Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS20080038578 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 11/877,274
Publication date14 Feb 2008
Filing date23 Oct 2007
Priority date16 Jan 2004
Also published asUS7285312, US20050158590, US20090098346
Publication number11877274, 877274, US 2008/0038578 A1, US 2008/038578 A1, US 20080038578 A1, US 20080038578A1, US 2008038578 A1, US 2008038578A1, US-A1-20080038578, US-A1-2008038578, US2008/0038578A1, US2008/038578A1, US20080038578 A1, US20080038578A1, US2008038578 A1, US2008038578A1
InventorsChien-Wei Li
Original AssigneeHoneywell International, Inc.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Atomic layer deposition for turbine components
US 20080038578 A1
Abstract
A method and superalloy component for depositing a layer of material onto gas turbine engine components by atomic layer deposition. A superalloy component may have a ceramic thermal barrier coating on at least a portion of its surface, comprising a superalloy substrate and a bonding coat; and aluminum oxide (Al2O3) layer may be deposited on top of an yttria-stabilized zirconia layer and form a bonding coat by atomic layer deposition. The yttria-stabilized zirconia layer may have a plurality of micron sized gaps extending from the top surface of the ceramic coating towards the substrate and defining a plurality of columns of the yttria-stabilized zirconia layer. Also, atomic layer deposition may be used to lay an aluminum oxide (Al2O3) layer over a tantalum oxide (Ta2O5) layer on a silicon-based substrate. Using atomic layer deposition to coat the gas turbine engine components permits conformal coating of the columnar surface to permit gap expansion and contraction without sintering of the columnar surface or spalling of the coating, and form an oxidation resistant bonding coat.
Images(5)
Previous page
Next page
Claims(19)
1. A superalloy component having a ceramic thermal barrier coating on at least a portion of its surface, comprising:
a superalloy substrate;
a ceramic thermal barrier coating overlying the superalloy substrate;
a first coating layer overlying the ceramic thermal barrier coating;
the first coating layer having a thickness from about 5 nm to 5000 nm microns;
the ceramic thermal barrier coating having a plurality of gaps extending from the top surface of the ceramic thermal barrier coating towards the substrate and defining a plurality of columns of the ceramic thermal barrier coating; and
a second coating layer overlying the first coating layer and conformally coating the plurality of gaps;
wherein the second coating layer is deposited over the first coating layer by atomic layer deposition.
2. The superalloy component of claim 1, further comprising a bonding coat located between the superalloy substrate and the first coating layer;
wherein the bonding coat is deposited over the superalloy substrate by atomic layer deposition.
3. The superalloy component of claim 1, wherein the plurality of gaps are micron sized gaps.
4. The superalloy component of claim 1, wherein the plurality of gaps are sub-micron sized gaps.
5. The superalloy component of claim 1, wherein the first coating layer and the second coating layer are selected from the group consisting of oxides, carbides, nitrides, suicides, and metals.
6. The superalloy component of claim 5, wherein the oxides are selected from the group consisting of Al.sub.2O.sub.3, Cr.sub.2O.sub.3, Sc.sub.2O.sub.3, SiO.sub.2, ZrO.sub.2, and Ta.sub.2O.sub.5. HfO.sub.2, TiO.sub.2, Ln.sub.2O.sub.3, MgO, SrO, and alloys and compounds thereof.
7. The superalloy component of claim 5, wherein the nitrides are selected from the group consisting of TaN, ZrN, HfN, TiN, Si.sub.3N.sub.4 and alloys and compounds thereof.
8. The superalloy component of claim 5, wherein the carbides are selected from the group consisting of SiC, TaC, ZrC, HfC and alloys and compounds thereof.
9. The superalloy component of claim 5, wherein the suicides are selected from the group consisting of MoSi.sub.2, Mo.sub.5Si.sub.3, TaSi.sub.2, Ta.sub.5Si.sub.3, and alloys and compounds thereof.
10. The superalloy component of claim 5, wherein the metals are selected from the group consisting of Pt, Ru, Rd, Ir, and alloys and compounds thereof.
11. A method for coating nickel-based superalloy gas turbine components, comprising:
depositing an yttria-stabilized zirconia layer onto a nickel superalloy turbine component, by electron beam plasma vapor deposition, such that the yttria-stabilized zirconia layer is in the form of columnar grains; and
depositing an inorganic layer, by atomic layer deposition, onto the yttria-stabilized zirconia layer, such that the inorganic layer is uniform and conformal.
12. The method of claim 11, further comprising depositing a bonding coat onto the nickel superalloy turbine component, by atomic layer deposition, before depositing the yttria-stabilized zirconia layer.
13. The method of claim 11, wherein the inorganic layer is selected from the group consisting of aluminum oxide (Al.sub.2O.sub.3), tantalum carbide (TaC), tantalum oxide (Ta.sub.2O.sub.5), hafnium oxide (HfO.sub.2), mixtures thereof, nano-laminates thereof, and alloys thereof.
14. The method of claim 11, wherein the inorganic layer is selected from the group consisting of silicon carbide (SiC), silicon nitride (Si.sub.3N.sub.4), oxycarbides, carbonitrides, mixtures thereof, nano-laminates thereof, and alloys thereof.
15. The method of claim 11, wherein the nickel-based superalloy gas turbine component comprises an article selected from the group consisting of a turbine blade, a turbine vane, a combustor fuel nozzle, and a combustor shield.
16. The method of claim 11, wherein the inorganic layer comprises platinum.
17. A method for coating a substrate comprising:
etching chemically a thermal barrier coating such that the thermal barrier coating is in the form of columnar grains; and
depositing an inorganic layer, by atomic layer deposition, onto the thermal barrier coating, such that the inorganic layer is uniform and conformal.
18. The method of claim 17, wherein the inorganic layer is selected from the group consisting of aluminum oxide (Al.sub.2O.sub.3), tantalum carbide (TaC), hafnium oxide (HfO.sub.2), mixtures thereof, nano-laminates thereof, and alloys thereof.
19. The method of claim 17, wherein the inorganic layer is selected from the group consisting of silicon carbide (SiC), silicon nitride (Si.sub.3N.sub.4), oxycarbides, carbonitrides, mixtures thereof, nano-laminates thereof, and alloys thereof.
Description
    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • [0001]
    This is a division of application Ser. No. 10/759,810 filed Jan. 16, 2004 which is now U.S. Pat. No. 7,285,312 issued Oct. 23, 2007.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • [0002]
    This invention relates generally to thermal barrier and environmental barrier coatings for metallic and ceramic substrates and in particular to thermal barrier coatings and environmental barrier coatings that are resistant to sintering and oxidation damage for components in gas turbine engines.
  • [0003]
    As gas turbine engine technology advances and engines are required to be more efficient, gas temperatures within the engines continue to rise. However, the ability to operate at these increasing temperatures is limited by the ability of the superalloy turbine blades and vanes to maintain their mechanical strength when exposed to the heat, oxidation, and corrosive effects of the impinging gas. One approach to this problem has been to apply a protective thermal barrier coating (TBC) or environmental barrier coating (EBC) which insulates the blades and vanes from higher gas temperatures and hot gas corrosion, and to apply an interfacial bonding coat between the thermal barrier coating and the substrate to inhibit oxidation. The TBC for metallic substances typically consists mainly of ZrO2 ceramic, which is known to have low thermal conductivity and therefore reduces the substrate temperature under gas turbine engine operating conditions. Typically, the ZrO2 ceramic TBC contains additives to stabilize the crystalline structure and prevent the phase transformation as the TBC goes through temperature cycles. The most common additive for stabilizing the zirconia is Y2O3.
  • [0004]
    For high performance turbine blade and vane applications where the surface finish and lifetime of the coating are important, Electron Beam Physical Vapor Deposition (EBPVD) TBC is often used to coat substrates. Furthermore, to have low thermal conductivity, it is desirable that the TBC contains pores or other microstructure features that can scatter phonons. Typically, the EBPVD TBC will have an outer ceramic layer that has a columnar-grained microstructure. Gaps between the individual columns allow the columnar grains to expand and contract without developing stresses that could cause spalling. Strangman, U.S. Pat. Nos. 4,321,311; 4,401,697; and 4,405,659, discloses a thermal barrier coating system for a superalloy substrate that contains a MCrAlY layer, an alumina layer, and an outer columnar-grained ceramic layer. Duderstadt et al., U.S. Pat. No. 5,238,752 and Strangman, U.S. Pat. No. 5,514,482 disclose a thermal barrier coating system for a superalloy substrate that contains an aluminide layer, an alumina layer, and an outer columnar-grained ceramic layer.
  • [0005]
    A problem with columnar-grained ceramic layers is that when exposed to temperatures over 1100 degrees C. (2012 degrees F.) for substantial periods, sintering of the columnar grains occurs. As the columnar grains undergo thermal expansion, the columnar grains impinge upon each other. The gaps between columnar grains close as adjacent columnar grains bond together from sintering. Once the gaps become closed, the ceramic layer can no longer accommodate the thermal expansion and may spall or crack. The same problem also exists in plasma sprayed TBC, in which the pores and gaps in the typical laminar structure are sintered at use temperatures. In addition, sintering of the TBC increases the thermal conductivity of the coating, which is undesirable, since the thermal insulation property of the coating degrades and the temperature in the substrate increases. Frequent maintenance of turbine components is required due to the tendency for sintering of the TBC which causes the TBC to spall or crack and increase thermal conductivity. Conventionally, after about 100 cycles, turbine components must be removed to blast away the TBC or the EBC and then the turbine component is coated again. If a coating could be made more resistant to spalling, cracking and increases in thermal conductivity, then costly disassembly and maintenance may be minimized.
  • [0006]
    There have been attempts in the prior art to solve the problem of sintering of columnar grains in the EBPVD TBC or pores and gaps in the plasma-sprayed TBC. For zirconia-based TBC, one of the methods is to incorporate a material such as Al2O3 into the gaps or on the columnar grain surface. In principle, the existence of alumina in the gap or on the grain surface inhibits the sintering of the columnar grains, and can extend the lifetime of the EBPVD or plasma sprayed TBC. However, coating methods in the manner of the prior art tend to produce a coating that does not conform to the topography of the columnar grains. Instead, the coating adheres to only the top surface of the columnar grains. This can significantly reduce the effectiveness of the sintering inhibiting property of the coating. Another problem associated with the prior art coating on the top portion of the TBC is the thermal expansion and modulus mismatch created by the inhomogeneous distribution of the coating, which can shorten the bonding life of the TBC on the substrate.
  • [0007]
    Another major problem with a common TBC, such as a TBC containing ZrO2, HfO2 and Ta2O5, is poor oxidation barrier properties. These materials have the strong tendency to be in non-stoichiometric quantities with oxygen deficient structure. With the inherent high oxygen vacancy concentrations in these materials, oxygen atoms can move rapidly inside the materials. As a result, oxygen atoms, ions and molecules can diffuse easily from the environment through the TBC down to the bonding coat region, and attack the bonding coat and substrate underneath. Because of this poor oxygen diffusion barrier property, a TBC containing ZrO2, HfO2, or Ta2O5 is not effective at all in protecting the substrate from oxidation at high temperatures. Because of this problem, the substrate needs to be protected from oxidation by a bonding coat, such as alumina, platinum, platinum aluminide, and the like. However, even the bonding coat cannot sustain the oxidation attack for long, and a common failure mechanism of TBC is directly due to the formation and growth of thermally grown alumina due to oxidation at the interface between the substrate and the TBC.
  • [0008]
    The prior art is not specifically intended for high performance applications under extreme conditions, and some suffer from one or more of the following disadvantages:
  • [0009]
    a) non-conformity of coating layers.
  • [0010]
    b) inability to sustain high temperature conditions.
  • [0011]
    c) increased spalling and cracking.
  • [0012]
    d) subject to excessive oxygen diffusion.
  • [0013]
    As can be seen, there is a need for an improved apparatus and method for turbine components comprising inorganic layers applied to ceramic layer coatings that are resistant to sintering, conform to columnar grain topography, withstand higher temperatures and extreme conditions, resistant to oxygen diffusion, and minimize spalling and cracking.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • [0014]
    In one aspect of the present invention, a superalloy component having a ceramic thermal barrier coating on at least a portion of its surface, comprises a superalloy substrate; a ceramic coating overlying the superalloy substrate, the ceramic coating having a plurality of gaps extending from the top surface of the ceramic coating towards the substrate and defining a plurality of columns of the ceramic coating; and an inorganic layer overlying the ceramic coating and conformally coating the plurality of gaps; wherein the inorganic layer is deposited over the ceramic coating by atomic layer deposition.
  • [0015]
    In an alternative aspect of the present invention, a superalloy component having a ceramic thermal barrier coating on at least a portion of its surface, comprises a superalloy substrate; an yttria-stabilized zirconia layer overlying the superalloy substrate, the yttria-stabilized zirconia layer having a plurality of gaps extending from the top surface of the ceramic coating towards the substrate and defining a plurality of columns of the yttria-stabilized zirconia layer; and an aluminum oxide (Al2O3) layer overlying the yttria-stabilized zirconia layer and, conformally coating the plurality of gaps; wherein the aluminum oxide (Al2O3) layer is deposited over the yttria-stabilized zirconia layer by atomic layer deposition.
  • [0016]
    In another aspect of the present invention, a component having a ceramic environmental barrier coating on at least a portion of its surface, comprises a silicon-based substrate; a tantalum oxide (Ta2O5) layer overlying the silicon-based substrate, having a plurality of gaps extending from the top surface of the tantalum oxide (Ta2O5) layer towards the silicon-based substrate, and defining a plurality of columns of the tantalum oxide (Ta2O5) layer; and an aluminum oxide (Al2O3) layer overlying the tantalum oxide (Ta2O5) layer, conformally coating the plurality of gaps; wherein the aluminum oxide (Al2O3) layer is deposited over the tantalum oxide (Ta2O5) layer by atomic layer deposition.
  • [0017]
    In yet another aspect of the present invention, a superalloy component having a ceramic thermal barrier coating on at least a portion of its surface, comprises a superalloy substrate; a first coating layer overlying the superalloy substrate, the first coating layer having a thickness from about 5 nm to 5000 nm; the first coating layer having a plurality of gaps extending from the top surface of the first coating layer towards the substrate and defining a plurality of columns of the first coating layer; and a second coating layer overlying the first coating layer and conformally coating the plurality of gaps; wherein the second coating layer is deposited over the first coating layer by atomic layer deposition.
  • [0018]
    In still another aspect of the present invention, a method for coating a silicon-based substrate, comprises: depositing a tantalum oxide (Ta2O5) layer onto a silicon-based substrate, by electron beam physical vapor deposition, such that the tantalum oxide (Ta2O5) layer is in the form of columnar grains; and depositing an inorganic layer, by atomic layer deposition, onto the tantalum oxide (Ta2O5) layer, such that the inorganic layer is uniform and conformal.
  • [0019]
    In further aspect of the present invention, a method for coating nickel-based superalloy gas turbine components, comprises: depositing an yttria-stabilized zirconia layer onto a nickel superalloy turbine component, by electron beam plasma vapor deposition, such that the yttria-stabilized zirconia layer is in the form of columnar grains; and depositing an inorganic layer, by atomic layer deposition, onto the yttria-stabilized zirconia layer, such that the inorganic layer is uniform and conformal.
  • [0020]
    In yet another aspect of the present invention, a method for coating a substrate comprises etching chemically a thermal barrier coating such that the thermal barrier coating is in the form of columnar grains; and depositing an inorganic layer, by atomic layer deposition, onto the thermal barrier coating, using atomic layer deposition, such that the inorganic layer is uniform and conformal.
  • [0021]
    These and other aspects, objects, features and advantages of the present invention, are specifically set forth in, or will become apparent from, the following detailed description of a preferred embodiment of the invention when read in conjunction with the accompanying drawings.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0022]
    FIG. 1 is an isometric view of a turbine blade, according to an embodiment of the present invention;
  • [0023]
    FIG. 2 is a cross sectional schematic view of a coated turbine component according to an embodiment of the present invention;
  • [0024]
    FIG. 3 is a cross sectional schematic view of a coated article, with a silicon-based substrate, according to an embodiment of the present invention;
  • [0025]
    FIG. 4 is a flowchart demonstrating a method for coating a silicon-based substrate, according to an embodiment of the present invention;
  • [0026]
    FIG. 5 is a flowchart demonstrating a method for coating nickel-based superalloy gas turbine components, according to an embodiment of the present invention; and
  • [0027]
    FIG. 6 is a cross sectional schematic view of a thermal barrier coating of columnar grain structure with conformal multi-layered coating on the surface, according to an embodiment of the present invention.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION
  • [0028]
    The following detailed description is of the best currently contemplated modes of carrying out the invention. The description is not to be taken in a limiting sense, but is made merely for the purpose of illustrating the general principles of the invention, since the scope of the invention is best defined by the appended claims.
  • [0029]
    The present invention is generally applicable to components that operate within environments characterized by relatively high temperatures (e.g., temperatures in excess of about 1100 degrees C.), and are therefore subjected to severe thermal stresses and thermal cycling. Notable examples of such components include the high and low pressure turbine nozzles and blades, shrouds, vanes, combustor liners, combustor fuel nozzles, combustor shields, and augmentor hardware of gas turbine engines. One such example is the turbine blade 10 shown in FIG. 1. The turbine blade 10 generally includes an airfoil 12 against which hot combustion gases may be directed during operation of a gas turbine engine (not shown), and whose surface may therefore be subjected to severe attack by oxidation, corrosion and erosion. The airfoil 12 may be anchored to a turbine disk (not shown) with a dovetail 14 formed on a root section 16 of the turbine blade 10. Cooling passages 18 may be present in the airfoil 12 through which bleed air may be forced to transfer heat from the blade 10. While the advantages of this invention will be described with reference to the turbine blade 10 shown in FIG. 1, the teachings of this invention are generally applicable to any component on which an environmental or thermal barrier coating system may be used to protect the component from its environment.
  • [0030]
    Coating methods in the prior art tend to produce a coating that does not conform to the topography of the columnar grains. Instead, the coating may adhere to only the top surface of the columnar grains. Because substrates and coatings typically have relatively different coefficients of thermal expansion, coatings may not expand at the same rate as the substrates. As temperature increases (e.g., around 1400 degrees C.), the surface grains expand. Upon surface grain expansion, the adjacent grains make contact and sinter. After frequent exposure to extreme temperatures, the surface may gradually lose the ability to accommodate thermal expansion strains. Coating the surface grains, by atomic layer deposition to fill surface gaps and microcracks, may reduce the tendency of the gaps and microcracks to close by sintering during service of the silicon-based substrates and turbine components.
  • [0031]
    Atomic layer deposition can form one atomic layer at a time. Depositing one atomic layer at a time is desirable for creating layers of uniform thickness with controlled composition within surface microcracks and gaps with extremely high conformability. By conforming to the topography of the columnar grain surface, adjacent columnar grain surfaces do not touch each other directly, thereby preventing sintering. This offers significant benefit over the prior art, which used powder slurry, sol-gel, physical vapor deposition, and chemical vapor deposition to attempt to coat the surface of the columnar grains. The prior art methods cannot uniformly coat the surface of the columnar grains, and cannot penetrate deeply to the bottom of the columnar grains. Furthermore, the methods employed in the prior art tend to preferentially coat the upper part surface of the columnar grains where the gap is wider. Consequently, the columnar grains of the TBC with conventional surface coating tend to sinter inhomogeneously due to the non-uniform surface coating during service, and may result in shorter life in the TBC.
  • [0032]
    Another advantage for the coating of this invention is that the oxidation resistance of the TBC system is much improved over the prior art. The near 100% conformal coating on the columnar grain surface, applied by an atomic layer deposition method, completely seals off the surface previously exposed to the environment by the conformal coating. By depositing a conformal layer of inorganic materials of oxides, carbides, nitrides, silicides, and their compounds of lower oxygen diffusion coefficients than that of the TBC materials such as ZrO2, HfO2 and Ta2O5, oxygen diffusion through the TBC with conformal surface coating is retarded. As a result, the oxidation resistance of the thermal barrier coating system is improved over the prior art.
  • [0033]
    As shown in FIG. 2, a bonding coat 34 may lie over a superalloy substrate 32, for securely joining subsequent layers (e.g., ceramic layer 28) to the superalloy substrate 32. The bonding coat 34 may be comprised of a MCrAlY alloy. Such alloys have a broad composition of about 10 to about 35% chromium, about 5 to about 15% aluminum, about 0.01 to 1% about yttrium, or hafnium, or lanthanum, with M being the balance. M may be selected from a group consisting of iron, cobalt, nickel, and mixtures thereof. Minor amounts (e.g., about 5% to about 10%) of other elements such as Ta or Si may also be present. The MCrAlY bonding coat 34 may be applied by, for example, electron beam vapor deposition though sputtering and low pressure plasma spraying may also be used. Alternatively, the bonding coat 34 may be comprised of an intermetallic aluminide such as nickel aluminide or platinum aluminide. The aluminide bonding coat 34 may be applied by standard commercially available aluminide processes whereby aluminum is reacted at the superalloy substrate 32 surface 50 to form an aluminum intermetallic compound, which may provide a reservoir for the growth of an alumina scale oxidation resistant layer. Thus the aluminide bonding coat 34 may be predominately composed of an aluminum intermetallic [e.g., NiAl, CoAl, FeAl and (Ni, Co, Fe) Al phases] formed by reacting aluminum vapor species or aluminum rich alloy powder with the superalloy substrate 32 elements at the surface 50. Diffusion aluminiding may be accomplished by one of several conventional prior art techniques, such as the pack cementation process, spraying, chemical vapor deposition, electrophoresis, sputtering, and slurry sintering with an aluminum rich vapor and appropriate diffusion heat treatments. Other beneficial elements can also be incorporated into diffusion aluminide coatings by a variety of processes. Beneficial elements include Pt, Pd, Si, Hf and oxide particles, such as alumina, yttria, hafnia, for enhancement of alumina scale adhesion; Cr and Mn for hot corrosion resistance; Rh, Ta and Cb for diffusional stability and/or oxidation resistance; and Ni and Co for increasing ductility or incipient melting limits.
  • [0034]
    In the specific case of platinum modified diffusion aluminide coating layers, the coating phases adjacent to the alumina scale may be platinum aluminide and/or nickel-platinum aluminide phases (on a Ni-base superalloy).
  • [0035]
    With reference to FIG. 2, it is within the scope of the present invention to apply the method of atomic layer deposition to form bonding coat 34 of the compositions mentioned above, or additional inorganic layers 22 below or above the bonding coat 34 formed from traditional methods to improve oxidation protection properties. The inorganic layers 22 formed by the atomic layer deposition method may reduce the diffusion of oxygen into the substrate 32 or the outward diffusion of alloying elements in the substrate 32. The inorganic coatings formed by atomic layer deposition may be at a thickness in the range of about 5 nm to about 5,000 nm, and preferably at a thickness in the range of about 5 nm to about 2,500 nm. The inorganic layer 22 may comprise a compound of Al, Hf, Si, Ln (rare earth including entire lanthanum series, scandium and yttrium), Mg, Mo, Ni, Nb, Sr, or Ti. In addition, the inorganic layers 22 may be selected from the group consisting of oxides, carbides, nitrides, silicides, and metals. The oxides may be selected from the group consisting of Al2O3, Cr2O3, Sc2O3, SiO2, ZrO2, and Ta2O5, HfO2, TiO2, Ln2O3, MgO, SrO, and alloys and compounds thereof. The nitrides may be selected from the group consisting of TaN, ZrN, HfN, TiN, Si3N4 and alloys and compounds thereof. The carbides may be selected from the group consisting of SiC, TaC, ZrC, HfC and alloys and compounds thereof. The silicides may be selected from the group consisting of MoSi2, Mo5Si3, TaSi2, Ta5Si3, and alloys and compounds thereof. The metals may be selected from the group consisting of Pt, Ru, Rd, Ir, and alloys and compounds thereof.
  • [0036]
    The ceramic layer 28 may be used as a thermal barrier coating or an environmental barrier coating, may be applied onto the bonding coat 34 by electron beam physical vapor deposition (EBPVD) and as result may have a columnar grained microstructure. Ceramic layer 28 includes columnar grains or columns 30 which may be oriented substantially perpendicular to the surface 50 of the superalloy substrate 32. Sub-micron and micron sized gaps 20 may extend between the individual columns 30 from the top 36 of the ceramic layer 28 toward, and within a few microns of, the bonding coat 34. The presence of intercolumnar gaps 20 may reduce the effective modulus (increases compliance) of the bonding coat 34 and the ceramic coating 28. Increased compliance provided by the gaps 20 may enhance ceramic layer 28 durability by eliminating or minimizing stresses associated with thermal gradients and superalloy/coating thermal expansion mismatch strains in the ceramic layer 28. Alternatively, the ceramic layer 28 may be applied by a plasma spray process. Although this process may not produce a columnar microstructure, it may create an interconnected network of subcritical microcracks with micron-width opening displacements, which reduce the modulus of the ceramic layer 28. The network of subcritical microcracks may perform the same function as the gaps 20. In this application, the term “gap” 20 includes these microcracks.
  • [0037]
    The ceramic layer 28 may be any of the conventional ceramic compositions used for thermal barrier coatings or environmental barrier coatings. An exemplary composition is a yttria-stabilized zirconia layer, which is zirconia (zirconium oxide) with from about 3 weight % to about 12 weight % yttria (yttrium oxide) added to stabilize the zirconia against phase changes that otherwise occur as a thermal barrier coating is heated and cooled during manufacture and service. Yttria-stabilized zirconia ceramic layers 28 may have a thermal conductivity that is about 1 and one-half orders of magnitude lower than that of the typical superalloy substrate such as MAR-M247. Instead of, or in addition to the yttria, the zirconia may be stabilized with CaO, MgO, CeO2 as well as Y2O3. Another ceramic believed to be useful in the columnar form, within the scope of the present invention, is hafnia, which may be yttria-stabilized. The particular ceramic material selected should be stable in the high temperature environment of a gas turbine. Another example of a ceramic useful for the ceramic layer 28 is tantalum oxide (Ta2O5). The thickness 38 of the ceramic layer 28 may vary from about 0.05 mm to about 1.3 mm.
  • [0038]
    Because of differences in the coefficients of thermal expansion between the superalloy substrate 32 and the ceramic layer 28, when heated or cooled, the superalloy substrate 32 may expand (or contract) at a greater rate than the ceramic layer 28. The gaps 20 allow the columnar grains 30 to expand and contract without producing stresses that would cause the ceramic layer 28 to spall or crack.
  • [0039]
    When exposed to temperatures over 1100 degrees C. (2012 degrees F.) for periods of time, sintering of the columnar grains 30 occurs. The gaps 20 close as adjacent columnar grains 30 bond together. With the gaps 20 closed, the ceramic layer 28 may be less able to accommodate the thermal expansion mismatch and may spall or crack. Resistance to sintering is imparted to the columnar grains 30 by sheathing them with a inorganic layer 22. As shown in FIGS. 2 and 3, the inorganic layer 22 or 48 is applied such that it is conformally coating the plurality of sub-micron and micron sized gaps 20. The inorganic layer 22 may comprise a substance selected from the group consisting of oxides, nitrides, carbides, silicides, metal films (for example, platinum), metal alloy films, and laminates thereof. Additionally, the inorganic layer 22 may comprise a compound (e.g., oxides, nitrides, carbides, borides, silicides) of Al, Hf, Zr, Ta, Si, Ln (rare earth including the entire lanthanum series, scandium and yttrium), Mg, Mo, Ni, Nb, Sr, or Ti. These types of inorganic layers 22 may withstand repeated fluctuations in temperature extremes and thereby inhibit bonding of adjacent grains 30.
  • [0040]
    The inorganic layer 22 may be applied by atomic layer deposition, at a thickness in the range of about 5 nm to about 5,000 nm, and preferably at a thickness in the range of about 5 nm to about 2,500 nm.
  • [0041]
    Besides coating superalloy substrates, 32, the present invention also may be useful for coating silicon-based substrates, as shown in FIG. 3. A component 40 having a ceramic environmental barrier coating 42 on at least a portion of its surface 50 may comprise a silicon-based substrate 44, a suitable ceramic environmental barrier coating 42, for example, a tantalum oxide (Ta2O5) layer overlying the silicon-based substrate 44; and a suitable material to prevent sintering, for example, an aluminum oxide (Al2O3) layer 48 overlying the ceramic environmental barrier coating 42; wherein the aluminum oxide (Al2O3) layer 48 may be deposited over the ceramic environmental barrier coating 42 by atomic layer deposition.
  • [0042]
    A method for depositing an environmental barrier coating onto a silicon-based substrate 44 may be shown with reference to step 200 in the flow chart in FIG. 4 and FIG. 3. A suitable ceramic environmental barrier coating 42, for example, a tantalum oxide (Ta2O5) layer may be deposited onto a silicon-based substrate 44 with an inorganic layer 48 as an environmental barrier coating. The silicon-based substrate 44 may be one of a silicon nitride substrate and a silicon carbide substrate. A ceramic environmental barrier coating 42, for example, a tantalum oxide (Ta2O5) layer, may be deposited by electron beam physical vapor deposition (EBPVD). With the use of EBPVD, the ceramic environmental barrier coating 42, for example, a tantalum oxide (Ta2O5) layer may be deposited in the form of columnar grains 30.
  • [0043]
    In step 210 of FIG. 4, an inorganic layer 48, such as aluminum oxide (Al2O3), may be deposited, by atomic layer deposition onto the ceramic environmental barrier coating 42, such as a tantalum oxide (Ta2O5) layer, such that the inorganic layer 48 may be uniform and conformal. The inorganic layer 48 [ok] may comprise a substance selected from the group consisting of aluminum oxide (Al2O3), tantalum carbide (TaC), hafnium oxide (HfO2), mixtures thereof, nano-laminates thereof, and alloys thereof. With continuing reference to step 210 of FIG. 4, the inorganic layer 48 may also comprise a substance selected from the group consisting of silicon carbide (SiC), silicon nitride (Si3N4), oxycarbides, carbonitrides, mixtures thereof, nano-laminates thereof, and alloys thereof.
  • [0044]
    While the method shown in FIG. 4 concerned a thermal barrier coating for a silicon-based substrate 44, the method shown in FIG. 5, with reference to FIG. 2 concerns coating a nickel superalloy turbine component 40. A suitable ceramic layer, for example, an yttria-stabilized zirconia layer 28 may be deposited onto a nickel superalloy turbine component 40. The component 40 may be selected from the group consisting of a turbine blade, a turbine vane, a combustor fuel nozzle, and a combustor shield. In step 200 in the flow chart in FIG. 5, an yttria-stabilized zirconia layer 28 may be deposited onto the superalloy substrate 32 by EBPVD, which may result in the yttria-stabilized zirconia layer 28 being in the form of columnar grains 30. Optionally, a bonding coat 34 (for example, NiCrAlY) may be applied before applying the yttria-stabilized zirconia layer 28. In step 230 of FIG. 5, with continuing reference to FIG. 2, an inorganic layer 22 may be deposited onto the superalloy substrate 32. The inorganic layer 22 may comprise a substance selected from the group consisting of aluminum oxide (Al2O3), tantalum carbide (TaC), tantalum oxide (Ta2O5), hafnium oxide (HfO2), mixtures thereof, nano-laminates thereof, and alloys thereof. With continuing reference to step 230 of FIG. 5 and FIG. 2, the inorganic layer 22 may also comprise a substance selected from the group consisting of silicon carbide (SiC), silicon nitride (Si3N4), oxycarbides, carbonitrides, mixtures thereof, nano-laminates thereof, and alloys thereof. The yttria-stabilized zirconia layer 28 may be uniform and conformal.
  • [0045]
    As shown in FIG. 6, a superalloy component 40 may have a ceramic thermal barrier coating 58 on at least a portion of its surface. A superalloy substrate 32 may have the ceramic thermal barrier coating 58 overlying the superalloy substrate 32. The superalloy substrate 32 may also have a bonding coat 34 in between the superalloy substrate 32 and the ceramic thermal barrier coating 58. The ceramic thermal barrier coating 58 may have a first coating layer 68 overlying the ceramic thermal barrier coating 58. The first coating layer 68 may be deposited over the ceramic thermal barrier coating 58 by atomic layer deposition. The first coating layer 68 may have a thickness from about 5 nm to about 5000 nm. The first coating layer 68 may have a plurality of gaps 20 extending from the top surface 36 of the first coating layer 68 towards the substrate 32 and defining a plurality of columns 30 of the first coating layer 68. The plurality of gaps 20 may be micron sized gaps 20 or sub-micron gaps 20. Additionally, the superalloy substrate 32 may have a second coating layer 78 overlying the first coating layer 68 and conformally coating the plurality of gaps 20. The second coating layer 78 may be deposited over the first coating layer 68 by atomic layer deposition.
  • [0046]
    The first coating layer 68 and the second coating layer 78 may be selected from the group consisting of oxides, carbides, nitrides, silicides, and metals. The oxides may be selected from the group consisting of Al2O3, Cr2O3, Sc2O3, SiO2, ZrO2, and Ta2O5, HfO2, TiO2, Ln2O3, MgO, SrO, and alloys and compounds thereof. The nitrides may be selected from the group consisting of TaN, ZrN, HfN, TiN, Si3N4 and alloys and compounds thereof. The carbides may be selected from the group consisting of SiC, TaC, ZrC, HfC and alloys and compounds thereof. The suicides may be selected from the group consisting of MoSi2, Mo5Si3, TaSi2, Ta5Si3, and alloys and compounds thereof. The metals may be selected from the group consisting of Pt, Ru, Rd, Ir, and alloys and compounds thereof.
  • [0047]
    To fabricate the improved TBC and EBC of the present invention, parts that already have the bonding coat and conventional TBC or EBC on the surface may be loaded into a chamber that can be heated to high temperatures (>500 C.). Either a vacuum type reactor or a flow type reactor may be used in the manufacturing of the products of the present invention. A batch reactor may be used so that multiple parts may be coated. The chamber may either be evacuated by a vacuum pump and maintain in vacuum, or back-filled with an inert gas, such as Ar, while maintaining a continuous flow of Ar. The parts may be heated to a temperature window in which the atomic layer deposition process occurs, typically in the temperature range of 100 to 500 C., and most likely to be in the temperature range of 200-400 C. With the parts in the chamber heated to the desirable temperature, a dose of precursor gas may be pulsed into the chamber. The precursor contains a chemical element that is one of the constituents of the film to be deposited. As an example, if the goal is to form Al2O3 film on the columnar grain surface, the precursor gas would contain aluminum. Another precursor to be used may be Trimethyl aluminum [Al(CH3)3], of the alkyl group. Another precursor may also be halide, such as AlCl3. When the metal precursor is pulsed into the chamber, the precursor gas may chemically adsorb onto the part surface and form a monolayer of molecule. Because of the nature of this process, the precursor gas forms a monolayer of molecules uniformly on all the surfaces of the parts. Even though the opening of the gap between the columnar grains in the EBPVD TBC may be sub-micron size, the precursor gas molecule may diffuse through the opening and coat the deepest surface within the gap. The pulse time of this step may be less than 10 seconds, preferably less than 5 seconds, and most preferably less than one second. After this pulsing step, the chamber may be evacuated or purged with inert gas to remove any non-absorbed precursor gas. This evacuation or purging step may take ten seconds, preferably less than 5 seconds, and most preferably less than one second. After the purge, another dose of a precursor gas, this time a precursor that contains the non-metal element in the coating, may be pulsed into the chamber. For instance, to form the Al2O3 coating, the second precursor may be H20 vapor, or oxygen, or ozone. Using H2O precursor as the example, the H2O molecule may react with the previously adsorbed monolayer of Al(CH3)3 on the columnar grain surface, and form a new layer of Al—(OH)X molecules as the reaction product, and the exhaust gas of CH4. Following another purge to remove the residual H2O and CH4, a new dose of a metal-containing precursor such as the Al(CH3)3 may be pulsed into the chamber. Again, the metal-containing precursor may react on the surface of the parts to form a new monolayer of molecules. In the example of forming Al2O3, the fresh Al(CH3)3 precursor may react with the previously formed Al—(OH)X molecule to form Al—O—Al—(CH3)Y on the surface and gas exhaust of CH4. By sequentially repeating the pulse and purge steps of the precursors, a uniform, conformal, fully dense, and pinhole-free layer of Al2O3 may be formed that covers all the gap surface of the TBC. Each cycle of pulsing and purging two different precursors to form a compound may create a layer thickness of about one angstrom. By counting the numbers of deposition cycles, a coating of accurate thickness with extreme uniformity and conformity may be formed. To form laminates of two or more different alternating coatings, any time during the deposition a different metal-precursor may be used to form a new layer of material. To form an atomically mixed alloy of different elements, a mixed precursor of those elements may be used.
  • [0048]
    Furthermore, this invention covers the manufacturing of TBC and EBC by combining the processes of etching the columnar-grained TBC and EBC, followed by atomic layer deposition. The etching may be wet-chemical or plasma-gas dry etching for ZrO2, HfO2, and Ta2O5 materials, using the known chemicals and processes in the chemical and semiconductor industries. In wet etching, etching solutions containing HF may be used, while in the dry etching, typically chlorine and fluorine containing plasma gases may be used. Following in the etching of the TBC and EBC, the parts may be rinsed, cleaned, dried, and loaded into an atomic layer deposition chamber for the deposition steps. By etching the TBC and the EBC, the gaps in those coatings may be widened, and thicker layers with tailored compositions may be deposited by atomic layer deposition. This etching process may reduce the gap-space limitation imposed by the as-grown EBPVD columnar grains, and may enable the development of tailored compositions and laminates of various coatings by atomic layer deposition.
  • [0049]
    Although the present invention has been described in considerable detail with reference to certain preferred versions thereof, other versions are possible. Therefore, the spirit and scope of the appended claims should not be limited to the description of the preferred versions contained therein.
Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3819990 *29 Dec 197225 Jun 1974Matsushita Electric Ind Co LtdThin-film capacitor and method for the fabrication thereof
US5305143 *9 Aug 199119 Apr 1994Kabushiki Kaisha Toyota Chuo KenkyushoInorganic thin film polarizer
US5562998 *18 Nov 19948 Oct 1996Alliedsignal Inc.Durable thermal barrier coating
US5660697 *2 Jun 199526 Aug 1997Fuji Electric Co., Ltd.Electroluminescent display device and method of manufacturing same
US5855753 *26 Nov 19965 Jan 1999The Trustees Of Princeton UniversityMethod for electrohydrodynamically assembling patterned colloidal structures
US5998003 *10 Sep 19987 Dec 1999Electric Power Research Institute, Inc.Multilayer nanostructured ceramic thermal barrier coatings
US6060177 *19 Feb 19989 May 2000United Technologies CorporationMethod of applying an overcoat to a thermal barrier coating and coated article
US6099976 *11 Sep 19978 Aug 2000Lemelson; Jerome H.Synthetic diamond overlays for gas turbine engine parts having thermal barrier coatings
US6103386 *6 Oct 199715 Aug 2000Allied Signal IncThermal barrier coating with alumina bond inhibitor
US6203613 *19 Oct 199920 Mar 2001International Business Machines CorporationAtomic layer deposition with nitrate containing precursors
US6203927 *5 Feb 199920 Mar 2001Siemens Westinghouse Power CorporationThermal barrier coating resistant to sintering
US6277681 *16 Mar 199921 Aug 2001Texas Instruments IncorporatedProcess to produce ultrathin crystalline silicon nitride on Si(111) for advanced gate dielectrics
US6335238 *5 May 19981 Jan 2002Texas Instruments IncorporatedIntegrated dielectric and method
US6394755 *24 Jan 200028 May 2002General Electric CompanyEnhanced coating system for turbine airfoil applications
US6416870 *28 Jul 20009 Jul 2002Microcoating Technologies, Inc.Corrosion-resistant multilayer coatings
US6482537 *24 Mar 200019 Nov 2002Honeywell International, Inc.Lower conductivity barrier coating
US6486021 *4 Dec 200026 Nov 2002Hyundai Electronics Industries Co., Ltd.Method for manufacturing a semiconductor device having incorporated therein a high K capacitor dielectric
US6492038 *27 Nov 200010 Dec 2002General Electric CompanyThermally-stabilized thermal barrier coating and process therefor
US6503330 *22 Dec 19997 Jan 2003Genus, Inc.Apparatus and method to achieve continuous interface and ultrathin film during atomic layer deposition
US6563183 *28 Feb 200213 May 2003Advanced Micro Devices, Inc.Gate array with multiple dielectric properties and method for forming same
US6580115 *19 Jul 200117 Jun 2003Micron Technology, Inc.Capacitor electrode for integrating high k materials
US6582779 *11 Aug 199924 Jun 2003Alliedsignal, Inc.Silicon nitride components with protective coating
US6585823 *7 Jul 20001 Jul 2003Asm International, N.V.Atomic layer deposition
US6982126 *26 Nov 20033 Jan 2006General Electric CompanyThermal barrier coating
US20020172838 *12 Apr 200121 Nov 2002Rigney Joseph DavidYttria-stabilized zirconia with reduced thermal conductivity
US20030026989 *16 Jul 20026 Feb 2003George Steven M.Insulating and functionalizing fine metal-containing particles with conformal ultra-thin films
US20030059633 *21 Sep 200127 Mar 2003Ackerman John FrederickArticle protected by thermal barrier coating having a sintering inhibitor, and its fabrication
US20030207031 *6 May 20026 Nov 2003Honeywell International, Inc.Methods to make nanolaminate thermal barrier coatings
US20040125541 *22 Jul 20031 Jul 2004Hyun-Jin ChungCapacitor having oxygen diffusion barrier and method for fabricating the same
US20050112381 *21 Nov 200326 May 2005Honeywell International Inc.Oxidation barrier coatings for silicon based ceramics
US20050112412 *26 Nov 200326 May 2005General Electric CompanyThermal barrier coating
US20060246319 *2 May 20052 Nov 2006Honeywell International, Inc.Impact-resistant multilayer coating
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7874472 *10 Apr 200825 Jan 2011United Technologies CorporationMethod for diffusion bonding metallic components with nanoparticle foil
US80517248 May 20088 Nov 2011SDCmaterials, Inc.Long cool-down tube with air input joints
US81426198 May 200827 Mar 2012Sdc Materials Inc.Shape of cone and air input annulus
US847011214 Dec 201025 Jun 2013SDCmaterials, Inc.Workflow for novel composite materials
US848144911 Dec 20079 Jul 2013SDCmaterials, Inc.Method and system for forming plug and play oxide catalysts
US850740111 Dec 200713 Aug 2013SDCmaterials, Inc.Method and system for forming plug and play metal catalysts
US850740228 May 200913 Aug 2013SDCmaterials, Inc.Method and system for forming plug and play metal catalysts
US85246319 May 20083 Sep 2013SDCmaterials, Inc.Nano-skeletal catalyst
US854565214 Dec 20101 Oct 2013SDCmaterials, Inc.Impact resistant material
US85577277 Dec 201015 Oct 2013SDCmaterials, Inc.Method of forming a catalyst with inhibited mobility of nano-active material
US85744088 May 20085 Nov 2013SDCmaterials, Inc.Fluid recirculation system for use in vapor phase particle production system
US857505911 Dec 20075 Nov 2013SDCmaterials, Inc.Method and system for forming plug and play metal compound catalysts
US860439810 Nov 201010 Dec 2013SDCmaterials, Inc.Microwave purification process
US86529927 Dec 201018 Feb 2014SDCmaterials, Inc.Pinning and affixing nano-active material
US86635719 May 20084 Mar 2014SDCmaterials, Inc.Method and apparatus for making uniform and ultrasmall nanoparticles
US866880314 Dec 201011 Mar 2014SDCmaterials, Inc.Sandwich of impact resistant material
US866920223 Feb 201111 Mar 2014SDCmaterials, Inc.Wet chemical and plasma methods of forming stable PtPd catalysts
US867943317 Aug 201225 Mar 2014SDCmaterials, Inc.Coated substrates for use in catalysis and catalytic converters and methods of coating substrates with washcoat compositions
US875924819 Nov 201224 Jun 2014SDCmaterials, Inc.Method and system for forming plug and play metal catalysts
US880302510 Dec 201012 Aug 2014SDCmaterials, Inc.Non-plugging D.C. plasma gun
US882178615 Dec 20102 Sep 2014SDCmaterials, Inc.Method of forming oxide dispersion strengthened alloys
US882832815 Dec 20109 Sep 2014SDCmaterails, Inc.Methods and apparatuses for nano-materials powder treatment and preservation
US88590357 Dec 201014 Oct 2014SDCmaterials, Inc.Powder treatment for enhanced flowability
US886561113 Sep 201321 Oct 2014SDCmaterials, Inc.Method of forming a catalyst with inhibited mobility of nano-active material
US887735714 Dec 20104 Nov 2014SDCmaterials, Inc.Impact resistant material
US88936518 May 200825 Nov 2014SDCmaterials, Inc.Plasma-arc vaporization chamber with wide bore
US890631631 May 20139 Dec 2014SDCmaterials, Inc.Fluid recirculation system for use in vapor phase particle production system
US890649814 Dec 20109 Dec 2014SDCmaterials, Inc.Sandwich of impact resistant material
US89325147 Dec 201013 Jan 2015SDCmaterials, Inc.Fracture toughness of glass
US895657410 Sep 201017 Feb 2015SDCmaterials, Inc.Gas delivery system with constant overpressure relative to ambient to system with varying vacuum suction
US896923727 Jan 20143 Mar 2015SDCmaterials, Inc.Coated substrates for use in catalysis and catalytic converters and methods of coating substrates with washcoat compositions
US89928207 Dec 201031 Mar 2015SDCmaterials, Inc.Fracture toughness of ceramics
US902375430 Jul 20135 May 2015SDCmaterials, Inc.Nano-skeletal catalyst
US90399166 Dec 201026 May 2015SDCmaterials, Inc.In situ oxide removal, dispersal and drying for copper copper-oxide
US908984018 Jun 201328 Jul 2015SDCmaterials, Inc.Method and system for forming plug and play oxide catalysts
US90904756 Dec 201028 Jul 2015SDCmaterials, Inc.In situ oxide removal, dispersal and drying for silicon SiO2
US91193096 Dec 201025 Aug 2015SDCmaterials, Inc.In situ oxide removal, dispersal and drying
US91261917 Dec 20108 Sep 2015SDCmaterials, Inc.Advanced catalysts for automotive applications
US91324049 May 200815 Sep 2015SDCmaterials, Inc.Gas delivery system with constant overpressure relative to ambient to system with varying vacuum suction
US914979710 Dec 20106 Oct 2015SDCmaterials, Inc.Catalyst production method and system
US915602513 Mar 201313 Oct 2015SDCmaterials, Inc.Three-way catalytic converter using nanoparticles
US91804238 May 200810 Nov 2015SDCmaterials, Inc.Highly turbulent quench chamber
US918666326 Aug 201317 Nov 2015SDCmaterials, Inc.Method and system for forming plug and play metal compound catalysts
US921639827 Jan 201422 Dec 2015SDCmaterials, Inc.Method and apparatus for making uniform and ultrasmall nanoparticles
US92164067 Feb 201422 Dec 2015SDCmaterials, Inc.Wet chemical and plasma methods of forming stable PtPd catalysts
US930226026 Apr 20135 Apr 2016SDCmaterials, Inc.Method and system for forming plug and play metal catalysts
US930852412 Sep 201412 Apr 2016SDCmaterials, Inc.Advanced catalysts for automotive applications
US933263610 Feb 20143 May 2016SDCmaterials, Inc.Sandwich of impact resistant material
US942773222 Oct 201430 Aug 2016SDCmaterials, Inc.Catalyst design for heavy-duty diesel combustion engines
US943393819 Nov 20156 Sep 2016SDCmaterials, Inc.Wet chemical and plasma methods of forming stable PTPD catalysts
US949875116 Jan 201522 Nov 2016SDCmaterials, Inc.Coated substrates for use in catalysis and catalytic converters and methods of coating substrates with washcoat compositions
US951135220 Nov 20136 Dec 2016SDCmaterials, Inc.Three-way catalytic converter using nanoparticles
US951744822 Oct 201413 Dec 2016SDCmaterials, Inc.Compositions of lean NOx trap (LNT) systems and methods of making and using same
US952238813 Jan 201420 Dec 2016SDCmaterials, Inc.Pinning and affixing nano-active material
US95332894 Aug 20153 Jan 2017SDCmaterials, Inc.Advanced catalysts for automotive applications
US95332994 Sep 20153 Jan 2017SDCmaterials, Inc.Three-way catalytic converter using nanoparticles
US956656811 May 201614 Feb 2017SDCmaterials, Inc.Catalyst design for heavy-duty diesel combustion engines
US958617924 Jul 20147 Mar 2017SDCmaterials, Inc.Washcoats and coated substrates for catalytic converters and methods of making and using same
US959249219 Jun 201514 Mar 2017SDCmaterials, Inc.Method and system for forming plug and play oxide catalysts
US959766219 Oct 201521 Mar 2017SDCmaterials, Inc.Method and system for forming plug and play metal compound catalysts
US959940512 Oct 201521 Mar 2017SDCmaterials, Inc.Highly turbulent quench chamber
US968781119 Mar 201527 Jun 2017SDCmaterials, Inc.Compositions for passive NOx adsorption (PNA) systems and methods of making and using same
US971972714 Nov 20141 Aug 2017SDCmaterials, Inc.Fluid recirculation system for use in vapor phase particle production system
US973787826 Feb 201622 Aug 2017SDCmaterials, Inc.Method and system for forming plug and play metal catalysts
US20080277266 *8 May 200813 Nov 2008Layman Frederick PShape of cone and air input annulus
US20090224027 *10 Apr 200810 Sep 2009Turbine Overhaul Services Pte LtdMethod for diffusion bonding metallic components with nanoparticle foil
US20100243464 *26 Mar 200930 Sep 2010Honeywell International Inc.Methods of forming coatings on substrates
US20110144382 *15 Dec 201016 Jun 2011SDCmaterials, Inc.Advanced catalysts for fine chemical and pharmaceutical applications
US20110175025 *15 Sep 200921 Jul 2011Borgwarner Inc.Turbocharger and subassembly for bypass control in the turbine casing therefor
WO2011081834A1 *9 Dec 20107 Jul 2011Sdcmaterials LlcPinning and affixing nano-active material
Classifications
U.S. Classification428/627, 428/630, 438/695, 257/E21.249, 427/581
International ClassificationC23C28/04, C03C29/00, C23C30/00, F01D5/28, C23C16/455, B32B15/04, H01L21/311, B05D3/06, C23C16/40
Cooperative ClassificationY10T428/12576, Y10T428/12611, Y10T428/12597, Y10T428/2462, F05D2230/313, F05D2230/31, C23C28/34, C23C28/345, C23C30/00, C23C16/45525, C23C28/3215, C23C28/3455, F01D5/284, F01D5/288, C23C16/45555, C23C16/403, C23C28/42, C23C28/325, C23C28/321, C23C28/341
European ClassificationC23C16/455F2K, C23C28/345, C23C28/34, C23C28/3455, C23C28/3215, F01D5/28F, C23C16/40D, C23C30/00, F01D5/28C, C23C16/455F2