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Publication numberUS2686372 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication date17 Aug 1954
Filing date16 Feb 1951
Priority date16 Feb 1951
Publication numberUS 2686372 A, US 2686372A, US-A-2686372, US2686372 A, US2686372A
InventorsGraham Glenn D
Original AssigneeGen Electric
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Clothes drying machine
US 2686372 A
Abstract  available in
Images(5)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

1954 G. D. GRAHAM 2,686,372

CLOTHES DRYING MACHINE Filed Feb. 16, 1951 5 Sheets-Sheet l INVENTOR.

Glenn 0. Graham g- 1954 G. D. GRAHAM 2,686,372

CLOTHES DRYING MACHINE Filed Feb. 16, 1951 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 Glenn D. Graham Aug. 17, 1954 G. DIGRAHAM 2,686,372

CLOTHES DRYING MACHINE Filed Feb. 16, 1951 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 MAB INVENTOR. Glenn 0. Graham AHys.

1954 G. D. GRAHAM CLOTHES DRYING MACHINE 5 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed Feb. 16, 1951 INVENTOR.

Glenn 0. Graham Affys.

1954 G. D. GRAHAM CLOTHES DRYING MACHINE 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed Feb. 16, 951

INVENTOR Glenn D. Graham Affys.

Patented Aug. 17, 1954 CLOTHES DRYING MACHINE Glenn D. Graham, Chicago, 111., assignor to General Electric Company, a corporation of New York Application February 16, 1951, Serial No. 211,415

3 Claims.

The present invention relates to clothes drying machines of the portable home laundry type and more particularly to improved clothes dry lllg machines of the general character disclosed in the copending application of Clifford E. Erickson and Glenn D. Graham, Serial No. 209,657, filed February 6, 1951.

The clothes drying machine disclosed in the Erickson and Graham application mentioned is of the portable home laundry type and comprises a rotatably mounted drum having a perforated wall and adapted to receive clothes to be dried, a casing enclosing the drum and cooperating therewith to define first and second chambers therebetween respectively disposed adjacent to the top of the drum and adjacent to the bottom of the drum, and an electric motor for rotating the drum in order to tumble the contained clothes and to produce circulation of a current of air from the first chamber through the drum into contact with the contained clothes and thence into the second chamber and back into the first chamber. An electric heating element is arranged in the first or heating chamber in order to heat the current of air passin therethrough; and a spray nozzle is arranged in the second or condensing chamber in order to cool and to scrub with a finely divided spray of cool water the current of air passing therethrough. A sump is formed in the bottom of the casing below the second chamber in order to accumulate the water, as well as condensate and lint that are condensed and scrubbed from the current of air as it is passed through the second chamber. A drain opening is formed in the bottom of the sump; and a pump is provided that communicates be tween the drain opening and the exterior, the pump being operated by the motor for the purpose of discharging to the exterior the Water and the condensate and the lint accumulatin in the sump. Also an overflow opening is provided in the side of the sump somewhat above the drain opening in order positively to prevent the accumulation of an excess head of water in the sump. Further an inlet conduit is provided that is normally supplied with cool water under gauge pressure from the city water main; and a plumbing connection is arranged between the inlet concluit and the spray nozzle.

The plumbing connection mentioned includes a solenoid controlled valve, a flow control regulator, and a vacuum breaker, all disposed exteriorly of the casing. The vacuum breaker is also disposed above the position of the overflow opening in the sump and includes an air inlet port communicating between the atmosphere and the inlet conduit and a cooperating plunger that is responsive to the pressure of the cool water in the inlet conduit when the valve occupies its open position. Thus in the arrangement when the valve occupies its open position and the pressure of the cool water in the inlet conduit is at a suitable gauge pressure, which are normal operating conditions, the plunger is operated to close the associated air inlet port and the cool water is supplied from the city water main via the inlet conduit and the plumbing connection to the spray nozzle. On the other hand, when the valve occupies its open position and in the event the abnormal condition of a sub-atmospheric pressure of the cool water in the city Water main, the plunger is operated to open the associated air inlet port, whereby air exteriorly of the casing is admitted into the plumbing connection so as positively to prevent back-siphoning of water from the sump via the spray nozzle and the plumbin connection and the inlet conduit into the city water main.

Notwithstanding the incorporation of the above-described arrangement in the clothes drying machine disclosed in the Erickson and Graham application mentioned, there is still the possibility of back-siphoning under the operating conditions noted should the head of Water in the sump rise to a level disposed above the position of the vacuum breaker included in the plumbing connection. Of course these concurrent conditions could appear only in the event that operation of the pump is arrested for a considerable time interval and that the overflow opening in the sump is stopped up with lint, or the like. However, the plumbing codes of certain cities are sufiiciently stringent that this clothes drying machine could not be connected to a city water main without additional and intervenin anti-backsiphoning apparatus.

Accordingly it is a general object of the present nvention to provide a clothes drying machine of the character described that incorporates an improved and exceedingly simple arrangement for supplying cool water to the casing thereof, which produces a finely divided spray of the cool water in the condensing chamber and which positively prevents back-siphoning of water from the sump formed in the bottom of the condensing chamber into the connected city water main under all possible concurrent operating conditions thereof.

Another object of the invention is to provide in a clothes drying machine of the character described, an improved plumbing connection to the city water main that includes a direct open air gap disposed exteriorly of the casing of the machine and through which the cool water is supplied to the casing so as to produce a finely divided spray of the cool water in the condensing chamber and so that no combination of operating conditions in the machine can possibly brin about back-siphoning of water from the sump formed in the bottom of the condensing chamber into the connected city water main.

Further features of the invention pertain to the particular arrangement of the elements of the clothes drying machine and the plumbing connection thereto, whereby the above-outlined and additional operating features thereof are attained.

The invention, both as to its organization and method of operation, together with further objects and advantages thereof, will best be understood by reference to the following specification taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, in which Figure 1 is a front perspective view of a clothes drying machine of the portable home laundry type embodying the present invention; Fig. 2 is an enlarged longitudinal sectional view, partly broken away, of the machine, taken in the direction of the arrows along the offset line 22 in Fig. 1; Fig. 3 is an enlarged rear elevational view, partly broken away, of the machine; Fig. 4 is a further enlarged fragmentary sectional view of the rear lower portion of the machine, taken in the direction of the arrows along the line 4-4 in Fig. 3; Fig. 5 is a further enlarged fragmentary sectional view of the rear lower portion of the machine, taken in the direction of the arrows along the line 5-5 in Fig. 4; Fig. 6 is a fragmentary longitudinal sectional view of the lower portion of the machine, illustrating diagrammatically the principle of operation thereof; Fig. '7 is a laterally sectional view of the machine, taken in the direction of the arrows along the line 7-1 in Fig. 6, illustrating diagrammatically the principle of operation thereof; Fig. 8 is a somewhat enlarged laterally sectional view of a modified form of the clothes drying machine embodying the present inven tion, illustrating diagrammatically the principle of operation thereof; and Fig. 9 is a somewhat enlarged fragmentary longitudinal sectional view of the lower portion of the modified form of the machine, taken in the direction of the arrows along the line 99 in Fig. 8, illustrating diagrammatically the principle of operation thereof.

Referring now to Figs. 1 to 3, inclusive, of the drawings, the clothes drying machine if there illustrated is of the portable home laundry type and of the general construction and arrangement of that disclosed in the previously mentioned Erickson and Graham application, and embodies the features of the present invention with reference to the cool water supply system to the casing thereof as described more fully hereinafter. Specifically the machine IE] comprises a substantially rectangular base H carrying an upstanding detachable cabinet l2. The cabinet l2 includes a front wall is and a pair of opposed side walls i l and I5 defining both a rear opening and a front opening. The rear opening provided in the cabinet i2 is closed by a removable rear wall I6; and the top opening provided in the cabinet i2 is closed by a removable top wall ii. The front wall. I3 is provided with a rearwardly directed rim or boundary flange l3 having side portions disposed substantially flush with the sidewalls l4 and I5, a top portion disposed substantially flush with the top edges of the side walls I l and I5, and a bottom portion disposed forwardly of the front of the base I l and cooperating therewith to define an upstanding toe-receiving recess is arranged adjacent to the lower front of the cabinet l2. Also the central portion of the front wall i3 has a substantially rectangular depression formed therein that is surrounded by a rearwardly directed boundary throat 2 i. Preferably the hollow front wall [3 is formed of one-piece die pressed construction and carries a substantially rectangular fabricated front door 22 suitably hinged thereto and arranged within the boundary throat El and movable between open and closed positions with respect to the depression 26, the front door 22 carrying a suitable handle and latch mechanism 23.

The top wall ll includes a substantially horizontally disposed work surface 2 provided with a downwardly turned rim or boundary flange 25 that includes front and side portions disposed substantially flush with the upper portions of the respective front wall l3 and side walls l4 and [5. Also the rear portion of the top wall I! terminates in a laterally extending and upwardly directed backsplash 26 that projects rearwardly of the rear wall It to defme an upstanding space 2'? disposed both below the backsplash 2G and behind the rear wall it; and employed for a purpose more fully explained hereinafter. lihe side portions of the rim 25 of the top wall I! merge into the ends of the backsplash 26 to form a smooth continuous construction. Preferably the hollow top wall I! is formed of one-piece die pressed construction. A timer switch 28 is housed within the hollow backsplash 26 adjacent to the right-hand end thereof and provided with an operating shaft extending through an opening formed therein and carrying a manual control dial 29 that is readily accessible from the exterior; and a thermostatic switch 30 is housed within the hollow backsplash adjacent to the left-hand end thereof and provided with an operating shaft extending through an opening formed therein and carrying a manual control dial 3] that is readily accessible from the exterior. Finally the central portion of the backsplash 26 carries a combination ornamental trim and lamp hood 32 that is adapted to be illuminated by an electric lamp, not shown, housed in the backsplash 25 for the purpose of illuminating the work surface 2A of the top wall II.

An upstanding substantially tubular casing 33 is housed in the front portion of the cabinet i2 and provided with front and rear walls 34 and 35 and a tubular side wall including complementary upper and lower sections 35 and 37. The casing 33 is directly supported upon the base H by an arrangement including two upstanding and laterally spaced-apart pillars 33 and 39 formed directly as a part of the base ll. A substantially cylindrical drum l i is enclosed by the casing 33 and provided with front and rear end walls ii and G2 and a perforated side wall 43. The drum G6 is mounted for rotation in the casing about its longitudinal axis disposed in a substantially horizontal position by an arrangement including a spider l-l secured to the rear surface of the rear wall 42 and carrying a rearwardly projecting drive shaft 65. The drive shaft 45 is disposed along the longitudinal center line of the drum to and projects through an opening provided in the rear wall 35 into an upstanding space 46 defined between the rear wall 35 and the rear wall I6. More particularly, the drive shaft 25 is supported for rotation in bearing structure carried by a bolster 47, that is, in turn, carried by the rear wall 35 and arranged in the upstanding space 46. The bolster 47 is further supported by two laterally spaced-apart upstanding elements 48 and 49 respectively carried by the pillars 38 and 39. Moreover the rear wall 35 is provided with an upstanding centrally disposed stiffening ridge 5!) embossed therein and extending to the bolster 37, as well as a laterally extending stiffening angle member 5|.

The boundary throat 2| surrounding the rectangular depression formed in the front wall [3 extends inwardly and terminates in an annular opening 52; the front wall 34 of the casing 33 has a substantially annular opening 53 formed therein that is surrounded by an associated stiifening ridge 54; and the front end wall 4| of the drum 4i? is provided with a centrally disposed forwardly flared annular flange 55 terminating in an annular opening 56. The annular openings 52, 53 and 56 are arranged in longitudinal alignment with each other and carry a cooperating annular throat member 5'! formed of rubber, or the like. The throat member 5i comprises first and second compressible annular asket sections 53 and 59, as well as a rearwardly and outwardly flared annular lip 66 extending into the annular flange 55. The gasket section 59 is compressed between the adjacent annular portion of the boundary throat 2| and the adjacent annular stiffening ridge 53 in order to seal the front wall l3 of the cabinet 12 to the front wall 35 of the casing 33; while the gasket section 58 is arranged between the adjacent annular portion of the boundary throat 2| and the adjacent inner surface of the front door 22 in order to seal the front opening 52 when the front door 22 occupies its closed position. Finally the extension of the annular lip 66 into the annular flange 55 presents a smooth continuous throat into the interior of the drum 38 in order to h cilitate ready placement and removal of the clothes with respect thereto. The construction and arrangement of the throat member 57 and its cooperation with the front door 22, the front wall l3 of the cabinet 12, the front wall 34 of the casing 33, and the front end wall 41 of the drum 30 are disclosed and claimed in the copending application of Clifford E. Erickson, Serial No. 218,427, filed March 30, 1951.

The upper section 36 of the tubular side wall of the casing 33 cooperates with the associated cylindrical side wall 43 of the drum 43 to define a longitudinally extending first or heating chamber 6! therebetween disposed adjacent to the top of the drum '36, in which there are arranged two circumferentially spaced-apart substantially serpentine electric heating elements 32 and 63 that are preferably of the sheathed resistance conductor type. The heating element 32 comprises a supporting plate 6 3 that is removably secured to the rear wall 35 of the casing 33 in covering relation with respect to an associated opening through which the heating element 62 is projected into the heating chamber 6|; and likewise the heating element 63 comprises a supporting plate 65 that is removably secured to the rear wall 35 of the casing 33 in covering relation with respect to an associated opening through which the heating element 63 is v rojected into the heating chamber BI. The terminals of the heating element 62 project through the plate 64 into the space 46, as indicated at 66; and likewise the terminals of the heating 6 element 63 project through the plate 65 into the space 46, as indicated at 61. The front end of the heating element 62 is anchored in place by an arrangement including a fixture 68 that is provided with a forwardly extending tab 69 that projects through a cooperating slot, not shown, formed in the front wall 34 of the casing 33; and likewise the front end of the heating element 63 is anchored in place by an arrangement including a fixture 16 that is provided with a forwardly extending tab H that projects through a cooperating slot, not shown, formed in the front wall 34 of the'casing 33. Thus it will be understood that the heating elements 62 and 63 may be readily removed from the heating chamber 6| rearwardly through the upstanding space 46 after the removal of the rear wall Hi from the cabinet l2. Arranged between the heating elements 62 and 63 and the adjacent portion of the upper casing section 36 is a longitudinally extending and substantially arcuate-shaped refiector 12 that is provided for the purpose of reflecting radiant heat toward the perforated side wall 53 of the drum 40.

The lower section 3? of the tubular side wall of the casing 33 cooperates with the associated cylindrical side Wall 43 of the drum 40 to define a longitudinally extending second or condensing chamber '33 therebetween disposed adjacent to the bottom of the drum 40. Also the lower section 3? of the tubular side wall of the casing 33 comprises a downwardly extending or dished wall defining a sump 74 in the bottom thereof, the sump 74 being disposed below the condensing chamber '53 and constituting the bottom thereof. The top of the condensing chamber '13 is defined by a longitudinally extending and generally arcuate-shaped bafiie 75 that is arranged just below the bottom of the cylindrical side wall 43 of the drum 38. As best shown in Fig. 3 and as viewed from the rear of the cabinet 12, the lower end of the upper section 36 of the tubular side wall of the casing 33 disposed on the righthand side thereof extends downwardly and away rom the adjacent portion of the cylindrical side wall 43 of the drum 38 in order to provide a scroll-shaped section that cooperates with the adjacent portion of the cylindrical side wall 43 of the drum 4G to define a compression chamber 36 therebetween that opens into the adjacent end of the condensing chamber 73 below the bailie 75; on the other hand, the lower end of the upper section 36 of the tubular side wall of the casing 33 disposed on the left-hand side thereof extends upwardly and toward the adjacent portion of the cylindrical side wall 43 of the drum at to provide an arcuate-shaped passage 16' between the adjacent open end of the condensing chamber 73 and the adjacent open end of the heating chamber 6|. lThe drum. 40 is rotated in the counterclockwise direction as viewed from the front of the machine It or in the clockwise direction as viewed from the rear of the machine it in Fig. 3. Still referring to Fig. 3, it will be understood that when the drum to is rotated in the clockwise direction, the clothes contained therein are tumbled and circulation of a current of air is produced from the heating chamber 6! into the drum 4!] through the perforated cylindrical side wall 43 thereof and into contact with the contained clothes. The air current is then circulated from the drum lfi through the perforated cylindrical side wall 43 thereof into the compression chamber 16, wherein the air is compressed and forced into the adjacent end of the condensing chamber I3. The air passes through the condensing chamber I3 between the sump I4 and the bafliei5' and thence out of the other end thereof and through the passage I6 and again into the heating chamber 6|. Moreover it is pointed out that this forced circulation of the current of air, described above, is produced solely by the rotation of the drum 40 in the clockwise direction, as viewed in Fig. 3, at a speed of approximately 50- R. P. M., together with the tumbling of the clothes contained in the drum 40, all without the usual'external blower or fan.

Also the machine I comprises an electrical motor I1 that is pivotally mounted upon the pillar 39 by an arrangement including a pivot pin I8, the motor IT being disposed in the lower rear right-hand portion of the cabinet I2 below the casing 33, as viewed from the front of the machine I9. The motor 'II comprises an operating shaft '18 having two pulleys I9 and 80 rigidly secured thereto. Also an arm 8| is pivotally mounted upon a pivot pin 82 carried by the rear wall 35 of the casing 33, which arm SI is normally biased in the counterclockwise direction about the pivot pin 82, as viewed in Fig. 3, by an arrangement including a coil spring 83 extending between the supporting element 49 and the outer end of the arm 8|. The intermediate portion of the arm 8I carries a stub shaft 84 upon which there are rotatably mounted two pulleys 85 and 86 that are rigidly secured together. Finally the rear end of the drive shaft 45 carries a pulley 8'! rigidly secured thereto. The pulley 86 carried by the operating shaft I8 of the motor 1! is belted to the pulley 85 rotatably mounted upon the stub shaft 84 by an arrangement including a flexible V-belt 88; and likewise the pulley 86 rotatably mounted on the stub shaft 84 is belted to the pulley 81 carried by the drive shaft 45 by an arrangement including a flexible V-belt 89. The pulley 80 is considerably smaller than the pulley 85; and the pulley 85 is considerably smaller than both of the pulleys 85 and 81; whereby a suitable speed reduction is obtained between the operating shaft I8 of the motor 'I! and the drive shaft 45 of the drum 40. It will be understood that the weight of the motor 11 tends to pivot it in the counterclockwise direction about the pivot pin 18', as viewed in Fig. 3, in order to tighten the belt 88 extending between the pulleys 80 and 85, whereby the tension of the belt 83 assists the coil spring 83 in pivoting the arm 8| in the counterclockwise direction about the pivot pin 82, as viewed in this figure, in order to tighten the belt 89 extending between the pulleys 86 and 81. Not only are the belts 38 and 89 tightened by virtue of the distribution of weights and by the coil spring 83, as explained above, but a substantially aligned drive is obtained through the axes of the operating shaft E8, the stub shaft 84 and the drive shaft 55, as clearly illustrated in Fig. 3. Finally it will be observed in Fig. 2 that the pulleys 80, 85, 86 and 87 are arranged in the upstanding space 46 disposed between the rear wall 35 of the casing 33 and the rear Wall I6 of the cabinet I2, whereby the pulleys noted are readily accessible from the exterior after the removal of the rear wall I6 from the associated side walls I4 and I of the cabinet I2.

Also the machine It comprises a cooling wa tersupply system embodying the features of the present invention and including, as best shown in Figs. 2 to 5, inclusive, an inlet conduit 99 that is :adapted to be supplied with cool water under gauge pressure, therear end of the inlet conduit being provided with a threaded nipple 91 that is adapted detachably to receive a flexible rubber cool water supply hose, not shown. The front end of the inlet conduit 90 communicates with a fixture 92, that, in turn, communicates with an upstanding pipe 93, the fixture 02 housing a strainer, not shown, disposed between the inlet conduit 90 and the pipe 93. The upper end-of the pipe 93 communicates with a flow control regulator 94, that, in turn, communicates with a valve 95; the valve 95 is of the solenoid controlled type and is normally biased into its closed position and provided with a solenoid 96 energizable to operate it into its open position. Further the valve 95 communicates with a-tube 9'! that terminates in a jet nozzle 98.

An opening 99 is formed in the lower portion of the rear wall 35 of the casing 33 in a position disposed below the bafile I5 and above the sump I4 and communicating with the condensing chamber 73; and a fixture I 00 is suitably secured to the rear wall 35 in cooperating relation with the opening 99. More particularly the fixture I09 comprises a substantially rectangular base IOI arranged adjacent to the outside of the rear wall 35 and suitably secured thereto and a rearwardly directed substantially U-shaped bracket I02, the intermediate portion of which carries the jet nozzle 98. Also the base lfll carries a forwardly directed arm I03 projecting through the opening 99 into the condensing chamber I3, which arm I03 carries a substantially rod-like target I04. A centrally disposed hole I05 isarranged in the base IOI; and the jet nozzle 98 is supported in a position sothat it is aligned with respect to the hole I05 and the upper portion of the rod-like target I04, the front end of the jet nozzle 98 being positioned rearwardly of the base I9I and consequently exteriorly of the condensing chamber I3. Also a substantially horn-shaped member I05 is arranged within the condensing chamber I3 between the opening 99 formed in the rear wall 35 and the target I04, the horn-shaped member I06 terminating in a substantially rectangular gasket IO'I disposed between the base I0l of the fixture I00 and the adjacent portion of the rear wall 35 surrounding the opening 99. The front face of the gasket I01 carries a substantially rectangular rim I08 that is snugly received in the opening 99, whereby the gasket I0! forms a liquid-tight connection between the base IOI of the fixture I00 and the rear wall 35 of the casing 33. The horn-shaped member I06 and the gasket I01 carried thereby are preferably formed of one-piece molded'construction of rubber, or the like. The front end of the horn-shaped member I06 flares outwardly and forwardly toward the target I04, and the rear end of the horn-shaped member I06 is arranged in the hole I05 formed in the base IOI of the fixture I00, whereby the hollow horn-shaped member I96 surrounds the space within the condensing chamber I3 disposed between the opening 99 formed in the rear wall 35 and the target I04 and is arranged between a substantially horizontal line extending from the jet nozzle 98 to the target I04 through the opening 99. Thus it will be understood that when cool water under gauge pressure is supplied via the tube 91 into the jet nozzle 98 that the pressure head of the cool water is converted into a velocity headand that the resulting high velocity jet or stream of cool water is projected from thejet nozzle 98 through the space between the jet nozzle 98 and the opening 99 formed in the rear wall 35, which high velocity jet of cool water then passes through the hole I formed in the base II of the fixture IE6 and through the horn-shaped member Ififi from the exterior of the casing 35 into the condensing chamber 73 and onto the upper cylindrical surface of the rod-like target IE4, as best shown in Fig. 4. The high velocity jet of cool water striking the target H34 is projected both upwardly toward the baflle l5 and downwardly toward the sump I4, as respectively indicated by the lines I69 and lid. of course the jet of cool water is broken up into a finely divided spray of cool water as a consequence of hitting the target IEM so that the spray is directed both upwardly and downwardly in the condensing chamber 13, as previously noted. The upwardly directed spray indicated by the lines I89 strikes the baflie l5 and is redirected downwardly so that the whole condensing chamber 73 is filled with the longitudinally projected finely divided spray of cool water extending from the front toward the rear thereof.

Of course it will be understood that the cool water under gauge pressure supplied to the inlet conduit 96 passes through the fixture 92 wherein any foreign material therein is strained therefrom and thence into the pipe 93 when the valve t5 occupies its open position. The cool water passes from the pipe 93 through the flow control regulator 96 and thence through the valve 95 and via the tube 91 into the jet nozzle 98. Preferably the how control regulator 94 is of the flexible diaphragm compression aperture or throat type that is designed to maintain a substantially constant flow of the cool water therethrough of approximately 0.4- gallon per minute, notwithstanding considerable variation of the gauge pressure of the cool water supplied to the inlet conduit 96. Also it will be appreciated that the water vapor and finely divided spray in the chamber Ed has a tendency to escape through the opening cs formed in the rear wall 35; which tendency is substantially eliminated by the arrangement including the substantially hornshaped member I06, that, in fact, provides a Venturi throat between the condensing chamber l3 and the atmosphere and surrounding the stream of cool water projected from the jet nozzle 98 onto the target I04.

The bottom of the sum it has a drain opening. l I 5 formed in the lowermost portion thereof that receives the adjacent end of a drain conduit H2 formed of molded rubber, or the like. Also a pump I i3 is suitably supported by the base II below the sump id and provided with a casing having an inlet port I M and a discharge port H5, as well as a rotatable pump element housed in the casing and provided with an operating shaft H6. The inlet port H4 is connected to the adjacent end of the drain conduit H2; and the discharge port I I5 is connected to the adjacent end of a flexible rubber drain hose iii. The operating shaft H6 has a pulley H8 rigidly secured thereto which is belted by a flexible V-belt i I 9 to the pulley I9 carried by the operating shaft E8 of the motor '51. Thus it will be understood that when the motor TI is operated, the pump H3 is operated in order to withdraw water, condensate and lint accumulating in the sump Hi through the drain conduit H2 and to discharge the water, condensate and lint through the flexible drain hose IIl. As viewed from the front of the machine It, the lower left-hand portion of the rear wall I6 has an opening I plumbing in the laundry room. The arrangement of the upstanding space 2? disposed rearwardly or" the rear wall I 6 and below the top wall ii not only conceals the cool water supply hose, not shown, and the drain hose Ill, but it also affords adequate space for these hoses when the rear of the backsplash 26 is arranged in abutting relation with respect to the wall of the laundry room.

An upstanding vent conduit I2I is arranged in the space d6, the lower end of the vent conduit I2I communicating with the casing of the pump H3, and the upper end of the vent conduit I2I communicating with the atmosphere. The arrangement of the vent conduit I2I positively prevents the possibility of a gas lock in the casing of the pump |I3 when upstanding columns of water are present both in the drain conduit H2 and in the drain hose III. Further the lower portion of the rear wall of the casing 33 carries a cup I22 that is arranged to receive a small quantity of the cool water that may dribble from the jet nozzle 38 incident to operation of the valve 95 into its closed osition. The small amount of water that may accumulate in the cup I22 is readily evaporated without the necessity of periodic emptying of the water from the cup I22.

Further the machine It! includes various instrumentalities that are employed in the electric control circuit thereof as disclosed in the; previously mentioned application of Erickson and Graham. More specifically a hydrostatic switch I23 is carried by the bottom wall of the lower casing section 3! and communicates with the sump T4, which hydrostatic switch I23 is operated to open its normally closed electrical contacts in the event of the accumulation of an abnormal and predetermined head of water in the sump id. Also a cutout switch I24 of the thermostatic type is carried by the upper portion of the upper casing section 36 and responsive to the temperature of the current of air in the general region where it leaves the heating chamber 6i and enters the drum 49. Further the thermostatic switch 30 is provided with a thermal responsive element I25 that is supported in position between the central portion of the left-hand side of the upper casing section 36 of the casing 33 and the associated side wall 43 of the drum H0, as viewed from the front of the machine I0, and responsive to the temperature of the current 0; air in the general region where it leaves the drum 4!] and enters the compression chamber 16 preceding the beginning of the condensing chamber 13. The thermal responsive element I25 is connected to the thermostatic switch 30 by a capillary tube I26 extending therebetween. Further the electric motor TI is provided with the usual start and run controller switch, not shown, that is incorporated in the end bell thereof in a conventional manner, which controller switch includes a speed responsive switch of the centrifugal type. Further the rear wall 35 supports a terminal block I27 that is adapted to terminate a flexible cable, not shown, that extends to a suitable three-wire Edison A. C. source providing 230 volts between the outside lines thereof and 115 volts between either outside line thereof and the grounded neutral line thereof; and a fuse device I21 is carried by the lower right-hand front of the base II and included in the electric circuit.

Further, it is noted that the substantially cylin drical side wall 43 of the drum carries three inwardly projecting substantially equally circumferentially spaced-apart longitudinally extending vanes I28 that not only efiect tumbling of the clothes contained in the drum 40 but also assist in producing the fanning action and the compression of the current of air in the compression chamber 16 in the manner previously explained. As best shown in Fig. 2, each of the vanes I28 comprises a substantially 'flat imperforate leading face I29 and a substantially flat imperforate trailing face I30 disposed approximately 90 with respect to each-other, the faces I29 and I30 being connected together by a smooth rounded crest NH. The leading face I29 slopes forwardly at an angle of approximately 45 with respect to a reference plane passed through the longitudinal axis of the drum 40 and the crest I3I; while the trailing face I30 slopes rearwardly at an angle of approximately 45 with respect to the reference plane noted. The crest I3I of each of the vanes I28 projects inwardly toward the longitudinal axis of the drum 40 by a distance of substantially 20% of the radial distance between the longitudinal axis thereof and the cylindrical side wall -43 thereof. This construction of the vanes I28 is very advantageous as it avoids the usual slapping and jamming of the clothes and the consequent balling thereof in the drum 40.

Specifically as a vane I28-approaches the top of its travel,- the clothes carried thereby are unfolded and-fall-therefrom back-toward the bottom of the drum 40 so that they are again gently gathered and propelled by one of thevanes I28, whereby the-clothes travel in a continuous circuit during rotation of the drum 40.

The trailing face I30 of at least one of the vanes- I28 has a longitudinaly extending depression I32 formed therein surrounding two longitudinally spaced-apart elongated access openings I33'formed therein. Finally the access openings I33 are covered .byasuitable longitudinally ex- I tending cover plate I34 arranged in the recess I32 and held in placeby-anarrangement in-. cluding a screw I35. Accordingly the cover plate I30 may be readily-removed after the removal of the screw I35 permitting access through the openings I33 into the space between the cylindrical side wall 43 of the drum 40 and the tubular sidewall of the casing 33 formed by the up per and lower casing sections 36 and 31, which arrangement permits cleaning of the space noted in the event such is necessary.

In the operation of the machine I0, the temperature that is to be maintained by the thermostatic switch 30 may beselectively adjusted by-appropriate manipulation of the control dial 3I in accordance'with the character of the fabrics to be dried. The overall time of the cycle of themachine I0 may be appropriately set by manual manipulation of the control dial 29 in accordance with whether the fabrics are to be dried to a damp-dry state or to a bone-dry state. It will, of course, be understood that by appropriate manipulation of the dial 29 the timer 28 may be-set to establish an intermediate time with respect to the minimum and maximum times thereof respectively corresponding-to the dampdry state and to the bone-dry state of the clothes to be dried; Further it is noted that after the clothes to be dried have been placed in the drum 40, the-front door 22 1s closed and the controldial 29 is rota-ted out of its normal 01f position,

whereby the timer -28 effects a complete cycle of operation of the machine l0-.-- After the complete cycle of operation of the machine, the timer 28 opens all of the electrical circuits so that the clothes-may be removed from the-drum 40 inthe dried condition after opening the front door Referring nowto Figs. 6 and '7, as a constructional example it'has'been discovered that byutilizing the drum- 40 having a length of substantially 18" and-a diameter of substantially 27", and provided-with the three inwardly directed vanes I28 'projectingtoward the longitudinal axis of the drum 40by-a distance of substantially of air in the casing 33 through the drum 40 is obtained not only bythe fanning action of the rotating drum 40 and the vanes I28 upon the air, but also by the action of the clothes falling through the space in the drum 40, as indicated by the lines I36, as the clothes are tumbled inthe drum 40." The rate of circulation of the air is substantially decreased when a smaller weight of clothes is tumbled in the drum 40; and also the rate of circulation is decreased noticeably as the load of clothes is dried. Under normal initial conditions, the rate of circulation mentioned is. obtained employing the load of 9# of clothes carrying 9# of water.

Continuing withv the operation of the machine.

l0 in the initial portion .of the cycle thereof, it maybe assumed that cool water at a temperature of approximately 60 F. is. suppliedto the inlet conduit under gauge pressure and. that the flow regulator 94 efiects the supply of about 0.4 gallon per minute of the cool water to the jet nozzle 98 when the .valve .occupies its, open position. Also it may be. assumed that whenthe heating elements 02 and 63 are energized from the 230 volts source that together they develop 4500 watts. Under these initial operating conditions, the air entering the heating chamber GI may have a temperature of approximately F. and may be substantially 100% saturated. In

passing through the heat chamber GI, the air.

may be heated to a temperature ofapproximatee ly 400 F. in order to effect a corresponding reduction. in the relativehumidity thereof. The air is then cooled somewhat in passing into the drum. land may have .atemperature of about.

375 F. upon contacting the clothes tumbling therein, as well as a low relative humidity. Due to the radiant heat projected into the drum'40 bythe heating elements 62 and 63 through the perforations formed in the side wall 43 thereof, and the hot dry air passing'through the drum 40, the wet clothes contained therein are heated to a temperature of approximately F, and dried, whereby the temperatureof the air in the aesas're drum 40 is considerably reduced and the relative humidity thereof is increased to substantially 100% saturation. After passing through the drum 40, the air enters the compression chamber 16 and may have a temperature of approximately 245 F. and may be substantially 100% saturated. The air is compressed in the compression chamber 16 and swept into the condensing chamber 13, where it is thoroughly scrubbed with the finely divided spray of cool water at the temperature of approximately 60 F. Accordingly the temperature of the air is appreciably reduced in the condensing chamber 13 in order to eifect the condensation of moisture therefrom, whereby the air may have a temperature of approximately 130 F. and may be substantially 100% saturated as it passes out of the condensing chamber 13 into the passage 16' and again toward the heating chamber 6|. Thus it will be understood that the relative humidity of the hot air in the drum 40 is increased as it is passed therethrough into contact with the contained clothes tumbled therein effecting drying of the clothes and that this moisture is transported from the drum 40 into the condensing chamber 13. This moisture in the air is given up in the condensing chamber 13 by condensation as a consequence of cooling of the air therein. Of course the condensate removed from the circulated air together with the cool water that is sprayed into the condensing chamber 13 is collected in the sump M. While the temperature of the water sprayed from the jet nozzle 98 into the condensing chamber 13 has been assumed to be about 60 F., it will be appreciated that cool water at a lower temperature is desirable in order to increase the rate at which the moisture in the air in the condensing chamber 73 is precipitated out and that cool water at a temperature of 50 F. or lower is employed when it is available; however, the machine ll! operates entirely satisfactorily employing a finely divided spray of water having a temperature as high as 90 F.

During the operation of the machine Ill, it will be appreciated that as the wet clothes contained in the drum M are dried, loose lint contained therein is picked up by the circulated current of air passing through the drum 43, whereby this loose lint is thoroughly scrubbed out of the circulated air in the condensing chamber 13 and accumulates along with the water and the condensate in the sump 14. Thus in the operation of the machine l0, not only is the water removed from the wet clothes tumbling in the drum 4!], but also the loose lint is removed therefrom. The water, the condensate and the lint accumulating in the sump T4 are removed to the exterior through the drain conduit H2 by the pump I lit in the manner previously explained. In view of the foregoing description of the general operation of the machine [0, it will be understood that since a closed air circulating system is employed no hot air is discharged into the laundry room so that there is no substantial heating of the laundry room. Furthermore the relative humidity of the air in the laundry room is not increased and no lint is blown thereinto from the machine it].

Since the air circulated in the casing 33 is heated adjacent to the upper portion thereof in the heating chamber El and is cooled adjacent to the lower portion thereof in the condensing chamber 13, the exterior surface of the casing 33 is selectively insulated. More particularly, as best shown in Fig. 2, the exterior surface of the upper casing section 36 is provided with a blanket of insulating material, indicated at I31. Likewise the exterior surface of the upper portion of the front wall 34 is provided with a blanket of insulating material, indicated at I38; and the exterior surface of the upper portion of the rear wall 35 is provided with a blanket of insulating material, indicated at I39. Similarly a blanket of insulating material, indicated at M0, is arranged between the inner and outer sheets or walls of the fabricated front door 22. On the other hand, the exterior surface of the lower casing section 3'! and the exterior surfaces of the lower portions of the front wall 34 and the rear wall 35 are exposed to the atmosphere within the cabinet 12 since the current of air circulated in the casing 33 is cooled in the lower portion thereof within the condensing chamber 13, as previously explained.

During the operation of the machine Ill, should the abnormal condition appear of a subatmospheric pressure of the water in the connected city water main, air is admitted into the jet nozzle 98 and thence via the plumbing connection, the inlet conduit and the connected cool water supply hose, not shown, into the city water main, since the valve occupies its open position at this time. However there can be absolutely no back-siphoning of water from the sump 14 under the abnormal condition noted by virtue of the open air gap provided between the end of the jet nozzle 98 and the opening 99 formed in the lower portion of the rear wall 35 of the casing 33 adjacent to the condensing chamber '13. Specifically the front end. of the jet nozzle 98 is disposed at least 1" rearwardly of the adjacent rear wall 35 of the casing 33, as indicated in Fig. 6. Thus in accordance with the water supply system of the present invention, there is absolutely no possibility of back-siphoning from the sump 54 into the city water main even though operation of the pump H3 is arrested for a considerable time interval and even though the sump 15 becomes completely filled with water, by virtue of the arrangement of the horizontal air gap between the jet nozzle 98 and the opening 99 formed in the lower portion of the rear wall 35 of the casing 33.

Referring now to Figs. 8 and 9 of the drawings, the clothes drying machine 2H1 there illustrated is of the portable home laundry type and is of the general construction of the machine In illustrated at Figs. 1 to 7, inclusive, except that a modified form of the cool water supply system embodying the features of the present invention is employed. More specifically in the machine 2"], a longitudinally extending spray pipe 258 is arranged within the condensing chamber 213 formed in the lower portion of the casing 233. The longitudinally extending body of the spray pipe 298 disposed within the condensing chamber 213 has a series of longitudinally spaced-apart openings formed in the bottom thereof so that a series of longitudinally spaced-apart downwardly directed sprays 309 of cool water may be provided to form a curtain of cool water in the lower portion of the condensing chamber 273 through which the current of air is circulated. The spray conduit 298 projects through an opening 299 formed in the rear wall 235 of the easing 233 into the upstanding space 246 disposed between the rear wall 235 of the casing 233 and the rear wall ZIB of the cabinet M2. The rear extremity of the spray conduit 298 is provided with an upwardly turned portion 309 that termiassent-2;;

natesiinrafunnel 3M. The extremity of the tube 291 included in the plumbing-connection: is pro videdcwith a' downwardly turned Hportion1291 that arranged in alignment with'the 'funnel,

3E1. Specifically the lower extremity 'of the downwardly turned portionifll of the tube 291 terminates. at least 1' above the upper: endio'f the::funnel 30! to provide an air gap :therebe other elements of the machine 218 may be iden ticalxto'those of thenmachine it) :previously' de scribed.

The operation of the. machine 2 Ill is essentially the 'same'asthat of the machine! previously described except that the cool water issupplied from the tube 297 through theassociated verticallyr disposed airxgap intothe funnel 301 and thence-into the spray conduit 298. The 'cool water supplied to the spray conduit 298 produces the :sprays '309 inthe condensing chamber 213 for the purpose of cooling and scrubbing the curerent-of: air passing 'therethrough. Also it will,

be-understood that the arrangement of'the cool water supply, system in the machine-2l0'posi-' tively prevents back-siphoning of water from the spray conduit 298 and from the condensing cham-; ber.t213 in the event of the abnormal condition of as subatmospheric "pressure in the: connected city water main; More specifically inathe event densing chamber and. that positively prevents.

back-siphoning of the water from the sump formed in the bottom of the condensingchamber into the connected city water main under allpossible concurrent operating conditions thereof.

While there has been described what is at present'considered to be the preferred embodiment of the invention, it will be understood that various modifications may be made therein, and

it isiintended to cover in the appended claims all such modifications as fall within the true spirit and scope of the invention.

What is claimed is:

1. In a clothes drying machine including a substantially horizontallydisposedand a rotatably mounted drum having a substantially cylindrical perforated wall. and adapted to receive clothes to be dried, a casing enclosing said drum and cooperating therewith to define first and second spaced-apart chambers therebetween respectively:disposed adjacent to the top andadjacent to the bottom of said-casing, meansrfor rotatingsaid drum in orderto tumble the contained clothes and to produce circulation of a current of air from said first chamber through said drum into contact with the contained clothes and thence into said second chamber and back into 16? conduit-disposed exteriorly of'said casing and normallyzsupplied with cool water under gauge pressure, a bafiie disposed within said casing below the bottom of said drum and above said second chamber, a target disposed within said second chamber below said bafile, said casing having anopening formed therein adjacent to said second chamber,'a nozzle connected to said inlet conduit and disposed'exteriorly of said casing and directedtoward said opening at said target andarranged to project a streamof said cool water through an air gap and thence through.

said opening onto said target, said target being arranged to break up saidstream of said cool water into a finely divided spray of said cool water in said second chamber having'upwardly and" downwardly directed portions so'that said current of air is cooled 'and'scrubbed as it is passed therethrough, said bafiie redirecting said upwardly directed portion of said spray of said cool water downwardly toward the bottom of said casing, ,valve means for selectively controlling the supplyof said cool water from said inlet conduit to said'nozzle, the'airv gap between said nozzle and said opening being arranged to supply air via said nozzle intosaid inlet conduit in the event of the abnormal condition of a subatmospheric pressure therein so as positively to prevent back-siphoning ofwater from said second chamber: into said inlet conduit, and a drain conduit communicating between the lower portion of said second chamber and the exterior of said casing.

2. In :a. clothes drying machine including a substantiallyhorizontally disposed and rotatably mounted drum having'a substantially cylindrical perforated walland adapted to receive clothes to be dried, a casing enclosing said drumrand cooperating therewith to define first and second spaced-apart chambers therebetween respectively disposedadjacent to the top and adjacent to the bottom of. said casing, means for rotating said drum in order to tumble the contained clothes andv to produce'circulationiof a current of air from said first chamber through said drum into contact with the contained clothes and thence into said second chamber and backinto said first chamber, and meansfor heatingsaid current of air as it is passed through. said first chamber; the combination comprising an inlet conduit disposed exteriorlyof said casingand normally suppliedwith cool water under gauge pressure, said casing havinganopening in a wall thereof adjacent to said second chamber, a fixture carried by said wall and covering said opening, a target carried by said-fixture and disposed within said second chamber, a nozzle carried by said fixture and disposed exteriorly of said Wall, said nozzle being connected to said inlet conduit and directed. toward said opening at said target and arranged to project a stream of said'cool water through an air gap and thence through said opening onto said target, said target being arranged to break up said stream of said 0001 water into upwardly and downwardly directed finely divided sprays of said cool water in said second chamber so that said current of air is cooled and scrubbed as it is passed therethrough, a drain pan located below said fixture, valve means for selectively controllingthe supply of said cool wa- I terlrom said inlet conduit to said nozzle, the air gap between said nozzle and said opening being arranged to supply air via said nozzle into said inlet conduit in the event of the abnormal condition .of a subatmospheric pressure therein so as positively to prevent back-siphoning of water from said second chamber into said inlet conduit, and a drain conduit communicating with said drain pan and the exterior of said casing.

3. The clothes drying machine combination set forth in claim 2, and further comprising a flow regulator arranged in said inlet conduit and preceding said nozzle for maintaining substantially constant the quantity of said cool water delivered to said nozzle per unit time notwithstanding variations in the gauge pressure of said cool water in said inlet conduit.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date Stoddard July 29, 1941 Pugh Oct. 19, 1948 Pugh Nov. 16, 1948 Oliver Dec. 26, 1950 Briggs May 8, 1951 Woodrufl Feb. 5, 1952 Constantine Aug. 19, 1952 Hammell et a1. July '7, 1953

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2864175 *18 Oct 195716 Dec 1958Gen ElectricSpray condenser for clothes dryers and combination washer-dryers
US7627960 *30 Jun 20038 Dec 2009General Electric CompanyClothes dryer drum projections
US7644514 *23 Dec 200412 Jan 2010Bsh Bosch Und Siemens Hausgeraete GmbhClothes dryer
US7658015 *15 May 20079 Feb 2010Gardell Christopher MClothes drying device
US7980002 *28 Jan 201019 Jul 2011Röhren-und Pumpenwerk Bauer Gesellschaft mbHRotary drum for the aerobic heating of pourable solids
US8132339 *30 Jul 200813 Mar 2012Lg Electronics Inc.Cloth treating apparatus
US8209881 *23 Jun 20093 Jul 2012Daewoo Electronics CorporationCondensation type dryer
US9027256 *1 Feb 201312 May 2015Lg Electronics Inc.Laundry lint filter cleaning machine
US20090151193 *30 Jul 200818 Jun 2009Lg Electronics Inc.Cloth treating apparatus
US20090320311 *23 Jun 200931 Dec 2009Daewoo Electronics CorporationCondensation type dryer
US20130219734 *1 Feb 201329 Aug 2013Youngsuk KimLaundry treating machine
DE1119218B *28 Nov 195514 Dec 1961Gen ElectricWaeschetrommeltrockner
Classifications
U.S. Classification34/75, 239/524, 261/115
International ClassificationD06F58/04
Cooperative ClassificationD06F58/04
European ClassificationD06F58/04