Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS20090018570 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 11/776,695
Publication date15 Jan 2009
Filing date12 Jul 2007
Priority date12 Jul 2007
Also published asUS8006535, US8640521, US20110264205
Publication number11776695, 776695, US 2009/0018570 A1, US 2009/018570 A1, US 20090018570 A1, US 20090018570A1, US 2009018570 A1, US 2009018570A1, US-A1-20090018570, US-A1-2009018570, US2009/0018570A1, US2009/018570A1, US20090018570 A1, US20090018570A1, US2009018570 A1, US2009018570A1
InventorsGiovanni Righini, Giovanni Bergamasco, Gaetano Burriesci
Original AssigneeSorin Biomedica Cardio S.R.L.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Expandable prosthetic valve crimping device
US 20090018570 A1
Abstract
A device for crimping an implantable device or a part thereof between a radially expanded condition and a radially contracted condition, includes first and second annular bodies arranged about a common axis, and a ring-like array of linear crimping elements having respective opposite ends linked to the first and second annular bodies, respectively. These annular bodies are relatively rotatable around the common axis between a first position, wherein the annular array of crimping elements define a wider orifice for receiving a device to be crimped, and a second position, wherein the annular array of crimping elements define a narrower orifice.
Images(7)
Previous page
Next page
Claims(23)
1. A device for crimping an expandable prosthetic heart valve, the device comprising:
a first annular body and a second annular body arranged for relative rotation generally about an axis; and
an array of linear crimping elements having first ends coupled to the first annular body and second ends coupled to the second annular body;
wherein the first body and the second body are configured to rotate about the axis between a first position, wherein the crimping elements define a first diameter orifice and a second position, wherein the crimping elements define a second diameter orifice.
2. The device of claim 1 further including a brake member selectively actuatable to prevent the relative angular rotation of the first and second annular bodies.
3. The device of claim 1, wherein the crimping elements include a plurality of flexible elements extending in a generally serpentine pattern between the first and second annular bodies, wherein the pattern includes portions of the flexible elements extending between the first and the second annular bodies to define the crimping elements.
4. The device of claim 3, wherein the flexible elements are elastic to allow for the variation of the distance of the respective opposite ends of the crimping elements in the first and the second position.
5. The device of claim 3, wherein the flexible elements are substantially unextendable elements, whereby the crimping elements are generally loose in the first position and become increasingly taut as the first and second annular bodies move towards the second position.
6. The device of claim 1 further including a peripheral rim fixed to the second annular body and extending around the first annular body, such that the first and the second annular bodies are generally centered about the axis.
7. The device of claim 6 further including:
a third annular body, wherein the first annular body is interposed between the second and the third annular bodies, the first annular body adapted for relative rotation with respect to the second and the third annular bodies, and
a second array of linear crimping elements provided between the first annular body and either of the second and third annular bodies.
8. The device of claim 7 further including at least one flexible member extending in a generally serpentine pattern, wherein the pattern includes portions of the flexible member extending between the second and the third annular bodies through the first annular body to define the arrays of linear crimping elements.
9. A kit for replacement of a diseased heart valve, the kit comprising a crimping tool, a heart valve prosthesis deployment tool or portion thereof, an expandable heart valve prosthesis, in which the crimping tool is sized and dimensioned to reduce the size of the heart valve prosthesis to aid in placement of the prosthesis on the heart valve prosthesis deployment tool.
10. The kit of claim 9 further comprising a diseased heart valve leaflet removal tool or portion thereof and a delivery system for guiding the deployment tool and the removal tool into the interior of a heart.
11. The kit of claim 9 further comprising a storage container sized and dimensioned to store the heart valve prosthesis in an expanded state.
12. The kit of claim 11 further comprising a solution for maintaining the integrity of the heart valve prosthesis prior to implantation.
13. The kit of claim 9, wherein the crimping tool is configured for uniformly compressing the heart valve prosthesis from an expanded state into a contracted state.
14. The kit of claim 9, wherein the crimping tool compresses the heart valve prosthesis without damaging leaflets on the heart valve prosthesis.
15. The kit of claim 10, wherein the crimping tool is sized and dimensioned to compress the heart valve prosthesis to obtain a compressed heart valve prosthesis, and to deliver the compressed heart valve prosthesis onto the delivery system.
16. The kit of claim 9, wherein the crimping tool is variably adjustable to compress and expand the heart valve prosthesis.
17. The kit of claim 9, wherein the deployment tool comprises a guide wire.
18. The kit of claim 9, wherein the deployment tool is reversibly lockable.
19. A device for crimping an expandable prosthetic heart valve comprising a first annular body and a second annular body arranged for relative rotation generally about an axis and an array of linear crimping elements defining an opening having a diameter, wherein rotation of the first body with respect to the second body about the axis causes a change in the diameter.
20. The device of claim 19 further comprising a prosthetic heart valve having an end portion generally disposed within the orifice.
21. A device for crimping a heart valve prosthesis onto a delivery system, said device comprising multiple crimping modules, each respective one of said crimping modules being located in distinct crimping planes from each other.
22. The device of claim 21 in which said crimping planes lie parallel to each other.
23. The device of claim 21 in which said crimping planes lie in a non-parallel relationship to each other.
Description
    TECHNICAL FIELD
  • [0001]
    The present invention relates to crimping devices for use with implantable devices, such as prosthetic heart valves.
  • BACKGROUND
  • [0002]
    A wide variety of crimping devices have been developed for crimping stents (e.g., angioplasty stents) onto or within their associated delivery catheters. The term “crimping” is currently used to denote the action of radially contracting an implantable device or a part thereof. A stent for implantation in a body vessel often includes an apertured tubular body that is generally elongated in shape. In other words, the axial length of the stent is larger than, and usually a multiple of, the radial dimension, both in the radially unexpanded and the radially expanded condition of the stent. Many crimping devices known in the art rely on the elongated shape of the stent for proper operation.
  • [0003]
    Often implantable devices must be crimped to be coupled to implements or tools for conveying the device to the implantation site. The crimping action may involve the entire implantable device or only a portion thereof having an annular shape of reduced length (e.g., an axial length that is smaller than a diameter in an expanded condition). Crimping devices known in the art are not ideal for crimping “short” implantable devices, which do not have an axial length much greater than a diameter. These devices may slide or kink sideways with respect to the plane where the crimping action occurs. Likewise, these devices may become unevenly deformed during crimping and thus may be off-center with respect to the desired crimping axis.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0004]
    FIG. 1 is a general perspective view of a crimping device as described herein.
  • [0005]
    FIG. 2 is an exploded view showing the basic elements of a device as described herein.
  • [0006]
    FIGS. 3 a and 3 b are schematic representations of the operating principle of a device as described herein.
  • [0007]
    FIGS. 4 a-4 d show a sequence of steps in assembling a device as described herein.
  • [0008]
    FIGS. 5 and 6 show an alternative embodiment of a crimping device as described herein.
  • [0009]
    While the invention is amenable to various modifications and alternative forms, specific embodiments have been shown by way of example in the drawings and are described in detail below. The intention, however, is not to limit the invention to the particular embodiments described. On the contrary, the invention is intended to cover all modifications, equivalents, and alternatives falling within the scope of the invention as defined by the appended claims.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • [0010]
    FIG. 1 shows a crimping device adapted for use in crimping implantable devices such as, for example, prosthetic heart valves for minimally-invasive (e.g., “sutureless”) or percutaneous implantation, according to one embodiment of the present invention. One such exemplary device is disclosed in EP-A-1 690 515, which is incorporated herein by reference. Such a prosthetic heart valve includes an armature with two annular end sections. These annular end sections are “short” elements, having an axial length that is smaller and generally several times smaller than a diameter in the expanded configuration. In some embodiments, the axial length is a submultiple (e.g., ⅕) of the diameter in the expanded configuration. Other exemplary expandable prosthetic heart valves are shown and described in U.S. Publication 2006/0178740 and U.S. Publication 2005/0197695, both of which are incorporated herein by reference.
  • [0011]
    The device illustrated in FIG. 1 is a multiple crimping tool including a first crimping device 10 adapted for crimping for example, the “inflow” annular end portion R1 of a valve as described in EP-1 690 515, and two “twin” crimping devices 101, 102 adapted for crimping (possibly simultaneously) for example, the “outflow” annular end portion R2 of the same valve. For ease of illustration, FIG. 1 shows only the end portions R1 and R2 of the valve in question.
  • [0012]
    Arranging two units 101, 102 side-by-side for crimping the outflow portion R2 of the valve may be advantageous. In valves such as those disclosed in EP-A-1 690 515, for example, the inflow portion R1 of the valve carries a tubular pericardium structure comprising the prosthetic leaflets of the valve. This structure provides a certain axial stability to the inflow portion R1 of the valve during crimping. Conversely, the outflow portion R2 is comprised essentially of only the valve armature, so thus may benefit from a crimping action somewhat distributed over its length. Each of the devices 10, 101, and 102 is mounted (e.g., using screws, not visible in the drawing) on a solid base B. The devices 10, 101, 102, the base B, and any related component are comprised of a material suitable for medical use (e.g., polysulfone or Delrin™) and adapted to be easily sterilized.
  • [0013]
    As shown in FIG. 1, the three devices 10, 101, and 102 are substantially identical. Thus, while the description that follows specifically refer to the device 10, it should be understood that this description also applies to the devices 101 and 102. The device shown in FIG. 1 may be used during an implantation procedure (i.e., in the operational theatre) to crimp, for example, a prosthetic valve just extracted from its sterile delivery package onto the tool or implement (e.g., a catheter) used for implanting the valve into a patient's body.
  • [0014]
    According to various embodiments, the device or part subject to crimping is self-expandable. Such a device or part may be constructed of, for example, a superelastic material (e.g., Nitinol), which is crimped from a radially-expanded, “relaxed” condition towards a radially-contracted, “constrained” condition against the elastic force of the device or part. According to other embodiments, the device or part subject to crimping is constructed from a plastically deformable material (e.g., stainless steel), which is plastically deformed from a radially-expanded condition towards a radially-contracted condition, for example, for crimping onto an expandable member such as an inflatable balloon located at or near a distal end of an insertion catheter.
  • [0015]
    As shown in the exploded view of FIG. 2, each of the devices 10, 101, 102 (hereinafter “the device 10”) includes two annular bodies 10 a, 10 b arranged for relative rotation about a common axis X10. A third annular body 10 c includes an integral outer circular rim 12 adapted to abut against the outer periphery of the body 10 b when the two bodies 10 b, 10 c are connected to each other via screws 13, with the body 10 a interposed therebetween.
  • [0016]
    The “axial” length (i.e., the length in the direction of the axis X10) and the inner diameter of the rim 12 are selected relative to the thickness and outer diameter of the body 10 a in order to ensure radial and axial containment of the body 10 a between the two bodies 10 b and 10 c, while allowing relative rotation of the two bodies 10 a, 10 b about the axis X10. This relative rotation can be produced by moving a radial arm 16 connected to the body 10 a and extending through a slit 12 a provided over a given angular length of the rim 12. Either or both of the bodies 10 b and 10 c are fixed to the base B. Consequently, the arm 16 can be used as an actuating lever to controllably rotate the body 10 a with respect to the body 10 b.
  • [0017]
    A screw member or brake member 20 inserted into a threaded radial hole in the rim 12 selectively acts as a brake to fix the body 10 a at a given position with respect to the body 10 b. Specifically, the brake member 20 is adapted to be loosened and thus radially displaced away from the body 10 a to permit free rotation of the body 10 a with respect to the bodies 10 b and 10 c. Conversely, when tightened into the threaded opening, the member 20 advances towards the body 10 a to engage the outer periphery thereof and thus prevent rotation of the body 10 a around the axis X10.
  • [0018]
    A screw 13 may be used to couple the bodies 10 b and 10 c to each other. By removing the screws 13, the body 10 a can thus be accessed to remove and replace a linear, wire-like element 26 (e.g., a wire, a suture, a string, a tether, etc.) extending between the bodies 10 a and 10 b. The wire-like element 26 may include a plurality of crimping elements 24, generally in the form of wire-like formations. The crimping elements 24 are interposed between the two bodies 10 a and 10 b with each element 24 having a first portion 24 a coupled or linked to the body 10 a and a second portion 24 b linked to the body 10 b. As used herein, “linked” is intended to encompass, in addition to a fixed connection, any form of looser association causing the ends 24 a, 24 b of the elements 24 to follow the respective body 10 a, 10 b in the relative rotation movement about the axis X10.
  • [0019]
    In various exemplary embodiments, the body 10 b maintains a fixed position with respect to the base B, while the body 10 a is selectively and controllably rotated (clockwise, in the example shown) by acting on the “lever” 16. Thus, the ends 24 b of the elements 24 will generally retain a fixed or substantially fixed position while the ends 24 a will follow the rotation of the body 10 a.
  • [0020]
    As schematically shown in FIGS. 3 a and 3 b, operation of the device 10 relies on the relative rotation of the bodies 10 a, 10 b, which causes displacement of the elements 24 between a first, “outer” position wherein the ends 24 a, 24 b of each element jointly define a chordal (i.e., off-center) trajectory with respect to the axis X10, and a second, “inner” position wherein, due to the relative rotation movement of the bodies 10 a, 10 b, the ends 24 a, 24 b of each element come to define a substantially diametrical trajectory with respect to the axis X10. This substantially diametrical trajectory extends in the vicinity of the axis X10, but does not cross the axis X10. This substantially diametrical trajectory thus corresponds to a trajectory (much) nearer to the axis X10 than the chordal trajectory.
  • [0021]
    As a result of a movement between the outer, chordal position shown in FIG. 3 a and the inner, substantially diametrical position shown in FIG. 3 b, the distance between the ends 24 a, 24 b of each element 24 increases. This increase in length can be accommodated in at least three ways, namely: by using elements 24 that are extendable (e.g., elastic), by allowing either or both ends of the elements 24 to be capable of at least slightly sliding with respect to the bodies 10 a, 10 b, and/or by having the ends 24 a, 24 b of the elements remain substantially fixed with respect to the bodies 10 a, 10 b, with the elements 24 (e.g., in the forms of wire-like bodies) extending loosely between the bodies 10 a, 10 b in the inner chordal position of FIG. 3 a while becoming increasingly taut when approaching the inner substantially diametrical position of FIG. 3 b.
  • [0022]
    The elements 24 comprise an annular array of elements distributed around the axis X10, and the overall result obtainable in passing from the condition illustrated in FIG. 3 a to the condition illustrated in FIG. 3 b is similar to operation of an obturator in a camera. In other words, in the outer, chordal position of FIG. 3 a, the elements 24 jointly define a wider, expanded orifice 30 adapted to receive any of the annular end portions (e.g., the inflow portion R1) of the prosthetic device to be crimped, and in the inner, substantially diametrical position of FIG. 3 b, the elements 24 jointly define a narrower orifice 30. In this manner, the annular element (e.g., the inflow portion R1), located within the orifice 30 in the position shown in FIG. 3 a, is radially contracted (and thus “crimped”) by the joint action of the elements 24 passing from the position of FIG. 3 a to the position of FIG. 3 b.
  • [0023]
    As described above, an exemplary embodiment provides for the elements 24 being generally loose when in the outer chordal position of FIG. 3 b. The central orifice 30 defined therebetween will thus be a “soft” orifice adapted to resiliently receive the annular element R1 or R2, while allowing for a certain degree of axial displacement with respect to the central axis X10. Also, being generally loose, the elements 24 will accommodate any irregularities of the outer contour of the element R1 or R2, which may be present if, for example, the element 24 is an apertured, mesh-like body. The elements 24 approaching the inner, substantially diametrical position and becoming increasingly taut will thus have the joint effect of crimping the element R1, R2 while increasingly centering the element R1, R2 about the axis X10 by means of an “isostatic” action.
  • [0024]
    According to various embodiments, the elements 24 are comprised of subsequent sections of one (or more) wire-like members 26 for example, Dacron™ wire which is threaded in a serpentine pattern between the two bodies 10 a, 10 b. As shown in FIG. 4 a, by way of example, such a serpentine pattern or trajectory of the wire 26 includes, starting from one end 26 a of the wire-like element 26 fixed (e.g., by means of a knot or a stitch) to the body 10 a, a first portion extending from the body 10 a to the body 10 b and comprising a first one of the elements 24 having a first end 24 a fixed to the body 10 a and the opposite end 24 b extending through a hole in (and thus linked to) the body 10 b, a short portion 26 b extending over the surface of the body 10 b opposite the body 10 a towards another through hole provided in the body 10 b, a second portion extending from the body 10 b back to the body 10 a and comprising a second one of the elements 24 having an end 24 b extending through a hole in (and thus linked to) the body 10 b and the opposite end 24 a extending through a hole in (and thus linked to) the body 10 a, another short portion 26 c extending over the surface of the body 10 a opposite the body 10 b towards another through hole provided in the body 10 a, a third portion extending again from the body 10 a to the body 10 b and comprising a third one of the elements 24 having an end 24 a extending through a hole in (and thus linked to) the body 10 a and the opposite end 24 b extending through a hole in (and thus linked to) the body 10 b, another short portion 26 d extending over the surface of the body 10 b opposite the body 10 a towards another through hole provided in the body 10 b, and so on. This continues until the “other” end (i.e., the end opposite to the 26 a) of the wire-like element 26 is fixed to either of the bodies 10 a and 10 b. While the holes for the wire 26 in the bodies 10 a, 10 b will typically constitute two circular crown patterns of equally spaced holes, this is not required. Alternatively, these holes may not be equally angularly spaced and/or may be arranged over plural circular trajectories centered around the axis X10.
  • [0025]
    As shown in FIGS. 4 a-4 d, once the serpentine pattern of the wire 26 is completed, the two bodies 10 a, 10 b may be rotated, one with respect to the other, about the common axis X10. This rotational movement first causes the portions of the wire element(s) 26 extending between the two bodies 10 a, 10 b to become skew with respect to the axis X10 thus notionally defining an hourglass-like geometrical surface substantially similar to a rotation hyperboloid. As shown by the sequence of FIGS. 4 a-4 d, the “height” of such a hyperboloid (i.e., the distance between the two bodies 10 a, 10 b) gradually decreases as the rotation movement advances.
  • [0026]
    When the two bodies 10 a, 10 b are placed one against each other as shown in FIG. 4 d, with the wire-like element 26 lying therebetween, the elements 24 are arranged as depicted in FIG. 3 a (i.e., the elements 24 define a wider, expanded orifice 30). Of course, the sequence depicted in FIGS. 4 a-4 d is just one exemplary way of obtaining an “obturator-like” arrangement of the elements 24. The arrangement described herein allows the device 10 to be relatively simple and inexpensive. It also allows the device 10 to be a disposable implement for one-time use in the operational theatre to crimp an implantable device.
  • [0027]
    The brake member 20 is configured to stop the crimping action at any desired position, including intermediate positions. This feature may be useful, for instance, in the multiple crimping arrangement illustrated in FIG. 1. First, the operator can crimp a first of annular end portions (e.g., the inflow portion R1). Then, with the inflow portion R1 crimped and safely retained within the device 10 and secured by the respective brake member 20, the operator can crimp the opposite outflow portion R2, using the twin devices 101 and 102. The sequence of operations may also be reversed, such that the outflow portion R2 is crimped before the inflow portion R1. FIG. 1 shows an exemplary situation wherein the inflow end portion R1 has been crimped using the device 10, and the outflow end portion R2 is in the process of being crimped by using the twin devices 101 and 102. This occurs while the device 10 is “locked” by the brake member 20. The operator is thus in a position to fully concentrate on the crimping operation of the outflow portion R2.
  • [0028]
    FIG. 5 shows an alternative embodiment where the “twin” devices 101, 102 are incorporated to a single, integrated structure. Direct comparison of FIG. 5 to FIG. 2 shows that the integrated structure of FIG. 5 again includes the annular bodies 10 a, 10 b, 10 c, with the body 10 a interposed between the bodies 10 b, 10 c and capable of relative movement with respect to the bodies 10 b, 10 c. The body 10 a can thus be rotated with respect to the bodies 10 b and 10 c (which are fixed to each other via the screws 13), as a result of actuation of the lever 16. While the embodiment of FIG. 2 includes a body 10 c that is unperforated (except for the holes provided for the screws 13), in the embodiment of FIG. 5, the body 10 c includes a “crown” of holes essentially similar to that provided in the body 10 b.
  • [0029]
    In the embodiment of FIG. 5, the wire 26 is again imparted a serpentine pattern or trajectory starting, for example, from one end fixed to the body 10 b and including: a first portion extending from the body 10 b through a hole in the body 10 a up to the body 10 c, a short portion extending over the surface of the body 10 c opposite the body 10 a towards another through hole provided in the body 10 c, a second portion extending from the body 10 c through a hole in the body 10 a back to the body 10 b, another short portion extending over the surface of the body 10 b opposite the body 10 a towards another through hole provided in the body 10 b, a third portion extending again from the body 10 b through a hole in the body 10 a up to the body 10 c, another short portion extending over the surface of the body 10 c opposite the body 10 a towards another through hole provided in the body 10 b, and so on. This continues until the “other” end of the wire-like element 26 is fixed to any of the bodies 10 a, 10 b or 10 c.
  • [0030]
    As schematically shown in FIG. 6 (which generally corresponds to FIG. 4 c), once the serpentine pattern of the wire 26 is completed, the body 10 a can be rotated with respect to the bodies 10 b, and 10 c about the common axis X10. As shown, this rotational movement first causes the portions of the wire element(s) 26 extending on either side of the body 10 a towards the two bodies 10 b and 10 c to become skew with respect to the axis X10 thus notionally defining on either side of the body 10 a hourglass-like geometrical surfaces substantially similar to a rotation hyperboloid. The “height” of such hyperboloids (i.e. the distance between the body 10 a and either of the bodies 10 b, 10 c) gradually decreases as the rotation movement advances.
  • [0031]
    When the two bodies 10 b, 10 c are placed against the body 10 a with the wire-like element 26 lying therebetween, the elements 24 are positioned on both sides of the body 10 a in an “obturator-like” arrangement or array as shown in FIG. 3 a. These arrays of elements 24 are arranged side-by-side (e.g., at an axial distance of a few millimeters or less) and can thus jointly co-operate in crimping, for example, the outflow portion R2 of a valve as schematically shown in FIG. 1. These two “twin” arrays of elements 24 arranged side-by-side can be operated by acting on the (single) lever 16 of the body 10 a and can be locked at any desired crimping position under the action of the brake member 20, which can be selectively operated (e.g., tightened or loosened) to prevent or permit rotation of the body 10 a with respect to the bodies 10 b and 10 c.
  • [0032]
    Regardless of the embodiment selected, the wire-like characteristic of the elements 24 may be advantageous, as these wire-like elements may easily adapt to an irregular (e.g., V-shaped) outer surface of the device/part to be crimped. Additionally, the wire-like characteristic of the elements 24 may be advantageous in that these elements do not prevent penetration of a sheath-like or cap-like element possibly slid over the crimped device or part to constrain it in the crimped position.
  • [0033]
    As an alternative to the wire-like configuration, alternative embodiments may include elements 24 in the form of blade-like elements of members (which may be flexible) possibly extending along helical trajectories between the two bodies 10 a, 10 b. These blade-like elements may be advantageous in more extensively countering any tendency of the device/part being crimped to becoming undesirably kinked during crimping. Also, while in the exemplary embodiments described and shown herein, the bodies 10 a, 10 b, and 10 c are in the form of closed annular bodies, any of them can take the form of an open body (e.g., a sort of “split” ring). By way of example, a flexible element or member can be a wire-like member, a wire, a string, a thread made of natural or synthetic materials, a plastic, a metal, and the like.
  • [0034]
    In yet another variant of the invention, a device for crimping a heart valve prosthesis onto a delivery system is also provided. Such a device may include multiple crimping modules as shown in FIG. 1. Each respective one of the crimping modules is located in a distinct crimping plane one from another. It is appreciated that one crimping module (e.g., 10) can act on the inflow portion of the device, while a second crimping module (e.g. 101, 102) can act, simultaneously or at a different point in time, on the outflow portion of the device. Similarly, each of the modules can be mechanically connected (as shown e.g. in FIGS. 5 and 6) so that a first module acts on a first portion of the device, while at a predetermined moment in time the other one or more modules act on another portion of the device. By way of further example, three, four, five or more crimping modules act on different portions of the device to crimp it on different sections of the delivery system. In another variant, the crimping planes lie parallel to each other (e.g., in a stacked arrangement). In another variant, the crimping planes intersect or lie in a non-parallel relationship to each other.
  • [0035]
    Consequently, without prejudice to the underlying principles of the invention, details and embodiments may vary, even significantly, with respect to what has been described and illustrated by way of example only, without departing from the scope of the invention as defined by the annexed claims. Likewise, various modifications and additions can be made to the exemplary embodiments discussed without departing from the scope of the present invention. For example, while the embodiments described above refer to particular features, the scope of this invention also includes embodiments having different combinations of features and embodiments that do not include all of the described features. Accordingly, the scope of the present invention is intended to embrace all such alternatives, modifications, and variations as fall within the scope of the claims, together with all equivalents thereof.
Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3363442 *25 May 196516 Jan 1968North American Aviation IncTube tapering device
US5042161 *7 Oct 198527 Aug 1991Joseph HodgeIntravascular sizing method and apparatus
US5360014 *10 Nov 19931 Nov 1994Carbomedics, Inc.Sizing apparatus for heart valve with supra annular suture ring
US5489296 *17 Dec 19936 Feb 1996AutogenicsHeart valve measurement tool
US5522884 *19 Feb 19934 Jun 1996Medtronic, Inc.Holder for adjustable mitral & tricuspid annuloplasty rings
US5560487 *29 Jul 19941 Oct 1996Carbomedics, Inc.Holder and packaging for bioprosthetic heart valve
US5669919 *16 Aug 199623 Sep 1997Medtronic, Inc.Annuloplasty system
US5672169 *10 Apr 199630 Sep 1997Medtronic, Inc.Stent mounting device
US5693066 *21 Dec 19952 Dec 1997Medtronic, Inc.Stent mounting and transfer device and method
US5698307 *3 May 199516 Dec 1997Fabrite Laminating Corp.Quadlaminate fabric for surgical gowns and drapes
US5776187 *5 Aug 19967 Jul 1998St. Jude Medical, Inc.Combined holder tool and rotator for a prosthetic heart valve
US5800531 *30 Sep 19961 Sep 1998Baxter International Inc.Bioprosthetic heart valve implantation device
US5810873 *15 Jul 199722 Sep 1998Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc.Stent crimping tool and method of use
US5814096 *24 Oct 199729 Sep 1998Baxter International Inc.Sizing obturator for prosthetic aortic valves
US5885228 *8 May 199623 Mar 1999Heartport, Inc.Valve sizer and method of use
US5947993 *18 Sep 19987 Sep 1999Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc.Stent crimping tool and method of use
US5951540 *22 Oct 199814 Sep 1999Medtronic, Inc.Device and method for mounting stents
US5972016 *22 Apr 199726 Oct 1999Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc.Stent crimping device and method of use
US6019739 *18 Jun 19981 Feb 2000Baxter International Inc.Minimally invasive valve annulus sizer
US6024737 *25 Feb 199815 Feb 2000Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc.Stent crimping device
US6051002 *9 Oct 199818 Apr 2000Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc.Stent crimping device and method of use
US6063102 *28 Oct 199816 May 2000Advanced Cardivascular Systems, Inc.Stent crimping device and method of use
US6110200 *25 Sep 199829 Aug 2000St. Jude Medical, Inc.Adjustable sizing apparatus
US6202272 *26 Feb 199820 Mar 2001Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc.Hand-held stent crimping device
US6277110 *18 Oct 199921 Aug 2001Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc.Method of crimping an intravascular stent onto a balloon catheter
US6309383 *20 Jan 200030 Oct 2001Isostent, Inc.Stent crimper apparatus with radiation shied
US6350281 *14 Sep 199926 Feb 2002Edwards Lifesciences Corp.Methods and apparatus for measuring valve annuluses during heart valve-replacement surgery
US6352547 *22 Sep 19995 Mar 2002Scimed Life Systems, Inc.Stent crimping system
US6387117 *22 Sep 199914 May 2002Scimed Life Systems, Inc.Stent crimping system
US6402780 *6 May 199911 Jun 2002Cardiovascular Technologies, L.L.C.Means and method of replacing a heart valve in a minimally invasive manner
US6454799 *6 Apr 200024 Sep 2002Edwards Lifesciences CorporationMinimally-invasive heart valves and methods of use
US6481262 *20 Jun 200119 Nov 2002Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc.Stent crimping tool
US6506201 *12 Dec 200014 Jan 2003Scimed Life Systems, Inc.Balloon catheter with stent securement means
US6510722 *10 May 200028 Jan 2003Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc.Stent crimping tool for producing a grooved crimp
US6598307 *13 Aug 200129 Jul 2003Jack W. LoveDevice and method for assessing the geometry of a heart valve
US6629350 *8 Jun 20017 Oct 2003Tom MotsenbockerStent crimping apparatus and method
US6678962 *17 Nov 200020 Jan 2004Cardiomend LlcDevice and method for assessing the geometry of a heart valve
US6726713 *7 Aug 200127 Apr 2004Biotronik Mess- Und Therapiegeraete Gmbh & Co. Ingenieurbuero BerlinMethod and device for crimping a stent
US6730118 *11 Oct 20024 May 2004Percutaneous Valve Technologies, Inc.Implantable prosthetic valve
US6769161 *22 Sep 19993 Aug 2004Scimed Life Systems, Inc.Radial stent crimper
US6846324 *22 Jan 200225 Jan 2005Edwards Lifesciences CorporationCombination anatomical orifice sizer and heart valve
US6915560 *23 May 200312 Jul 2005Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc.Apparatus for contracting, loading or crimping self-expanding and balloon expandable stent devices
US6968607 *21 Jul 200329 Nov 2005Tom MotsenbockerStent crimping method
US6981982 *25 Feb 20023 Jan 2006Gore Enterprise Holdings, Inc.Method of producing low profile stent and graft combination
US6988881 *26 Mar 200224 Jan 2006Machine Solutions, Inc.Balloon folding technology
US6996924 *30 Jun 200414 Feb 2006Akeva L.L.C.Rear sole structure for athletic shoe
US7007396 *29 May 20037 Mar 2006Plc Medical Systems, Inc.Replacement heart valve sizing device
US7021114 *16 Apr 20044 Apr 2006Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc.Stent crimper
US7069794 *10 Nov 20044 Jul 2006Machine Solutions, Inc.Radial expansion force measurement technology
US7258698 *17 Oct 200321 Aug 2007Medtronic, Inc.Prosthetic heart valve sizer assembly with flexible sizer body
US7338484 *15 May 20034 Mar 2008St. Jude Medical, Inc.Aortic heart valve prosthesis sizer and marker
US7357814 *18 May 200515 Apr 2008Shlomo GabbayMethod of determining size of cardiac prosthesis
US7367984 *7 May 20036 May 2008Medtronic, Inc.Methods and apparatus for sizing fresh donor heart valves
US7427291 *7 Sep 200523 Sep 2008Viacor, Inc.Tissue annuloplasty band and apparatus and method for fashioning, sizing and implanting the same
US20010049558 *12 Jan 20016 Dec 2001Liddicoat John R.Tissue annuloplasty band and apparatus and method for fashioning, sizing and implanting the same
US20020035390 *7 Aug 200121 Mar 2002Max SchaldachMethod and device for crimping a stent
US20020042651 *29 Jun 200111 Apr 2002Liddicoat John R.Method and apparatus for performing a procedure on a cardiac valve
US20020129820 *16 Oct 200119 Sep 2002Medtronic, IncAnnuloplasty band and method
US20020198594 *28 Jun 200226 Dec 2002Stefan SchreckMinimally-invasive heart valves and methods of use
US20030114913 *11 Oct 200219 Jun 2003Benjamin SpenserImplantable prosthetic valve
US20030125805 *25 Apr 20023 Jul 2003Medtronic, Inc.Heart valve system
US20030192134 *20 Dec 200216 Oct 2003L'orealComposition for the oxidation dyeing of keratin fibres, comprising a polyoxyalkylenated carboxylic acid ether, an associative polymer and an unsaturated fatty alcohol
US20030192164 *23 May 200316 Oct 2003Scimed Life Systems, Inc.Method and apparatus for contracting, loading or crimping self-expanding and balloon expandable stent devices
US20040039436 *8 Aug 200326 Feb 2004Benjamin SpenserImplantable prosthetic valve
US20040123437 *26 Dec 20021 Jul 2004Arkady KokishAssembly for crimping an intraluminal device and method of use
US20040193259 *25 Mar 200330 Sep 2004Shlomo GabbaySizing apparatus for cardiac prostheses and method of using same
US20040225356 *9 May 200311 Nov 2004Frater Robert W.Flexible heart valve
US20050166389 *29 Jan 20044 Aug 2005Scimed Life Systems, Inc.Apparatuses for crimping and loading of intraluminal medical devices
US20050197695 *25 Feb 20058 Sep 2005Sorin Biomedica Cardio S.R.L.Minimally-invasive cardiac-valve prosthesis
US20050197696 *22 Feb 20058 Sep 2005Gomez Duran Carlos M.Papilloplasty band and sizing device
US20050229670 *16 Apr 200420 Oct 2005Scimed Life Systems, Inc.Stent crimper
US20050234537 *16 Apr 200420 Oct 2005Scimed Life Systems, Inc.Stent crimper
US20050240256 *23 Jun 200527 Oct 2005Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc.Method and apparatus for contracting, loading or crimping self-expanding and balloon expandable stent devices
US20050267529 *31 Jan 20051 Dec 2005Heber CrockettDevices, systems and methods for tissue repair
US20050283232 *29 Aug 200522 Dec 2005Shlomo GabbaySizing apparatus
US20060004469 *16 Jun 20055 Jan 2006Justin SokelTissue prosthesis processing technology
US20060074486 *7 Sep 20056 Apr 2006Liddicoat John RTissue annuloplasty band and apparatus and method for fashioning, sizing and implanting the same
US20060178470 *3 Apr 200610 Aug 2006Martin MajoloCohesion-reduced binder production and use thereof in detachable assembly adhesives
US20060265855 *25 May 200530 Nov 2006Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc.Method and apparatus for reducing a stent
US20070027534 *24 Jul 20061 Feb 2007Bjarne BergheimMethods and systems for cardiac valve delivery
US20070056346 *8 Sep 200615 Mar 2007Benjamin SpenserProsthetic valve crimping device
US20070061009 *5 Oct 200615 Mar 2007Benjamin SpenserMethod of crimping a prosthetic valve
US20070100356 *13 Nov 20063 May 2007Evalve, Inc.Delivery device, systems and methods of use
US20070162113 *16 Feb 200712 Jul 2007Adam SharkawyProsthetic cardiac valves and systems and methods for implanting thereof
US20070173861 *10 Jan 200626 Jul 2007Mediguide Ltd.System and method for positioning an artificial heart valve at the position of a malfunctioning valve of a heart through a percutaneous route
US20080262603 *23 Apr 200723 Oct 2008Sorin Biomedica CardioProsthetic heart valve holder
US20100249661 *18 Mar 201030 Sep 2010Sorin Biomedica Cardio S.r.IUniversal Valve Annulus Sizing Device
US20100262043 *26 Mar 201014 Oct 2010Sorin Group Usa, Inc.Annuloplasty sizers for minimally invasive procedures
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US851239727 Apr 200920 Aug 2013Sorin Group Italia S.R.L.Prosthetic vascular conduit
US853537316 Jun 200817 Sep 2013Sorin Group Italia S.R.L.Minimally-invasive cardiac-valve prosthesis
US853966216 Jun 200824 Sep 2013Sorin Group Italia S.R.L.Cardiac-valve prosthesis
US854076830 Dec 201124 Sep 2013Sorin Group Italia S.R.L.Cardiac valve prosthesis
US856266326 Oct 201022 Oct 2013Medtronic Ventor Technologies Ltd.Devices and methods for loading a prosthesis onto a delivery system
US86405217 Jul 20114 Feb 2014Sorin Group Italia S.R.L.Expandable prosthetic valve crimping device
US868508428 Dec 20121 Apr 2014Sorin Group Italia S.R.L.Prosthetic vascular conduit and assembly method
US871520718 Mar 20106 May 2014Sorin Group Italia S.R.L.Universal valve annulus sizing device
US88083695 Oct 201019 Aug 2014Mayo Foundation For Medical Education And ResearchMinimally invasive aortic valve replacement
US883456316 Dec 200916 Sep 2014Sorin Group Italia S.R.L.Expandable prosthetic valve having anchoring appendages
US884066113 May 200923 Sep 2014Sorin Group Italia S.R.L.Atraumatic prosthetic heart valve prosthesis
US892049221 Aug 201330 Dec 2014Sorin Group Italia S.R.L.Cardiac valve prosthesis
US913831410 Feb 201422 Sep 2015Sorin Group Italia S.R.L.Prosthetic vascular conduit and assembly method
US914920716 Oct 20136 Oct 2015Sorin Group Usa, Inc.Annuloplasty sizers for minimally invasive procedures
US916183610 Feb 201220 Oct 2015Sorin Group Italia S.R.L.Sutureless anchoring device for cardiac valve prostheses
US919246921 Oct 201324 Nov 2015Medtronic Ventor Technologies Ltd.Devices and methods for loading a prosthesis onto a delivery system
US920523624 Dec 20128 Dec 2015Corvia Medical, Inc.Methods, systems, and devices for resizable intra-atrial shunts
US923299715 Mar 201312 Jan 2016Corvia Medical, Inc.Devices and methods for retrievable intra-atrial implants
US924801720 May 20112 Feb 2016Sorin Group Italia S.R.L.Support device for valve prostheses and corresponding kit
US927799528 Jan 20118 Mar 2016Corvia Medical, Inc.Devices and methods for reducing venous pressure
US928928910 Feb 201222 Mar 2016Sorin Group Italia S.R.L.Sutureless anchoring device for cardiac valve prostheses
US93083461 Feb 201312 Apr 2016Medtronic, Inc.Devices and methods for crimping and loading a collapsible device into a delivery system
US93085691 Feb 201312 Apr 2016Medtronic, Inc.Devices and methods for crimping and loading a medical device into a delivery system
US935837118 Jan 20137 Jun 2016Corvia Medical, Inc.Intra-atrial implants made of non-braided material
US945681224 Nov 20104 Oct 2016Corvia Medical, Inc.Devices for retrieving a prosthesis
US948631319 Nov 20148 Nov 2016Sorin Group Italia S.R.L.Cardiac valve prosthesis
US964299324 Dec 20129 May 2017Corvia Medical, Inc.Methods and devices for intra-atrial shunts having selectable flow rates
US96819682 Mar 200920 Jun 2017Venus Medtech (Hangzhou), Inc.Stent which is reduceable again in its diameter from an expanded state in a controlled manner
US97571072 Feb 201512 Sep 2017Corvia Medical, Inc.Methods and devices for intra-atrial shunts having adjustable sizes
US20080262603 *23 Apr 200723 Oct 2008Sorin Biomedica CardioProsthetic heart valve holder
US20100161045 *16 Dec 200924 Jun 2010Sorin Biomedica Cardio S.R.L.Expandable prosthetic valve having anchoring appendages
US20100249661 *18 Mar 201030 Sep 2010Sorin Biomedica Cardio S.r.IUniversal Valve Annulus Sizing Device
US20100262043 *26 Mar 201014 Oct 2010Sorin Group Usa, Inc.Annuloplasty sizers for minimally invasive procedures
US20110040366 *2 Mar 200917 Feb 2011Transcatheter Technologies GmbhStent which is reduceable again in its diameter from an expanded state in a controlled manner
US20110071624 *24 Nov 201024 Mar 2011Dc Devices, Inc.Devices for retrieving a prosthesis
US20110190874 *28 Jan 20114 Aug 2011Dc Devices, Inc.Devices and methods for reducing venous pressure
Classifications
U.S. Classification606/198, 606/1
International ClassificationA61B17/00, A61M29/00
Cooperative ClassificationA61F2/2415, B25B27/10, A61F2002/9522
European ClassificationB25B27/10, A61F2/24D2
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
24 Sep 2007ASAssignment
Owner name: SORIN BIOMEDICA CARDIO S.R.L., ITALY
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:RIGHINI, GIOVANNI;BERGAMASCO, GIOVANNI;BURRIESCI, GAETANO;REEL/FRAME:019866/0083;SIGNING DATES FROM 20070813 TO 20070907
Owner name: SORIN BIOMEDICA CARDIO S.R.L., ITALY
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:RIGHINI, GIOVANNI;BERGAMASCO, GIOVANNI;BURRIESCI, GAETANO;SIGNING DATES FROM 20070813 TO 20070907;REEL/FRAME:019866/0083
22 Jan 2015ASAssignment
Owner name: SORIN GROUP ITALIA S.R.L., ITALY
Free format text: MERGER;ASSIGNOR:SORIN BIOMEDICA CARDIO S.R.L.;REEL/FRAME:034787/0383
Effective date: 20121205
11 Feb 2015FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 4