better understanding of my invention, reference should be had to the accompanying drawing, forming part of this application, in which:

Figure 1 is a fragmentary top plan view of my combination surgical aspirator, irrigation and drier, portions being shown in section;

Figure 2 is a side elevational View thereof;

Figure 3 is an enlarged sectional View taken along the plane III-III of Figure 1;

Figures 4, 5, 6 and 7 are horizontal sectional views taken through the valve-control portion of the instrument, showing the valve adjusted for Suction, Ofi Air and Irrigatiom` respectively;

Figure 8 is a top plan view of a modified surgical instrument, similar to that shown in Figure l, but omitting the air or other gas conveying tube; and

Figure `9 is a Side elevation View of a detached tubular tip, which is adapted for use as a cannula with a trocar.

While I have shown only the preferred forms of my invention, it should be understood that various changes, or modifications, may be made within the scope of the annexed claims without departing from the spirit thereof.

Detailed description Referring to the first embodiment of my invention, as

j shown in Figures'l to 7, inclusive, I have provided a valve body indicated generally at B. This body defines a conical seat 10 on its interior upon which a multi-ported valve C is rotatably mounted. It will be noted that one end of the valve has an operating knob 11, which is disposed exteriorly of the body B,.where it is exposed for manipulation.

As shown in the drawing, a suction tube S has its forward end communicating with the interior of the valve casing through a passageway 12 formed in the latter. The rear end of this tube may be coupled by a flexible hose 14 to a source of vacuum to thus maintain a suction within the tube S.

Moreover, a tubular tip D is secured to the valve body B so as to communicate with the interior of the latter through a passageway 15. This tip projects forwardly from the valve body and defines an entrance-exit end 16,

, which may be curved in the manner shown in Figure 2 to thus facilitate its use.

With particular reference to Figure 4, it will be observed that the valve C has ports 17 and 13 formed therein, which are adapted to register with the passageways 15 and 12, respectively. These ports communicate with an axially-extending compartment 19 that is provided on the interior of the valve C. Thus, the operator may turn the valve into the position shown in Figure 4 so as to place the tubular tip D in communication with the suction tube S. This will allow aspirations to be made from the field of operation, wherever and whenever desired, such as for the removal of blood, serum or accumulated fluids.

ln order to visually indicate to the operator the position into which the valve C must be turned, for establishing suction in the tip D, the letter S has been provided on the face o-f the knob 11 (see Figure 2). This letter may be brought opposite an index mark 20, which is provided on the upper surface of the valve body B (see Figure l). When this setting lof the valve has been accomplished, the arrow 21 (see Figure 4) indicates the rearwardly flow of fluids from the tubular tip D, through the valve C, and thence into the section tube S.

As previously mentioned, the operator may desire an incoming jet of sterile air, or carbon dioxide gas, for drying or dissipating obstructing fluids, which are impairing the view of constricted areas in the operative field. For

` this reason, a gasjconveying tube A has been provided.

The forward end of this tube communicates with the interior of the valve body through a passageway 22 (see Figure 6). The rear end of the tube A may be coupled to a supply of air, or carbon dioxide gas, by a exible hose 23 (see Figure l). Y p

When the operator desires the air or carbon dioxide gas to flow to the operative field, the knob 11 is turned until the letter A thereon (see Figure 2) registers with the index mark 2). At this time, the valve C will occupy the position shown in Figure 6; and ports 24 and 25 formed in this valve will register with the passageways 15 and 22, respectively. These ports communicate with the axially-extending compartment 19. Thus the air or carbon dioxide will flow forwardly through the tube A, valve C and tubular tip D, as suggested by the arrow 26 in Figure 6, for discharge from the end 16 into the operative field. For the purpose of supplying incoming sterile saline solution, sterile water, or irrigation solutions for use in flushing operations, a liquid-conveying tube I has been provided. The forward end of this tube communicates with the interior of the valve body B through a passage- Way 27 (see Figure 7). A flexible hose 28 on the rear end of the tube I may be connected to the supply of irrigating liquid.

When an irrigation of the operative eld is desired, the knob 11 should be turned until the letter I thereon (see Figure 2) is opposite the index mark 20. At this time, ports 29 and 30 in the valve C will register with the passageways i5 and 27, respectively. Thus the liquid will flow from the tube I, through the valve C and the tip D, as suggested by the arrow 31 (see Figure 7).

For the purpose of inactivating the instrument, the knob Il may be turned until the letter O thereon (see Figure 2) registers with the index marking 20. This will bring the valve C into the position shown in Figure 5, wherein all of the ports in the valve are out of registration with the passageways in the valve body B; i. e., the valve has been turned into an Off position.

In order to releasably hold the valve C in the position to which it has been turned by the operator, a latchwasher E has been secured to a stem 32. This stem extends axially from the valve and projects to the exterior of the body B. As shown in Figure 3, this stem is noncircular in cross-section, and the washer E has a corresponding-shaped opening 33 therein, which telescopically receives the projecting end of the stem. Thus the latch-washer E is fixed to and turns with the valve.

For the purpose of yieldingly urging the latch-washer E towards the body B, a spring washer 34 is telescoped over the stem 32 so as to bear against latch-washer. Thereafter, an ordinary washer 35 is introduced over this stem, and then a pin 36 is inserted through an opening in the stem outwardly beyond the washer 35. It will be noted that a stationary detent 37 is fixed to the valve body B so as to extend radially relative to the stern 32, and immediately beneath the latch-washer. The latter is urged by the spring washer against the detent. Also, the valve C is drawn against its seat l0 by the spring washer.

As shown in Figures 3 and 5, when the valve C occupies an Off position, the detent 37 engages with a notch O', which is fashioned radially on the underneath side of the latch-washer E, thus yieldingly retaining the valve in this position of adjustment. However, when the upper portion Illa of the knob il is moved rearwardly (see Figure 2), i. e., towards the suction tube S, the detent 37 will engage in a notch S to thus yieldingly hold the valve in Suction position (Figure 4).

When the operator moves the upper part 11a of the knob l1 forwardly so as to bring the valve C into the Air position (see Figure 6), the detent 37 will engage with a notch A formed in the latch-washer E. Upon moving the upper part of the operating knob still farther forward, until the valve C moves into the Irrigation position (see Figure 7), the detent 37 will be received in a notch I of the latch-washerto yieldingly retain the valve in this position.

As shown in Figure 3, the latch-washer E has a segment of its rim removed to define shoulders 40 and 41. Also, a stop pin 42 is -xed tothe valve body B and projects therefrom. The shoulder 40 strikes this pin, when the valve C is disposed vin Suction position; while the shoulder 4l abuts this pin, when the valve is moved to "irr g l position. e

Particular attention is called to the fact that when a suction action is desired to draw blood, serum or accumulated uids rearwardly Vthrough the tubular tip D, the upper portion H0, of the knob lll is moved rearwardly. On the other hand, when fluid is to be moved forwardly thro-ugh either the gas-conveying tube A of the liquidconveying tube i, -the upper portion 11a of the knob lli is moved forwardly.` This arrangement will be of material aid to the surgeon. v

Referring to Figures l and 2, it will be seen that a transverse bar 38 has been provided with openings 39 therein, and this bar has been telescoped over the rear sections of the tubes I, A and S to hold them in spacedapart relation, Moreover, a sheath 43 has been provided to substantially enclose these tubes, with the sheath constituting a handle for the surgical instrument.

It will be aparent from the drawing that the tubes I, A and S are mounted on one side of the valve body, and the tubular tip is mounted on the opposite side thereof, the tubes and the tip being disposed substantially in the same plane. This will produce a well-balanced unit, which may be conveniently placed on a table, tray or the like. The knob lll is positioned for manual manipulation by the same hand of the operator that grasps the handle-like sheath 43. It will be found convenient to actuate this knob by the individuals thumb, or thumb and index finger, while grasping and using the instrument.

The valve mechanism provided by the body B and the conical valve C is positive in its action. The spring tension maintained by the washer 34 holds the valve upon its conical seat tti, permitting ease of operation and rendering the valve leak-proof, without requiring the use of gaskets or washers. Thus, the entire instrument may be subjected to boiling, autoclaving, or other heat-sterilization methods approved in modern operating-room procedre. Other types of valves may be employed, if desire An `additional advantage of this instrument lies in the ease of cleaning it during surgery. 'in the event of a ternporary stoppage of the aspirator, the operator may turn the knob 11 forwardly to the Air position (Figure 6), thereby permitting a jet of sterile air, or carbon dioxide gas, to clean out the lumen or passageway of the tubular tip D and its end 16, regardless of whether the stoppage 1s caused by coagulated blood, bone or tissue fragment. Also, a cleansing action may be obtained by the operator turning the valve C forwardly to Irrigation position (Figure 7), when a jet of sterile water, saline or antiseptic solution will rinse out the lumen lof the tip D. When the latter has been cleaned out, the valve C may be returned to Suction position (Figure 4) to reactivate the aspirator.

The modified form of the surgical instrument shown in Figure 8 is identical with that preivously described in connection with Figures l to 7, inclusive, except that the air tube A has been omitted in the modification. Accordingly, like reference numerals have been applied to corresponding parts of the two embodiments.

It will be appreciated, of course, that the tubular tip D may be detachably connected to the valve body B by Iany suitable means. This will permit interchangeable tips of various lengths, shapes and sizes to be employed. As suggested in the drawing, the tip D may be provided with a conical-shaped base 44, which is adapted to be inserted into a correspondingly-shaped socket 45 fashioned in the valve body B, this socket communicating with the passageway 15 (see Figures 6 and 7). In order to anchor this base in the socket, the former may be provided with a pair of radial pins 46, which are made for engagement with bayonet slots 47 that are formed in the wall surrounding the socket (see Figures l and 2). This arrangement will peimit the selected tip D to be coupled to or removed from the valve body with great rapidity by a partial rotation of the tip.

The tubular tip D shown in Figure 9 may be employed as a cannula, in which event a small iiexible rod 48 is inserted through the base 44, until a ball-like plug 49 on the forward end of this rod closes the end 16 of the tip. The rod 48 and its plug 49 define a trocar. When this has been accomplished, the tube may be inserted into the p'atients tissue or cavity, without laceration, tearing yor trauma. Of course, the trocar may be readily withdrawn, after positioning the tip D in the tissue. Thereafter, the valve body B maybe easily coupled to the base 44 of the tube.

An additional feature of the detachable tip D lies in the fact that it may be inserted into empyemic areas (for drainage and irrigation), while the plug 49 of the trocar is disposed at the end of the tip. As stated earlier, the trocar may be Withdrawn, and then the tip D is adapted to be connected to the valve body B. Either drainage or irrigation in the empyemic areas may be accomplished by actuating the valve 11 in the manner previously stated.

I claim:

l. In a combination aspirator and Huid-delivering surgical instrument: a valve body having an interior defining a seat; a suction tube and a Huid-conveying tube leading from a source of vacuum and a supply` of fluid, respectively; both of these tubes communicatiiig with the interior of the valve body; a tubular tip secured to the valve body and communicating with the interior thereof; this tip projecting from the valve body and defining an entrance-exit end; said tubes extending rearwardly from the valve body, and said tip extending forwardly therefrom; 'and a multi-ported valve rotatably mounted on the seat,

and having an operating knob positioned. exteriorly of the valve body for manual manipulation; the valve having ports for selectively placing the tubular tip in communication with the suction tube, when an upper portion of the knob is turned rearwardly toward the suction tube, whereby aspirations may be made from a eld of operation; the valve having other ports disposed for selectively placing the tubular tip in communication with the iiuid-conveying tube, when t-he upper portion `of the knob is turned forwardly toward the tubular tip, whereby fluid may be delivered to the ield of operation.

2. In a combination aspirator and fluid-delivering surgical instrument: a valve body having an interior deniug a seat; a suction tube leading from a source of vacuum; a liquid-conveying tube leading from a supply of pre-select` ed liquid; a gas-conveying tube leading from a supply of pre-selected gas; all of these tubes communicating with the interior of the valve body; a tubular tip secured to the valve body and communicating with the interior thereof; this tip projecting from the valve body and dening an entrance-exit end; and a multi-ported valve movably mounted on the seat; the valve having por-ts disposed for selectively placing the tubular tip in communication with the suction tube, when the valve is moved into one position, whereby aspirations may be made from ra eld of operation; the valve having other ports disposed for selectively placing the tubular tip in communication with the liquid-conveying tube, when the valve is moved into another position, whereby liquid may be delivered to irrigate lthe operative tield; and the valve having still further ports disposed for selectively placing the tubular tip in communication with the gas-conveying tube, whereby gas may be delivered for drying the operative field.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,314,855 Carpenter Sept. 2, 1919 1,658,754 Wood Feb. 7, 1928 2,449,497 McLeod Sept. 14, 1948 2,538,215 Stack Ian. 16, 1951

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Classifications
U.S. Classification604/32, 433/89, 604/170.1, 604/902, 604/248, 604/35, 433/91
International ClassificationA61M3/00, A61M31/00, A61M1/00, A61M13/00
Cooperative ClassificationA61M1/0064, A61M31/00, A61M13/003, A61M1/0062, Y10S604/902, A61M3/00, A61M1/0043
European ClassificationA61M31/00, A61M3/00, A61M1/00K4