Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS20070112385 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 11/274,358
Publication date17 May 2007
Filing date15 Nov 2005
Priority date15 Nov 2005
Also published asEP1948033A1, US7815659, US7850712, US20070112383, US20070112384, WO2007059068A1
Publication number11274358, 274358, US 2007/0112385 A1, US 2007/112385 A1, US 20070112385 A1, US 20070112385A1, US 2007112385 A1, US 2007112385A1, US-A1-20070112385, US-A1-2007112385, US2007/0112385A1, US2007/112385A1, US20070112385 A1, US20070112385A1, US2007112385 A1, US2007112385A1
InventorsSean Conlon
Original AssigneeConlon Sean P
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Expandable suture anchor
US 20070112385 A1
Abstract
An expandable suture anchor is provided for use with an applicator. The suture anchor has a body formed from a biocompatible spring material such that the suture anchor has a first configuration when positioned within the applicator and a second configuration after deployment from the applicator, wherein the second configuration has a geometric shape that is broader in at least one plane than the first configuration.
Images(17)
Previous page
Next page
Claims(20)
1. An expandable suture anchor for use with an applicator, the suture anchor comprising a body formed from a biocompatible spring material such that the suture anchor has a first configuration when positioned within the applicator and a second configuration when deployed from the applicator, wherein the second configuration has a geometric shape that is broader in at least one plane than the first configuration.
2. The expandable suture anchor of claim 1, wherein the body has an approximately cylindrical shape defining a longitudinal axis when in the first configuration.
3. The expandable suture anchor of claim 2, wherein the body includes at least one leg that is springably deformable such that a portion of the leg extends further in an outwardly direction from the axis in the second configuration than in the first configuration.
4. The expandable suture anchor of claim 3, wherein the body is formed from a tubular material.
5. The expandable suture anchor of claim 2, wherein the body has a planar shape in the second configuration.
6. The expandable suture anchor of claim 5, wherein the body comprises a sheet that is configurable into a roll.
7. The expandable suture anchor of claim 5, wherein the planar shape is approximately a square shape.
8. The expandable suture anchor of claim 1, wherein the spring material includes at least one of a stainless steel, a titanium-nickel memory metal, a titanium alloy, a polymer, a cellulose material, a fabric and an absorbable polymer.
9. The expandable suture anchor of claim 1, further comprising a surgical suture connected to the body, wherein the suture extends from approximately the middle of the body when in the second configuration.
10. The expandable suture anchor of claim 9, wherein the suture is threaded through an aperture of the body and is retainably attached to the body by a knot in the suture or a ferrule crimped onto the suture.
11. The expandable suture anchor of claim 9, wherein the suture is fixedly attached to the body by gluing, welding, insert molding, deforming the body tightly onto the suture or a mechanical attachment.
12. The expandable suture anchor of claim 9, wherein the suture is formed from a conventional surgical suture.
13. The expandable suture anchor of claim 9, wherein the suture is approximately 20-200 centimeters long.
14. The expandable suture anchor of claim 1, wherein at least a portion of the suture anchor is coated with at least one of a lubricating coating, a polymeric coating, an anti-bacterial coating, a drug-releasing coating and a colored coating.
15. The expandable suture anchor of claim 1, wherein the body is formed to be normally in the expanded configuration such that the body is constrained in the first configuration when loaded within the applicator.
16. An expandable suture anchor for use with an applicator, the suture anchor comprising:
a body formed from a nickel-titanium memory material such that the suture anchor has a first configuration when positioned within the applicator and a second configuration after deployment from the applicator, wherein the second configuration has a geometric shape that is broader in at least one plane than the first configuration, and wherein the body has an approximately cylindrical shape defining a longitudinal axis when in the first configuration, and wherein the body includes at least one leg that is springably deformable such that a portion of the leg extends further in an outwardly direction from the axis in the second configuration than in the first configuration; and
a surgical suture threaded through an aperture of the body and retainably attached to the body by a knot in the suture or a ferrule crimped onto the suture to the body, wherein the suture extends from approximately the middle of the body when in the second configuration.
17. The expandable suture anchor of claim 16, wherein the suture is formed from a conventional surgical suture.
18. The expandable suture anchor of claim 17, wherein the suture is approximately 20-200 centimeters long.
19. The expandable suture anchor of claim 16, wherein at least a portion of the suture anchor is coated with at least one of a lubricating coating, a polymeric coating, an anti-bacterial coating, a drug-releasing coating and a colored coating.
20. The expandable suture anchor of claim 16, wherein the body is formed to be normally in the expanded configuration such that the body is constrained in the first configuration when loaded within the applicator.
Description
    BACKGROUND
  • [0001]
    The present application relates to surgical fasteners and instruments for approximating and fastening tissue and, more particularly, to suture anchors and associated instruments for endoscopically attaching sutures to tissue.
  • [0002]
    The working channel of a flexible endoscope typically has a diameter in the range of about 2.5 to about 4 millimeters. Current staplers and suturing devices cannot be easily redesigned to work through such small openings. In addition, performing procedures by way of the working channel does not easily permit using two instruments positioned at different angles with respect to the wound site in order to “pass and catch” a needle and apply sutures.
  • [0003]
    Various clips, suture fasteners and anchors have been developed such that physicians (e.g., gastroenterologists) may endoscopically close perforations in the gastrointestinal tract resulting from, for example, ulcers or polypectomy. One type of suture anchor is known as a “T-tag ”fastener. The T-tag is a small metallic pin with a suture attached at the middle. The physician may load the T-tag into the end of a cannulated needle of an applicator that may be inserted through the working channel of a flexible endoscope. The physician may push the needle into the tissue near the perforation and implant the T-tag into the tissue with the attached suture trailing through the working channel and out the proximal end of the endoscope. After two or more T-tags are attached to the tissue near the wound in this manner, the physician may pull the sutures to appose the tissue around the wound. The physician may then fasten the sutures together by applying a plurality of alternating, right and left overhand knots using a knot pushing device or by applying a knotting element or other type of fastener through the working channel of the endoscope.
  • [0004]
    In order for T-tags to resist pull-out from the tissue when the attached suture is tensioned, the T-tag should rotate after ejection from the cannulated needle to be approximately perpendicular to the attached suture. An issue typically associated with anchors such as the T-tag is that if the anchor is implanted within tissue layers, rather than through tissue layers such that the anchor cannot reorient as described, it is possible for the T-tag to be easily pulled from the hole created by the penetrating needle.
  • [0005]
    Another issue typically associated with current suture anchors such as the T-tag is the occasional situation in which the anchor comes out of the distal end of the cannulated needle while the applicator is manipulated into the endoscope and towards the wound site.
  • [0006]
    An issue typically associated with current suture anchor applicators is the risk that nearby organs may be accidentally injured by the needle of the applicator. The physician normally cannot see anatomical structures on the distal side of the tissue layers when the needle is being pushed through the tissue layers. Therefore, there is a risk that adjacent organs may be accidentally injured by the penetrating needle.
  • [0007]
    In addition to addressing the above issues, it may be desirable to provide an improved suture anchor that is magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) compatible. For example, the anchor may be formed from a non-ferrous material.
  • [0008]
    Accordingly, there is a need for an improved suture anchor that may be securely retained in a suture anchor applicator until deployment into the tissue near a wound. In addition, there is a need for a suture anchor with improved resistance to pull-out from tissue, whether implanted within tissue layers or through tissue layers. Furthermore, there is a need for an improved suture anchor and suture anchor applicator that helps to prevent accidental injury to nearby anatomical structures during deployment of the anchor into tissue near a wound site. Finally, there is a need for an improved suture anchor that may be formed from a non-ferrous material in order to be MRI compatible.
  • SUMMARY
  • [0009]
    In one embodiment, an expandable suture anchor is provided for use with an applicator. The suture anchor includes a body formed from a biocompatible spring material such that the suture anchor has a first configuration when positioned within the applicator and a second configuration when deployed from the applicator, wherein the second configuration has a geometric shape that is broader in at least one plane than the first configuration.
  • [0010]
    In another embodiment, an expandable suture anchor for use with an applicator includes a body formed from a nickel-titanium memory material such that the suture anchor has a first configuration when positioned within the applicator and a second configuration after deployment from the applicator. The second configuration has a geometric shape that is broader in at least one plane than the first configuration. The body has an approximately cylindrical shape defining a longitudinal axis when in the first configuration and includes at least one leg that is springably deformable such that a portion of the leg extends further in an outwardly direction from the axis in the second configuration than in the first configuration. The suture anchor also includes a surgical suture threaded through an aperture of the body and retainably attached to the body by a knot in the suture or a ferrule crimped onto the suture to the body, wherein the suture extends from approximately the middle of the body when in the second configuration.
  • [0011]
    In another embodiment, an expandable suture anchor for use with an applicator includes a body formed from a planar sheet of a nickel-titanium memory material that is configurable into a roll such that the suture anchor has a first configuration when positioned within the applicator and a second configuration after deployment from the applicator, wherein the second configuration has a geometric shape that is broader in at least one plane than the first configuration. The suture anchor also has a surgical suture threaded through an aperture of the body and retainably connected to the body by a knot in the suture or a ferrule crimped onto the suture, wherein the suture extends from approximately the middle of the body when in the second configuration.
  • [0012]
    Other aspects and embodiments of the expandable suture anchor will become apparent from the following description, the accompanying drawings and the appended claims.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0013]
    FIG. 1 is a drawing of a flexible, endoscopic portion of a gastroscope inserted into the upper gastrointestinal tract of a patient;
  • [0014]
    FIG. 2 is a drawing of the distal portion of a suture anchor applicator extending from the distal end of the gastroscope while a first suture anchor is deployed into the stomach wall near a wound;
  • [0015]
    FIG. 3 is a drawing of the applicator of FIG. 2 while a second suture anchor is deployed into the stomach wall on the opposing side of the wound;
  • [0016]
    FIG. 4 is a drawing of the applicator of FIG. 2 while a pair of sutures of the first and second suture anchors are drawn together to appose the tissue on each side of the wound;
  • [0017]
    FIG. 5 is a drawing of the pair of sutures of FIG. 4 fastened together with a knotting element, thereby holding the tissue in apposition;
  • [0018]
    FIG. 6 is a longitudinal sectional view of the distal portion of a first embodiment of a suture anchor applicator, shown while a suture anchor is in a loaded position;
  • [0019]
    FIG. 7 is a longitudinal sectional view of the applicator shown in FIG. 6, shown after the suture anchor has been deployed;
  • [0020]
    FIG. 8 is a perspective view of a first aspect of a suture anchor while in an unconstrained configuration;
  • [0021]
    FIG. 9 is a drawing of the suture anchor of FIG. 8 after placement through the tissue layers;
  • [0022]
    FIG. 10 is a perspective view of a second aspect of a suture anchor while in an unconstrained configuration;
  • [0023]
    FIG. 11 is a drawing of the suture anchor of FIG. 10 after placement within the tissue layers;
  • [0024]
    FIG. 12 is a perspective view of a third aspect of a suture anchor while in an unconstrained configuration;
  • [0025]
    FIG. 13 is a drawing of the suture anchor of FIG. 12 after placement within the tissue layers;
  • [0026]
    FIG. 14 is a perspective view of a fourth aspect of a suture anchor while in a constrained configuration;
  • [0027]
    FIG. 15 is a drawing of the suture anchor of FIG. 14 after placement through the tissue layers;
  • [0028]
    FIG. 16 is an perspective view of a fifth aspect of a suture anchor while in an unconstrained configuration;
  • [0029]
    FIG. 17 is a longitudinal sectional view of the suture anchor of FIG. 16;
  • [0030]
    FIG. 18A is a perspective view of a second embodiment of a suture anchor applicator, including a sectional view of a handle;
  • [0031]
    FIG. 18B is a perspective view of the distal portion of the applicator shown in FIG. 18A, including a tissue stop shown in an expanded configuration;
  • [0032]
    FIG. 19 is a longitudinal sectional view of the distal end of the applicator shown in FIG. 18, showing the suture anchor of FIG. 16 in a loaded position and the tissue stop in a collapsed configuration;
  • [0033]
    FIG. 20 is a longitudinal sectional view of the distal end of the applicator shown in FIG. 18, showing the suture anchor of FIG. 16 in a loaded position and the tissue stop in an expanded configuration;
  • [0034]
    FIG. 21 is a perspective view of the distal portion of a third embodiment of a suture anchor applicator, including a second aspect of a tissue stop shown in a collapsed configuration;
  • [0035]
    FIG. 22 is a perspective view of the distal portion of the applicator shown in FIG. 21, showing the tissue stop in an expanded configuration;
  • [0036]
    FIGS. 23, 24, 25, 26, 27 and 28 illustrate a method of attaching a suture anchor to the tissue of a patient, showing the distal portion of the applicator and the suture anchor of FIG. 21, wherein FIG. 23 shows positioning the distal end of the applicator containing the suture anchor near the tissue, FIG. 24 shows pushing the suture anchor against the tissue, FIG. 25 shows piercing the needle tip of the suture anchor into the tissue, FIG. 26 shows penetrating the suture anchor and the distal end of the applicator through the tissue to a predetermined maximal penetration depth, FIG. 27 shows deploying the suture anchor, and FIG. 28 shows withdrawing the applicator from the tissue such that the suture anchor is attached to the tissue; and
  • [0037]
    FIG. 29 is a perspective view of the distal portion of a fourth embodiment of a suture anchor applicator.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • [0038]
    FIG. 1 illustrates a flexible endoscopic portion 16 of a gastroscope 14 inserted into the upper gastrointestinal tract of a patient. FIGS. 2, 3, 4 and 5 illustrate a procedure for repairing a wound such as a gastric bleeding ulcer in the stomach wall of the patient via the working channel of gastroscope 14. As shown in FIG. 2, the physician (e.g., gastroenterologist) inserts a suture anchor applicator 18 through gastroscope 14 and penetrates a cannulated needle 19 through the stomach wall near the diseased area or wound. Needle 19 contains at least one suture anchor such that, as shown in FIG. 3, the physician may deploy a first suture anchor 20 attached to a first suture 24 to one side of the wound and a second suture anchor 22 attached to a second suture 26 to the opposite side of the wound. First and second suture anchors 20, 22 may be conventional “T-tag” fasteners or any of the suture anchor embodiments described herein or their equivalents. The free ends of first and second sutures 24, 26 may extend through the proximal end of gastroscope 14 such that, as shown in FIG. 4, the physician may draw the first and second sutures 24, 26 together to appose the tissue around the wound. The physician may then fasten the first and second sutures 24, 26 together by, for example, applying a plurality of alternating, right and left overhand knots using a knot pushing device (not shown) or by applying a knotting element 28 or other type of fastener, as shown in FIG. 5, by way of the working channel of gastroscope 14. Excess suture may be trimmed near the knot using an endoscopic cutting instrument.
  • [0039]
    When using conventional T-tag fasteners with the technique shown in FIGS. 2-5, there are necessary conditions for the T-tag fasteners to become securely attached to the tissue. For example, it is important that the T-tag fastener reorient with respect to the suture as previously described such that the T-tag may not be easily pulled through the tissue. If the T-tag is positioned within the tissue rather than completely through the tissue into a body cavity, the T-tag still must reorient to some degree such that the suture is securely attached to the tissue.
  • [0040]
    Although the size of the cannulated needle 19 shown in FIG. 2 may vary, it may have an inner diameter of less than one millimeter. Consequently, suture anchor 22 must be very small to be loaded inside of needle 19, yet once deployed into tissue, must be sufficiently broad to resist pull-out from tissue such that considerable tension may be applied to the sutures to draw together the tissue. Therefore, it would be desirable for suture anchor 22 to expand once deployed from the applicator and/or to include features to help secure anchor 22 to the tissue. In addition, it would be desirable for suture anchor 22 to remain securely in the loaded position within applicator 18 prior to deployment into tissue to avoid the time-consuming steps of withdrawing, reloading and reinserting the applicator.
  • [0041]
    Recently, a number of medical devices have been developed that provide an auxiliary passageway along the outside of the endoscope. One example of a medical apparatus that provides an auxiliary endoscopic passageway may be found in U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/440,957 (published as U.S. Pat. Pub. No. 2004/0230095), filed May 12, 2003, and assigned to Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. The auxiliary passageway may be used, perhaps in combination with the working channel of the endoscope, for several purposes, such as to insert a suture anchor applicator for access to an internal wound site. It should be understood, therefore, that descriptions herein referring to the working channel of the endoscope also include using such an auxiliary passageway.
  • [0042]
    FIGS. 6 and 7 are longitudinal sectional views of the distal portion of a first embodiment of a suture anchor applicator 30, which may be used in the same manner as described for applicator 18 of FIGS. 2 and 3. In FIG. 6, a first aspect of a suture anchor 52 is shown in a loaded position in applicator 30. In FIG. 7, suture anchor 52 is shown deployed from applicator 30. Applicator 30 may have a shaft .31 that includes an inner tube 40 and an outer tube 42. In a first aspect of applicator 30, shaft 31 may be adapted for insertion into the working channel of a flexible endoscope, including a gastroscope and a colonoscope, by being flexible and having an outer diameter approximately in the range of 2 to 3.8 millimeters and a length of approximately one and a half meters. In a second aspect of applicator 30, shaft 31 may be adapted for percutaneous or laparoscopic applications and be relatively rigid and straight, and may have a length approximately in the range of 20-30 centimeters.
  • [0043]
    Outer tube 42 may be formed from an extruded polymer, a helically wound metallic wire or from other materials well-known in the art. Inner tube 40 may be formed from 19 gage stainless steel hypodermic tubing, for example, having an outer diameter of approximately 0.043 inches (1.09 millimeters) and a wall thickness of approximately 0.003 inches (0.076 millimeters). The distal end of inner tube 40 may be ground to form a cannulated needle 32 having a distal, penetrating tip 34. Alternatively, inner tube 40 may be formed from an alternate type of metallic or polymeric tube and attached to cannulated needle 32, such as by welding, crimping, gluing or other conventional method.
  • [0044]
    Penetrating tip 34 may be ground to have a “bi-angular” configuration as shown in FIG. 6. To facilitate placement of the suture anchor into the body, the outer surface of needle 32 may be textured, coated or otherwise processed to enhance the ultrasonic reflectivity of needle 32 such that the physician may view needle 32 from outside of the patient's body using, for example, a handheld ultrasonic imaging device.
  • [0045]
    Inner tube 40 and needle 32 may include a channel 36 extending along a longitudinal axis 50 between the proximal and distal ends of applicator 30. At least one suture anchor 46 having a suture 48 attached thereto may be loaded in channel 36. An actuating element 38 may extend through channel 36 of applicator 30 for ejecting suture anchor 52 out of needle 32, as shown in FIG. 7.
  • [0046]
    Outer tube 31 may be moved between an extended position for shielding tip 34 of needle 32 (FIG. 6) and a retracted position for exposing tip 34 of needle 32 (FIG. 7). Shaft 31 may be inserted into the working channel or auxiliary passageway of the endoscope with suture 48 trailing in the diametral clearance between shaft 31 and the inside of the working channel or passageway, such that the free end of suture 48 may extend out of the proximal end of the channel or passageway.
  • [0000]
    Expandable Suture Anchor
  • [0047]
    Numerous aspects of an expandable suture anchor are described herein. In general, the expandable suture anchor may be used for attaching a suture to any one of numerous soft tissues, including the wall of the gastrointestinal tract. The anchor may include a suture attached thereto and a body that is constrainable to a first configuration for deployment into the tissue and that is expandable when unconstrained to a second configuration for resisting pull-out from the tissue.
  • [0048]
    FIG. 8 is a perspective view of the first aspect of the suture anchor 52 shown with applicator 30 in FIG. 6. FIG. 9 shows anchor 52 after placement through tissue layers such as the stomach wall. Anchor 52 may include a body 56 having a bifurcated portion 58 along an anchor axis 64 and forming a pair of legs 60. Bifurcated portion 58 may include an angled portion 59 that splays away from axis 64. Angled portion 59 has a length indicated by “L1” that may vary, for example, between approximately one eighth and one quarter of the overall length of anchor 52. Anchor 52 may have a first configuration when constrained in the loaded position in needle 32 (see FIG. 6) and a second configuration when unconstrained as shown in FIG. 8. Anchor 52 may have a relatively short, angled portion 59 as depicted in FIG. 8 to help retain anchor 52 securely inside of needle 32 until deployment of anchor 52 into tissue. Anchor 52 may be positioned inside of channel 36 of needle 32 such that legs 60 bear against the inside of channel 36, causing body 56 to bow as shown in FIG. 6.
  • [0049]
    Anchor 52 may be formed from a biocompatible, spring material such as a stainless steel, a titanium alloy, a nickel-titanium memory metal (Nitinol), a polymer, or an absorbable polymer. Spring material shall be referred to herein as a material such that, a suture anchor formed from the spring material is biased to springably change from the first to the second configuration when not constrained.
  • [0050]
    Suture 54 and all the sutures described herein may be a surgical suture formed from convention surgical suture materials including, for example, cat gut, polypropylene, polyester and stainless steel. The suture size may be any one of the commonly used sizes for surgical procedures, including 2/0, 3/0 and 4/0 sutures.
  • [0051]
    As shown in FIG. 8, anchor 52 may include a bore 66. A suture 54 may be attached to anchor 52 by passing suture 54 through bore 66 and tying a knot 62 that is larger than bore 66. Alternately, a ferrule 47 (see FIG. 7) may be crimped onto suture 54. It is also possible to crimp or stake body 56 onto suture 54 at the end opposite of legs 60. Suture 54 may also be glued or mechanically attached to anchor 52, or by any one of numerous other conventional methods.
  • [0052]
    Suture 54 may extend from the middle portion of anchor 52 such that when suture 54 is drawn tightly after placement of anchor 52 through layers of tissue, anchor 52 reorients such that axis 64 is approximately perpendicular to suture 54 extending from the wound site, thereby providing a high resistance to pull-out from the tissue. If anchor 52 is positioned within tissue rather than in a body cavity, legs 60 also function to dig into the tissue when a tensile force is applied to suture 54, thereby helping anchor 52 reorient within the tissue such that suture 54 is securely attached to the tissue. The lengths L1 of legs 60 and the angles formed by legs 60 relative to axis 64 may be selected such that tissue retention forces are asymmetric when a tensile force is applied to suture 54, thereby helping anchor 52 to reorient within the tissue and increase the pull-out resistance.
  • [0053]
    In one aspect, the diameter of anchor 52 may be approximately 0.50 to 0.85 millimeters, or small enough to slide easily, for example, into a 19 gage, cannulated needle. The overall length of anchor 52 may be, but is not limited to, approximately five to 10 millimeters.
  • [0054]
    FIG. 10 is a perspective view of a second aspect of a suture anchor 68. FIG. 11 shows anchor 68 after placement in the tissue layers. Anchor 68 has a first configuration when constrained in the loaded position inside of needle 32 of applicator 30 (FIG. 6) and a second configuration when unconstrained, as shown in FIGS. 10 and 11. The second configuration is broader in at least one plane than the first configuration. Anchor 68 may have at least one leg 80 splayed at an angle or extending outwardly relative to a longitudinal axis 84. As shown in FIG. 10, anchor 68 may include a body 74 having a bifurcated portion 76 forming a pair of legs 80. Anchor 68 may also have a plurality of legs. For example, anchor 68 may have a large plurality of very slender legs formed from stiff filaments and joined together in a “broom-like” fashion. In the latter situation, the plurality of legs may provide a scaffold for tissue ingrowth, which is beneficial for further securing anchor 68 to the tissue.
  • [0055]
    Anchor 68 is similar to anchor 52 of FIG. 8, except that an angled portion 82 of anchor 68 is longer, as indicated by “L2”, than angled portion 59 of anchor 52. Length L2 may be, for example, approximately one quarter to one half of the overall length of anchor 68. Anchor 68 may be formed from the same biocompatible, spring materials as described for anchor 52. A suture 70 may be attached to anchor 68 by a knot 72, a crimped ferrule, glue or any one of numerous other conventional methods.
  • [0056]
    Anchor 68 provides a high pull-out resistance from tissue when deployed either through tissue layers or within tissue layers. In the former, anchor 68 may orient itself to be approximately perpendicular to suture 70. In the latter, legs 80 of anchor 68 act like barbs and may dig into surrounding tissue. In addition, the spring-back of legs 80 helps to hold anchor 68 securely inside of needle 32 of applicator 30 (FIG. 6).
  • [0057]
    FIG. 12 shows a third aspect of a suture anchor 86 in an unconstrained, second configuration. FIG. 13 shows anchor 86 also in the second configuration, after placement within stomach wall 12. Anchor 86 has a constrained, first configuration when in the loaded position in needle 32 of applicator 30 (FIG. 6). Anchor 86 is a new adaptation of a surgical clip concept disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 6,447,524, which is titled “Fastener for Hernia Mesh Fixation,” issued to Knodel et al. on Sep. 10, 2002 and assigned to Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Anchor 86 may be formed from a titanium-nickel memory metal (Nitinol), a stainless steel, a titanium alloy, or any one of a number of spring materials. Anchor 86 may include a body 88 having a bifurcation 92 to form a pair of legs 90 that splay or extend outwardly from an anchor axis 100. A suture 96 may be retained in a hole 94 in body 88 by a knot 98. When in the loaded position inside of needle 32 of applicator 30 (FIG. 6), legs 90 may extend in the distal direction. Like anchor 68 of FIG. 10, anchor 86 may provide a high pull-out resistance from tissue when placed both through and within tissue layers.
  • [0058]
    FIG. 14 illustrates a fourth aspect of a suture anchor 102 while in a first configuration, such as when constrained in a loaded position in needle 32 of applicator 30 (FIG. 6). FIG. 15 shows anchor 102 placed through stomach wall 12, unconstrained and in a second configuration. Anchor 102 has a body 108 that may be formed from a spring material such as stainless steel, titanium alloy, a polymer or a memory metal (Nitinol) into a thin sheet, flat or plate that may be rolled into the approximately cylindrical shape of the first configuration. When unconstrained in the second configuration, anchor 102 may have a relatively large planar surface area as compared to the projected area of anchor 102 while in the first configuration, thereby providing a very high pull-out resistance from tissue when placed through tissue layers as shown in FIG. 15. Body 108 may have a rectangular shape with side dimensions of approximately 5 to 10 millimeters, although body 108 may have any one of many other geometric shapes. Body 108 may be sufficiently thick to attach securely to suture 104 and to resist excessive deformation during normal tensioning of suture 104. Body 108 may be formed from a sheet of Nitinol, for example, that has a thickness of about 0.05 to 0.2 millimeters.
  • [0059]
    Anchor 102 may include a suture 104 retained through a hole (hidden) by a knot 106. Alternately, suture 104 may be attached to anchor 102 by gluing, crimping or any one of a number of well known methods.
  • [0000]
    Self-Shielding Suture Anchor
  • [0060]
    As already described, a physician may fully penetrate the needle of a suture anchor applicator through tissue layers of an organ in order to deploy the suture anchor on the distal side of the tissue layers. The physician normally cannot see anatomical structures on the distal side of the tissue layers through the endoscope and therefore may accidentally injure nearby organs with the penetrating needle. A fifth aspect of a suture anchor 110, a “self-shielding” suture anchor, is provided to help prevent such accidental injury.
  • [0061]
    FIG. 16 is a perspective view and FIG. 17 is a longitudinal sectional view of anchor 110, which includes a body 112 having a penetrating tip 114, a shielding element 116 and a spring element 118. Shielding element 116 may be retained in body 112 and may have a blunt end 120 that is movable between a shielding position that is distal to penetrating tip 114 and a retracted position that is proximal to penetrating tip 114. FIGS. 16 and 17 show shielding element 116 in the shielding position. Spring element 118 (FIG. 17) may be operatively associated with penetrating element 114 and shielding element 116, such that spring element 118 may apply a predetermined spring force to bias shielding element 116 to the shielding position. Shielding element 116 can move to the retracted position when blunt end 120 is pushed against tissue with a force greater than the spring force, such that penetrating tip 114 can penetrate tissue. Once penetrating tip 114 has penetrated through the tissue, blunt end 120 can immediately extend to the shielding position to help prevent accidental injury to nearby anatomical structures.
  • [0062]
    Still referring to FIGS. 16 and 17, body 112 may be formed into a tubular shape from a stainless steel, titanium alloy, or other biocompatible metal. The outside diameter of body 112 may be approximately in the range of 0.5 to 0.85 millimeters and the length may be approximately in the range of 10 to 15 millimeters. Spring element 118 may be a metallic coil compression spring that inserts easily into body 112 or spring element 118 may be formed from any one of numerous other biocompatible materials that can provide a spring force to bias shielding element 116 to be in the shielding position. Shielding element 116 may have a cylindrical, bullet shape that slides easily in body 112 and may be formed from a biocompatible metal or polymer. Body 112 of anchor 110 may include a slot 122 extending longitudinally from penetrating tip 114 to approximately halfway between tip 114 and a trailing end 130 of body 112. A suture 128 may pass through slot 122, a passage 124 of shielding element 116 and the coils of spring element 118, and may be attached to trailing end 126 by a knot 130 or by any one of numerous other suitable methods including gluing, crimping and staking. This attachment method of suture 128 also may function to retain shielding element 116 and spring element 118 inside of body 112.
  • [0063]
    Since anchor 110 includes a penetrating tip 114, it is not necessary for the applicator of anchor 110 to also include a needle with a penetrating tip. For example, needle 32 of applicator 30 in FIG. 6 may be replaced with a short tube attached to inner tube 40, or inner tube 40 may merely be lengthened and adapted for retaining anchor 110 in a loaded position. Applicator 30 of FIG. 6 may be further modified for use with anchor 110 by eliminating outer tube 42, which has a primary finction of shielding the penetrating tip of the needle.
  • [0064]
    Anchor 110 is an exemplary embodiment of a self-shielding anchor. Those skilled in the art will appreciate that numerous other embodiments are possible, including a self-shielding anchor that is unitarily formed from a biocompatible material by an injection molding process.
  • [0065]
    All of the suture anchor aspects described herein and their equivalents, may be subjected to a secondary manufacturing process such as tumbling, bead blasting or electropolishing to remove sharp burrs or edges that may injure tissue or inhibit proper deployment into tissue. In addition, all of the suture anchor aspects may be coated with a second material in order to provide desirable properties that may facilitate the deployment of the anchor and/or improve the surgical outcome. For example, the suture anchor may be coated with a lubricious coating, a polymeric coating, a drug-releasing coating, an anti-bacterial coating or a colored coating to facilitate identification.
  • [0000]
    Suture Anchor Applicator
  • [0066]
    FIG. 18A is a perspective view of a second embodiment of a suture anchor applicator (also referred to as a medical instrument), generally designated 200, that is adapted to help prevent injury to nearby anatomical structures while deploying a suture anchor. FIG. 18B is a perspective view of the distal portion of applicator 200, shown with suture anchor 110 of FIG. 16. Applicator 200 may include an elongated shaft 204 attached to a handle 202. Applicator 200 may be similar to applicator 30 of FIG. 6. However, applicator 200 may also include a tissue stop 206 near the distal end of shaft 204. Tissue stop 206 can function to control the penetration depth of the distal end of the instrument into tissue to help prevent accidental injury to tissue/organs on the distal, “blind” side of the tissue being intentionally penetrated. Tissue stop 206 may also provide a visual indication of the needle penetration depth, as viewed through the endoscope. Applicator 200 is described next as it may be adapted for use with suture anchor 110 of FIG. 16, although applicator 200 may also be adapted for use with many types of suture anchors, including any of the suture anchor aspects described herein and their equivalents.
  • [0067]
    As may be seen in FIG. 18A, handle 202 may include a first actuator 208, a second actuator 210 and a third actuator 212. A physician may operate first actuator 208 to set the distance between the distal end of applicator 200 and tissue stop 206, thereby helping to control the penetration depth of the distal end into tissue. A physician may operate second actuator 210 to change tissue stop 206 between a collapsed and an expanded configuration. A physician may operate third actuator 212 to deploy suture anchor 110 into tissue, thereby attaching suture 128 to the tissue.
  • [0068]
    FIG. 18B shows tissue stop 206 in the expanded configuration. FIGS. 19 and 20 are longitudinal sectional views of the distal portion of applicator 200. FIG. 19 shows tissue stop 206 in the collapsed configuration and FIG. 20 shows tissue stop 206 in the expanded configuration. The distal and proximal ends of shaft 204 define a longitudinal axis 240. Axis 240 may be curvilinear if shaft 204 is adapted for use with a flexible endoscope. Shaft 204 may include an inner tube 228 having a channel 229 extending therethrough and slidably retaining an actuating element 226. The proximal end of inner tube 228 may be attached to handle 202. The proximal end of actuating element 110 may be operatively connected to third actuator 212 of handle 202. The distal end of actuating element 226 may be operatively engaged with anchor 110, which is shown positioned inside channel 229 in a loaded position and partially extending from a tapered distal end 230 of inner tube 228. Suture 128 may be draped alongside shaft 204 for insertion into the working channel of a flexible endoscope. When a physician operates third actuator 212, actuating element 226 may forcibly eject suture anchor 110 from inner tube 226.
  • [0069]
    An intermediate tube 222 may be movably and coaxially retained over inner tube 228. The distal end of intermediate tube 222 may include a radial flange 224. The proximal end of intermediate tube 222 may be operatively engaged to first actuator 208. The physician may operate first actuator 208 to move intermediate tube 222 between an extended position, in which flange 224 is distal to penetrating tip 114 of anchor 110, and a retracted position, in which flange 224 is proximal to tapered end 230 of inner tube 228. First actuator 208 may be provided with calibrations or a visual indicator such that the physician may position and hold intermediate tube 222 in any longitudinal position between the extended and retracted positions and know the maximum penetration depth of inner tube 228.
  • [0070]
    Still referring to FIGS. 19 and 20, an outer tube 214 (also referred to as a force element) may be movably and coaxially retained over intermediate tube 222. The proximal end of outer tube 214 may be operatively connected to second actuator 210. The distal end of outer tube 214 may be attached or unitarily formed with a proximal stop ring 220 of tissue stop 206, which may also be coaxially retained on intermediate tube 222.
  • [0071]
    Tissue stop 206 may be formed such as by injection molding from a biocompatible polymer or metal. Tissue stop 206 may include at least one arm 216 that is approximately parallel to the longitudinal axis 240 when tissue stop 206 is in the collapsed configuration for easy passage through the working channel of an endoscope. Arm 216 may extend outwardly from longitudinal axis 240 when tissue stop 206 is in the expanded configuration, such that only the portion of applicator 200 distal to tissue stop 206 may penetrate tissue. As shown in FIG. 18B, tissue stop 206 may have four arms 216 positioned around axis 240. The distal end of each arm may be attached to a distal stop ring 218 and the proximal end of each arm may be attached to the proximal stop ring 220. Distal stop ring 218 may be fixed to intermediate tube 222 and proximal stop ring 220 may be slidably retained on intermediate tube 222 between flange 224 and outer tube 214. When the physician moves second actuator 210 in the distal direction, outer tube 214 can force tissue stop 206 against flange 224 and cause arms 216 to buckle as shown in FIG. 24 into the expanded configuration. The physician may move second actuator 210 proximally to change tissue stop 206 back to the collapsed configuration in order to remove applicator 200 from the endoscope.
  • [0072]
    It would also be possible for proximal stop ring 220 to be fixed to intermediate tube 222 and distal stop ring 218 to be slidably retained on intermediate tube 222. Instead of outer tube 214, another type of force element, such as a wire (not shown) may be connected to distal ring 218 and extended through channel 229 to handle 200. The proximal end of the wire force element could be connected to second actuator 210. The physician could then move second actuator 210 in the proximal direction to change tissue stop 206 from the collapsed to the expanded configuration.
  • [0073]
    The longitudinal position of flange 224 may set a distance “D2” (FIG. 24) between tissue stop 206 and tapered distal end 230. Penetrating tip 114 of anchor 110 may extend a distance “D1” distal to tapered distal tip 230. A maximum penetration depth of tip 114, therefore, is approximately equal to D1+D2, which may be visually indicated by calibrations (not shown) on first actuator 208.
  • [0074]
    An alternate embodiment of applicator 200 may include a tissue stop that is formed from a spring material such that the tissue stop is in the expanded configuration when unconstrained. In such an alternate embodiment, the tissue stop may be attached to the distal end of an intermediate tube that the physician may move to any longitudinal position between an extended and a retracted position. An outer sheath may be provided on the shaft of the applicator such that the physician may move the sheath distally to slide over and collapse the tissue stop and may move the sheath proximally to uncover the tissue stop and allow it to expand. Calibrations may be provided on the actuator such that the physician can know the maximal penetration depth of the tip.
  • [0075]
    FIG. 21 is a perspective view of the distal portion of a third embodiment of a suture anchor applicator, generally designated 300, and showing anchor 110 (FIG. 16) having suture 128 in a loaded position in the distal end of an inner tube 322 of a shaft 304. Applicator 300 may include a tissue stop 306 that is shown in a collapsed configuration in FIG. 21 and in an expanded configuration in FIG. 22. Tissue stop 306 may have a pair of arms 316 that may be unitarily formed with a polymeric sheath 314 covering inner tube 322. Arms 316 may be formed to be in the expanded configuration when unconstrained, such that it is necessary for the user to collapse arms 316 as the distal end of applicator 300 is inserted into the proximal opening of the working channel or auxiliary passageway of the endoscope. When tissue stop 306 emerges from the distal opening of the working channel of the endoscope, arms 316 automatically spring outwardly, at least partially. When the physician advances applicator 300 in the distal direction such that tissue stop 306 bears against the tissue being penetrated by anchor 110 and inner tube 322, arms 316 further expand (if not already fully expanded) to the expanded configuration, thereby setting a maximum penetration depth of anchor 110 and inner tube 322 into the tissue. Withdrawal of applicator 300 through the working channel of the endoscope forces tissue stop 306 back into the collapsed configuration. Therefore, an outer sheath, such as sheath 214 of applicator 200 shown in FIG. 18B, is not required for applicator 300 in FIG. 21 to change tissue stop 306 between the collapsed and expanded configurations.
  • [0076]
    FIGS. 23-28 illustrate applicator 300 of FIG. 21 being used to attach anchor 110 to the tissue of a patient. For clarity, the endoscope used to provide access and visualization to the tissue is not shown, but it should be understood that the distal end of the endoscope may also be near and directed towards the tissue to be penetrated by anchor 110.
  • [0077]
    In FIG. 23, the distal end of applicator 300 containing anchor 110 is positioned near the tissue layers (e.g., stomach wall). Tissue stop 306 is shown in the collapsed configuration, as it would be when positioned inside of the working channel of the endoscope. FIG. 24 shows shielding element 116 partially retracted and penetrating tip 114 of anchor 110 beginning to pierce into the tissue as the user slowly pushes on the proximal end of applicator 300. FIG. 25 shows shielding element 116 fully retracted into anchor 110 as penetrating tip 114 penetrates the tissue layers. FIG. 26 shows anchor 110 and the distal end of inner tube 322 penetrated through the tissue layers and entering the body cavity distal to the penetrated tissue layers. Tissue stop 306 is shown as it is pushed against the tissue layers and in the fully expanded configuration, thereby limiting the maximal penetration depth of anchor 110 and inner tube 322. Suture 128 is shown trailing proximally through the tissue opening created by penetrating tip 114. FIG. 27 shows anchor 110 deployed into the body cavity distal to the penetrated tissue layers and reorienting to resist pull-out from the tissue layers when a tensile force is applied to suture 128. FIG. 28 shows anchor 110 being drawn against the distal side of the penetrated tissue layers as a tensile force is lightly applied to suture 128. FIG. 28 also shows applicator 300 withdrawn from the tissue and into the working channel, thereby forcing tissue stop 306 to change to the collapsed configuration for removal from the endoscope.
  • [0078]
    A method of endoscopically attaching a suture anchor to the tissue of a patient may include the following: A suture anchor applicator wherein the applicator includes a tissue stop movable between a collapsed and an expanded configuration and the applicator contains a suture anchor in a loaded position. The endoscopic portion of an endoscope is positioned in the patient to provide access and visualization of a wound in the tissue. While the tissue stop is in the collapsed configuration, the shaft of the applicator is introduced into the working channel of the endoscope. The distal end of the applicator is positioned near the tissue and the tissue stop is changed to the expanded configuration. The applicator is advanced distally such that the anchor and the distal end of the applicator penetrates into the tissue to approximately a maximal penetration depth as determined by the location of the tissue stop on the shaft of the applicator. The applicator is remotely actuated to deploy the suture anchor into the tissue, thereby attaching the suture anchor to the tissue with the suture attached thereto and extending through the penetrated tissue and the work channel. The applicator is withdrawn proximally through the working channel and removed from the endoscope.
  • [0079]
    FIG. 29 is a perspective view of the distal portion of a fourth embodiment of a suture anchor applicator, generally designated 400, and also referred to as a medical instrument. Applicator 400 may include a tissue stop 406 (shown in an expanded configuration) having a pair of arms 408 that may be unitarily formed with a polymeric sheath 402 covering an inner tube 410. A sharp, penetrating tip 412 may be ground onto the distal end of inner tube 410 such that applicator 400 may be used with any of the suture anchors described herein. Arms 408 may be formed to be in the expanded configuration when unconstrained such that it is necessary for the user to collapse arms 408 as the distal end of applicator 400 is inserted into the proximal opening of the working channel of the endoscope. When tissue stop 406 emerges from the distal opening of the working channel of the endoscope, arms 408 automatically spring outwardly, at least partially. When the physician advances applicator 400 in the distal direction such that a distal end 414 of tissue stop 406 bears against the tissue being penetrated by inner tube 410, arms 408 may further expand (if not already fully expanded) to the expanded configuration, thereby setting a maximum penetration depth of inner tube 410 into the tissue. Withdrawal of applicator 400 through the working channel of the endoscope forces tissue stop 406 back into the collapsed configuration.
  • [0080]
    The proximal end of sheath 402 may be operatively connected to a control on a handle (not shown) such that the longitudinal position of sheath 402 relative to inner tube 410 may be adjustable by the user. Using this control, distal end 414 may be extended to a position distal to penetrating tip 412 while the distal end of applicator 400 is advanced to the wound site and retracted to a position proximal to tip 412 when it is desired to penetrate tissue. Calibrations and/or a visual indicator may be provided on the handle to indicate the position of distal end 414 such that the user may know the approximate penetration depth of inner tube 410 into the tissue.
  • [0081]
    Although various aspects of expandable suture anchors, self-shielding suture anchors, suture anchor applicators and methods have been shown and described, it should be understood that modifications may occur to those skilled in the art.
Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US62329 *26 Feb 1867 Op lisb on
US2069878 *7 May 19359 Feb 1937Dennison Mfg CoAttaching means
US3890970 *21 Jan 197424 Jun 1975Gullen Robert LRetention cannula or catheter and applicator
US4006747 *23 Apr 19758 Feb 1977Ethicon, Inc.Surgical method
US4022191 *4 Jun 197610 May 1977Khosrow JamshidiBiopsy needle guard and guide
US4275717 *27 Jul 197930 Jun 1981Zimmer Usa, Inc.Intramedullary fixation device for fractured tubular bones
US4393872 *27 May 198019 Jul 1983Eder Instrument Co., Inc.Aspirating surgical forceps
US4741330 *4 Apr 19863 May 1988Hayhurst John OMethod and apparatus for anchoring and manipulating cartilage
US4851005 *15 Jul 198825 Jul 1989South African Invention Development CorporationSurgical implant
US4901721 *2 Aug 198820 Feb 1990Hakki Samir ISuturing device
US5080543 *5 Nov 199014 Jan 1992Engineered Construction Components (America) Inc.Fastening sleeves and fastening systems employing same
US5080663 *26 Sep 199014 Jan 1992Univerity College LondonSewing device
US5081997 *20 Jul 198921 Jan 1992Vance Products IncorporatedEchogenic devices, material and method
US5084050 *2 Oct 198928 Jan 1992Klaus DraenertImplant for bone reinforcement and for anchoring bone screws, implants and implant parts
US5104382 *15 Jan 199114 Apr 1992Ethicon, Inc.Trocar
US5123914 *19 May 198623 Jun 1992Cook IncorporatedVisceral anchor for visceral wall mobilization
US5197971 *18 Dec 199030 Mar 1993Bonutti Peter MArthroscopic retractor and method of using the same
US5217486 *18 Feb 19928 Jun 1993Mitek Surgical Products, Inc.Suture anchor and installation tool
US5282832 *9 Oct 19921 Feb 1994United States Surgical CorporationSuture clip
US5312435 *17 May 199317 May 1994Kensey Nash CorporationFail predictable, reinforced anchor for hemostatic puncture closure
US5383905 *9 Oct 199224 Jan 1995United States Surgical CorporationSuture loop locking device
US5405354 *6 Aug 199311 Apr 1995Vance Products Inc.Suture driver
US5480403 *28 Oct 19942 Jan 1996United States Surgical CorporationSuture anchoring device and method
US5486197 *24 Mar 199423 Jan 1996Ethicon, Inc.Two-piece suture anchor with barbs
US5514159 *13 Sep 19947 May 1996United States Surgical CorporationGuillotine suture clip
US5527342 *14 Dec 199318 Jun 1996Pietrzak; William S.Method and apparatus for securing soft tissues, tendons and ligaments to bone
US5591206 *30 Sep 19937 Jan 1997Moufarr+E,Gra E+Ee Ge; RichardMethod and device for closing wounds
US5593422 *6 Jan 199514 Jan 1997Muijs Van De Moer; Wouter M.Occlusion assembly for sealing openings in blood vessels and a method for sealing openings in blood vessels
US5601557 *12 Jun 199111 Feb 1997Hayhurst; John O.Anchoring and manipulating tissue
US5626614 *22 Dec 19956 May 1997Applied Medical Resources CorporationT-anchor suturing device and method for using same
US5630824 *1 Jun 199420 May 1997Innovasive Devices, Inc.Suture attachment device
US5643321 *7 Dec 19951 Jul 1997Innovasive DevicesSuture anchor assembly and methods
US5645589 *22 Aug 19948 Jul 1997Li Medical Technologies, Inc.Anchor and method for securement into a bore
US5647874 *7 Jun 199515 Jul 1997John O. HayhurstAnchoring and manipulating tissue
US5649963 *10 Nov 199422 Jul 1997Innovasive Devices, Inc.Suture anchor assembly and methods
US5707395 *16 Jan 199713 Jan 1998Li Medical Technologies, Inc.Surgical fastener and method and apparatus for ligament repair
US5728114 *7 Mar 199617 Mar 1998Kensey Nash CorporationApparatus and methods of use for preventing blood seepage at a percutaneous puncture site
US5728136 *15 Jul 199617 Mar 1998Thal; RaymondKnotless suture anchor assembly
US5733306 *21 Jun 199631 Mar 1998Bonutti; Peter M.Method and apparatus for anchoring a suture
US5755730 *23 Mar 199526 May 1998University College LondonDevice for use in cutting threads
US5782864 *3 Apr 199721 Jul 1998Mitek Surgical Products, Inc.Knotless suture system and method
US5891168 *1 Oct 19976 Apr 1999Thal; RaymondProcess for attaching tissue to bone using a captured-loop knotless suture anchor assembly
US5893856 *12 Jun 199613 Apr 1999Mitek Surgical Products, Inc.Apparatus and method for binding a first layer of material to a second layer of material
US5899921 *25 Jul 19974 May 1999Innovasive Devices, Inc.Connector device and method for surgically joining and securing flexible tissue repair members
US5902321 *25 Jul 199711 May 1999Innovasive Devices, Inc.Device and method for delivering a connector for surgically joining and securing flexible tissue repair members
US5904696 *4 Nov 199718 May 1999Ethicon, Inc.Spiral surgical tack
US5916236 *7 Jan 199729 Jun 1999Kensey Nash CorporationOcclusion assembly for sealing openings in blood vessels and a method for sealing openings in blood vessels
US6036694 *3 Aug 199814 Mar 2000Innovasive Devices, Inc.Self-tensioning soft tissue fixation device and method
US6036701 *11 Mar 199714 Mar 2000Ethicon, Inc.Spiral surgical tack
US6066146 *24 Jun 199823 May 2000Carroll; Brendan J.Laparascopic incision closure device
US6068648 *26 Jan 199830 May 2000Orthodyne, Inc.Tissue anchoring system and method
US6086608 *14 Jan 199711 Jul 2000Smith & Nephew, Inc.Suture collet
US6214031 *5 Jun 200010 Apr 2001Arthrex, Inc.Corkscrew suture anchor
US6245080 *22 Sep 200012 Jun 2001Scion Cardio-Vascular, Inc.Suture with toggle and delivery system
US6338738 *31 Aug 199915 Jan 2002Edwards Lifesciences Corp.Device and method for stabilizing cardiac tissue
US6387114 *27 Mar 200114 May 2002Scimed Life Systems, Inc.Gastrointestinal compression clips
US6506190 *17 Nov 200014 Jan 2003Christopher J. WalsheTissue anchor system
US6524328 *12 Apr 200125 Feb 2003Scion International, Inc.Suture lock, lock applicator and method therefor
US6527794 *10 Aug 19994 Mar 2003Ethicon, Inc.Self-locking suture anchor
US6561969 *4 Apr 200113 May 2003Ev3 Inc.Method of reducing the volume of the heart
US6569167 *4 Nov 199827 May 2003Walter P. BobechkoMethod, apparatus and assembly for terminating bleeding from a bone
US6575984 *27 Dec 200110 Jun 2003Ams Research CorporationMedical sling procedures and anchor insertion methods and devices
US6575987 *2 May 200110 Jun 2003Scimed Life Systems, Inc.Quick connect bone suture fastener
US6575998 *27 Dec 200110 Jun 2003Ams Research CorporationMedical sling procedures and anchor insertion methods and devices
US6689153 *14 Apr 200010 Feb 2004Orthopaedic Biosystems Ltd, Inc.Methods and apparatus for a coated anchoring device and/or suture
US6692516 *26 Nov 200117 Feb 2004Linvatec CorporationKnotless suture anchor and method for knotlessly securing tissue
US6699263 *5 Apr 20022 Mar 2004Cook IncorporatedSliding suture anchor
US6712804 *13 Jul 200130 Mar 2004Ev3 Sunnyvale, Inc.Method of closing an opening in a wall of the heart
US6730110 *6 Jan 20004 May 2004Ams Research CorporationTack device
US6730112 *15 Jun 20014 May 2004Scion Cardio-Vascular, Inc.Suture with toggle and delivery system
US6746472 *11 Jul 20018 Jun 2004Ev3 Sunnyvale, Inc.Endoluminal anchor
US6749620 *25 Mar 200215 Jun 2004Edwin C. BartlettApparatus and method for anchoring sutures
US6846313 *22 Sep 200025 Jan 2005Codman & Shurtleff, Inc.One-piece biocompatible absorbable rivet and pin for use in surgical procedures
US6860895 *18 Jun 19991 Mar 2005Radi Medical Systems AbTool, a sealing device, a system and a method for closing a wound
US7390329 *14 Jan 200524 Jun 2008Usgi Medical, Inc.Methods for grasping and cinching tissue anchors
US7651509 *16 Aug 200426 Jan 2010Smith & Nephew, Inc.Methods and devices for tissue repair
US20010010008 *12 Mar 200126 Jul 2001Gellman Barry N.Protective sheath for transvaginal anchor implantation device
US20020059938 *22 Aug 200123 May 2002Fogarty Thomas J.Device for accurately marking tissue
US20020077631 *3 Oct 200120 Jun 2002Lubbers Lawrence M.Apparatus and methods for tendon or ligament repair
US20020082622 *5 Dec 200127 Jun 2002Kane David LeeCollapsed deployable soft tissue anchor for repairing soft tissue to bone
US20030018358 *3 Jul 200223 Jan 2003Vahid SaadatApparatus and methods for treating tissue
US20030023268 *29 Jul 200230 Jan 2003Lizardi Jose E.Suture anchor system and method of use
US20030093117 *4 Nov 200215 May 2003Vahid SaadatImplantable artificial partition and methods of use
US20030097150 *21 Nov 200122 May 2003Medicinelodge, Inc.Suture anchor
US20030109900 *13 Sep 200112 Jun 2003Jonathan MartinekKnotless tissue anchor
US20040049194 *8 Sep 200311 Mar 2004Smith & Nephew, A Massachusetts CorporationSurgical procedures and instruments
US20040049211 *12 Jun 200311 Mar 2004Mitral Interventions, Inc.Method and apparatus for tissue connection
US20040092969 *26 Sep 200213 May 2004Kumar Sarbjeet S.Device and method for surgical repair of abdominal wall hernias
US20040093023 *24 Apr 200313 May 2004Allen William J.Minimally invasive mitral valve repair method and apparatus
US20040098050 *19 Nov 200220 May 2004Opus Medical, Inc.Devices and methods for repairing soft tissue
US20040116949 *11 Aug 200317 Jun 2004Ewers Richard C.Apparatus and methods for forming gastrointestinal tissue approximations
US20040122456 *1 Jul 200324 Jun 2004Saadat Vahid C.Methods and apparatus for gastric reduction
US20040122473 *1 Jul 200324 Jun 2004Ewers Richard C.Delivery systems and methods for gastric reduction
US20050033319 *17 May 200410 Feb 2005Gambale Richard A.Single intubation, multi-stitch endoscopic suturing system
US20050055052 *9 Sep 200410 Mar 2005Linvatec CorporationKnotless suture anchor
US20050075654 *4 Oct 20047 Apr 2005Brian KelleherMethods and devices for soft tissue securement
US20050113851 *16 Nov 200426 May 2005Swain Christopher P.Device for transfixing and joining tissue
US20050143762 *15 Sep 200430 Jun 2005Paraschac Joseph F.Suture locking device and methods
US20060030884 *5 Aug 20049 Feb 2006Yeung Jeffrey ESuture anchor and approximating device
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US764528612 Jan 2010Neotract, Inc.Devices, systems and methods for retracting, lifting, compressing, supporting or repositioning tissues or anatomical structures
US765500415 Feb 20072 Feb 2010Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Electroporation ablation apparatus, system, and method
US775859420 May 200520 Jul 2010Neotract, Inc.Devices, systems and methods for treating benign prostatic hyperplasia and other conditions
US775859819 May 200620 Jul 2010Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Combination knotting element and suture anchor applicator
US77669233 Aug 2010Neotract, Inc.Integrated handle assembly for anchor delivery system
US77806823 Aug 200724 Aug 2010Neotract, Inc.Apparatus and method for manipulating or retracting tissue and anatomical structure
US781565519 Oct 2010Neotract, Inc.Devices, systems and methods for retracting, lifting, compressing, supporting or repositioning tissues or anatomical structures
US78156628 Mar 200719 Oct 2010Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical suture anchors and deployment device
US785071215 Nov 200514 Dec 2010Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Self-shielding suture anchor
US789689124 Jul 20061 Mar 2011Neotract, Inc.Apparatus and method for manipulating or retracting tissue and anatomical structure
US790588913 Aug 200715 Mar 2011Neotract, Inc.Integrated handle assembly for anchor delivery system
US79098369 Jul 200722 Mar 2011Neotract, Inc.Multi-actuating trigger anchor delivery system
US791454213 Aug 200729 Mar 2011Neotract, Inc.Devices, systems and methods for treating benign prostatic hyperplasia and other conditions
US795115831 May 2011Neotract, Inc.Devices, systems and methods for retracting, lifting, compressing, supporting or repositioning tissues or anatomical structures
US797655412 Jul 2011Vibrynt, Inc.Devices, tools and methods for performing minimally invasive abdominal surgical procedures
US800197423 Aug 2011Vibrynt, Inc.Devices and methods for treatment of obesity
US800750330 Aug 2011Neotract, Inc.Apparatus and method for manipulating or retracting tissue and anatomical structure
US80295044 Oct 2011Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Electroporation ablation apparatus, system, and method
US80375912 Feb 200918 Oct 2011Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical scissors
US804330925 Oct 2011Neotract, Inc.Devices, systems and methods for retracting, lifting, compressing, supporting or repositioning tissues or anatomical structures
US807075930 May 20086 Dec 2011Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical fastening device
US807076819 Apr 20066 Dec 2011Vibrynt, Inc.Devices and methods for treatment of obesity
US807557226 Apr 200713 Dec 2011Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical suturing apparatus
US810092227 Apr 200724 Jan 2012Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Curved needle suturing tool
US811407230 May 200814 Feb 2012Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Electrical ablation device
US81141199 Sep 200814 Feb 2012Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical grasping device
US81578156 Feb 200717 Apr 2012Neotract, Inc.Integrated handle assembly for anchor delivery system
US815783417 Apr 2012Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Rotational coupling device for surgical instrument with flexible actuators
US81727728 May 2012Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Specimen retrieval device
US818729729 May 2012Vibsynt, Inc.Devices and methods for treatment of obesity
US82111183 Jul 2012Neotract, Inc.Apparatus and method for manipulating or retracting tissue and anatomical structure
US821112515 Aug 20083 Jul 2012Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Sterile appliance delivery device for endoscopic procedures
US821625430 Jul 200910 Jul 2012Neotract, Inc.Anchor delivery system with replaceable cartridge
US824120429 Aug 200814 Aug 2012Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Articulating end cap
US825205730 Jan 200928 Aug 2012Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical access device
US826256314 Jul 200811 Sep 2012Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Endoscopic translumenal articulatable steerable overtube
US826265521 Nov 200711 Sep 2012Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Bipolar forceps
US826267529 Oct 200811 Sep 2012Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Methods and devices for applying multiple suture anchors
US826268011 Sep 2012Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Anastomotic device
US83035916 Nov 2012Dallen Medical, Inc.Load shaping for dynamic tensioning mechanisms and methods
US831780627 Nov 2012Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Endoscopic suturing tension controlling and indication devices
US83337766 Aug 201018 Dec 2012Neotract, Inc.Anchor delivery system
US83373941 Oct 200825 Dec 2012Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Overtube with expandable tip
US83421831 Jan 2013Vibrynt, Inc.Devices and methods for treatment of obesity
US834318713 Aug 20071 Jan 2013Neotract, Inc.Devices, systems and methods for treating benign prostatic hyperplasia and other conditions
US835348717 Dec 200915 Jan 2013Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.User interface support devices for endoscopic surgical instruments
US835392515 Jan 2013Vibrynt, Inc.Devices and methods for treatment of obesity
US835660522 Jan 2013Vibrynt, Inc.Devices and methods for treatment of obesity
US836006929 Jan 2013Vibrynt, Inc.Devices and methods for treatment of obesity
US836106612 Jan 200929 Jan 2013Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Electrical ablation devices
US836111227 Jun 200829 Jan 2013Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical suture arrangement
US838277526 Feb 2013Vibrynt, Inc.Methods, instruments and devices for extragastric reduction of stomach volume
US839411012 Mar 2013Neotract, Inc.Apparatus and method for manipulating or retracting tissue and anatomical structure
US839411312 Mar 2013Neotract, Inc.Coiled anchor device
US839866819 Mar 2013Vibrynt, Inc.Devices and methods for treatment of obesity
US840392626 Mar 2013Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Manually articulating devices
US84092002 Apr 2013Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical grasping device
US84145999 Apr 2013Dallen Medical, Inc.Dynamic suture tensioning device and methods
US842550523 Apr 2013Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Electroporation ablation apparatus, system, and method
US842553523 Apr 2013Neotract, Inc.Multi-actuating trigger anchor delivery system
US844953827 Jan 201028 May 2013Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Electroporation ablation apparatus, system, and method
US845465519 Jun 20104 Jun 2013Neotract, Inc.Method for anchoring suture and approximating tissue
US846032111 Jun 2013Vibrynt, Inc.Devices, tools and methods for performing minimally invasive abdominal surgical procedures
US848065731 Oct 20079 Jul 2013Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Detachable distal overtube section and methods for forming a sealable opening in the wall of an organ
US848068625 Sep 20089 Jul 2013Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Methods and devices for delivering and applying suture anchors
US84806892 Sep 20089 Jul 2013Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Suturing device
US849160627 Dec 201023 Jul 2013Neotract, Inc.Median lobe retraction apparatus and method
US849657417 Dec 200930 Jul 2013Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Selectively positionable camera for surgical guide tube assembly
US850656418 Dec 200913 Aug 2013Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical instrument comprising an electrode
US852956325 Aug 200810 Sep 2013Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Electrical ablation devices
US852958427 Dec 201010 Sep 2013Neotract, Inc.Median lobe band implant apparatus and method
US85568589 Jul 200815 Oct 2013Cook Medical Technologies LlcAnchor assembly
US855692511 Oct 200715 Oct 2013Vibrynt, Inc.Devices and methods for treatment of obesity
US856841025 Apr 200829 Oct 2013Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Electrical ablation surgical instruments
US857989721 Nov 200712 Nov 2013Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Bipolar forceps
US857990115 Jun 201012 Nov 2013Dallen Medical, Inc.Suture band buckle and methods
US857993224 Feb 200412 Nov 2013Integrated Vascular Systems, Inc.Sheath apparatus and methods for delivering a closure device
US858573328 May 200919 Nov 2013Vibrynt, IncDevices, tools and methods for performing minimally invasive abdominal surgical procedures
US858583618 Jun 201219 Nov 2013Integrated Vascular Systems, Inc.Methods for manufacturing a clip and clip
US859076024 May 200526 Nov 2013Abbott Vascular Inc.Surgical stapler
US86031061 Jun 201010 Dec 2013Neotract, Inc.Integrated handle assembly for anchor delivery system
US86086525 Nov 200917 Dec 2013Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Vaginal entry surgical devices, kit, system, and method
US8613755 *18 Mar 200924 Dec 2013Dallen Medical, Inc.Knotless dynamic suture tensioning device and methods
US862854227 Dec 201014 Jan 2014Neotract, Inc.Median lobe destruction apparatus and method
US865215030 May 200818 Feb 2014Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Multifunction surgical device
US86578528 Mar 201325 Feb 2014Abbott Vascular Inc.Closure device
US866324313 Aug 20074 Mar 2014Neotract, Inc.Devices, systems and methods for treating benign prostatic hyperplasia and other conditions
US866869617 Aug 201011 Mar 2014Dallen Medical, Inc.Low friction buckle tightening systems and methods
US86687059 Aug 201011 Mar 2014Neotract, Inc.Latching anchor device
US86729536 Jun 201118 Mar 2014Abbott LaboratoriesTissue closure system and methods of use
US867900330 May 200825 Mar 2014Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical device and endoscope including same
US869091031 Mar 20068 Apr 2014Integrated Vascular Systems, Inc.Closure device and methods for making and using them
US871523913 Aug 20076 May 2014Neotract, Inc.Devices, systems and methods for treating benign prostatic hyperplasia and other conditions
US871529714 Jul 20106 May 2014Dallen Medical, Inc.Flat suture banding system and methods
US87152988 Feb 20136 May 2014Neotract, Inc.Apparatus and method for manipulating or retracting tissue and anatomical structure
US872811918 Feb 201120 May 2014Abbott Vascular Inc.Surgical staple
US873446828 Mar 201127 May 2014Neotract, Inc.Devices, systems and methods for treating benign prostatic hyperplasia and other conditions
US87583669 Jul 200724 Jun 2014Neotract, Inc.Multi-actuating trigger anchor delivery system
US875839627 Apr 200624 Jun 2014Integrated Vascular Systems, Inc.Vascular sheath with bioabsorbable puncture site closure apparatus and methods of use
US87583987 Sep 200724 Jun 2014Integrated Vascular Systems, Inc.Apparatus and method for delivering a closure element
US87583992 Aug 201024 Jun 2014Abbott Cardiovascular Systems, Inc.Expandable bioabsorbable plug apparatus and method
US87584008 Nov 201024 Jun 2014Integrated Vascular Systems, Inc.Closure system and methods of use
US87647983 Oct 20111 Jul 2014Smith & Nephew, Inc.Knotless suture anchor
US877126030 May 20088 Jul 2014Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Actuating and articulating surgical device
US8771314 *28 Sep 20078 Jul 2014Ethicon, Inc.Surgical anchor device
US877799215 Mar 201315 Jul 2014Neotract, Inc.Methods for anchoring suture and approximating tissue
US878444725 Apr 200522 Jul 2014Abbott Vascular Inc.Surgical stapler
US879034412 Oct 201229 Jul 2014Dallen Medical, Inc.Load shaping for dynamic tensioning mechanisms and methods
US880831014 Feb 200719 Aug 2014Integrated Vascular Systems, Inc.Resettable clip applier and reset tools
US882060219 Nov 20102 Sep 2014Abbott LaboratoriesModular clip applier
US88215346 Dec 20102 Sep 2014Integrated Vascular Systems, Inc.Clip applier having improved hemostasis and methods of use
US882803112 Jan 20099 Sep 2014Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Apparatus for forming an anastomosis
US883449227 Dec 201016 Sep 2014Neotract, Inc.Continuous indentation lateral lobe apparatus and method
US885859418 Dec 200914 Oct 2014Abbott LaboratoriesCurved closure device
US888879214 Jul 200818 Nov 2014Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Tissue apposition clip application devices and methods
US888879911 Feb 201318 Nov 2014Neotract, Inc.Coiled anchor device
US889394717 Dec 200725 Nov 2014Abbott LaboratoriesClip applier and methods of use
US890025215 Mar 20132 Dec 2014Neotract, Inc.Devices, systems and methods for treating benign prostatic hyperplasia and other conditions
US890593726 Feb 20099 Dec 2014Integrated Vascular Systems, Inc.Methods and apparatus for locating a surface of a body lumen
US89060354 Jun 20089 Dec 2014Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Endoscopic drop off bag
US892663319 Jun 20066 Jan 2015Abbott LaboratoriesApparatus and method for delivering a closure element
US892665610 Jan 20116 Jan 2015Integated Vascular Systems, Inc.Clip applier and methods of use
US893660915 Mar 201320 Jan 2015Neotract, Inc.Apparatus and method for manipulating or retracting tissue and anatomical structure
US89398974 Feb 201127 Jan 2015Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Methods for closing a gastrotomy
US89399963 Dec 201227 Jan 2015Neotract, Inc.Anchor delivery System
US89400013 Aug 200727 Jan 2015Neotract, Inc.Devices, systems and methods for retracting, lifting, compressing, supporting or repositioning tissues or anatomical structures
US89451529 Jul 20073 Feb 2015Neotract, Inc.Multi-actuating trigger anchor delivery system
US895638821 Apr 200817 Feb 2015Integrated Vascular Systems, Inc.Integrated vascular device with puncture site closure component and sealant
US897445621 May 201210 Mar 2015Dallen Medical, Inc.Hybrid medical device implant with migration management
US898619917 Feb 201224 Mar 2015Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Apparatus and methods for cleaning the lens of an endoscope
US89863475 Jun 201424 Mar 2015Smith & Nephew, Inc.Knotless suture anchor
US900519829 Jan 201014 Apr 2015Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical instrument comprising an electrode
US90114314 Sep 201221 Apr 2015Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Electrical ablation devices
US902848318 Dec 200912 May 2015Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical instrument comprising an electrode
US903400130 Jul 200919 May 2015Neotract, Inc.Slotted anchor device
US9039682 *13 Mar 200926 May 2015Merit Medical Systems, Inc.Suture securement apparatus
US904998715 Mar 20129 Jun 2015Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Hand held surgical device for manipulating an internal magnet assembly within a patient
US905006820 May 20139 Jun 2015Abbott LaboratoriesClip applier and methods of use
US905008714 May 20089 Jun 2015Integrated Vascular Systems, Inc.Integrated vascular device with puncture site closure component and sealant and methods of use
US9060751 *30 Dec 201123 Jun 2015Vivasure Medical LimitedSurgical closure systems and methods
US90607691 May 200823 Jun 2015Abbott Vascular Inc.Surgical stapler
US90786623 Jul 201214 Jul 2015Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Endoscopic cap electrode and method for using the same
US90893118 Jan 201028 Jul 2015Abbott Vascular Inc.Vessel closure devices and methods
US908932025 Sep 200828 Jul 2015Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Methods and devices for delivering and applying multiple suture anchors
US908967415 Sep 200628 Jul 2015Integrated Vascular Systems, Inc.Apparatus and methods for positioning a vascular sheath
US91492669 Aug 20106 Oct 2015Neotract, Inc.Deforming anchor device
US914927621 Mar 20116 Oct 2015Abbott Cardiovascular Systems, Inc.Clip and deployment apparatus for tissue closure
US915552829 Jan 201313 Oct 2015Vibrynt, Inc.Methods, instruments and devices for extragastic reduction of stomach volume
US916174912 Apr 201220 Oct 2015Neotract, Inc.Method and apparatus for treating sexual dysfunction
US91736448 Jan 20103 Nov 2015Abbott Vascular Inc.Closure devices, systems, and methods
US922052620 Mar 201229 Dec 2015Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Rotational coupling device for surgical instrument with flexible actuators
US922677230 Jan 20095 Jan 2016Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical device
US923324118 Jan 201212 Jan 2016Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Electrical ablation devices and methods
US924169629 Oct 200926 Jan 2016Abbott Vascular Inc.Closure device
US925416928 Feb 20119 Feb 2016Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Electrical ablation devices and methods
US92717078 Mar 20131 Mar 2016Integrated Vascular Systems, Inc.Clip applier and methods of use
US927795715 Aug 20128 Mar 2016Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Electrosurgical devices and methods
US928296516 May 200815 Mar 2016Abbott LaboratoriesApparatus and methods for engaging tissue
US92954693 Jun 201329 Mar 2016Abbott Vascular Inc.Blood vessel closure clip and delivery device
US931423022 Aug 201419 Apr 2016Abbott Vascular Inc.Closure device with rapidly eroding anchor
US931436228 Sep 201219 Apr 2016Vibrynt, Inc.Methods, instruments and devices for extragastric reduction of stomach volume
US931462028 Feb 201119 Apr 2016Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Electrical ablation devices and methods
US932051115 Mar 201326 Apr 2016Neotract, Inc.Multi-actuating trigger anchor delivery system
US932052231 Aug 201126 Apr 2016Integrated Vascular Systems, Inc.Closure device and methods for making and using them
US933297630 Nov 201110 May 2016Abbott Cardiovascular Systems, Inc.Tissue closure device
US20060265042 *22 Dec 200523 Nov 2006Exploramed Nc2, Inc.Devices, systems and methods for retracting, lifting, compressing, supporting or repositioning tissues or anatomical structures
US20070049929 *24 Jul 20061 Mar 2007Catanese Joseph IiiApparatus and method for manipulating or retracting tissue and anatomical structure
US20070112383 *15 Nov 200517 May 2007Conlon Sean PSelf-shielding suture anchor
US20070142846 *6 Feb 200721 Jun 2007Neotract, Inc.Integrated handle assembly for anchor delivery system
US20070250020 *19 Apr 200625 Oct 2007Steven KimDevices and methods for treatment of obesity
US20070250103 *10 Mar 200725 Oct 2007Joshua MakowerDevices and methods for treatment of obesity
US20070276412 *13 Aug 200729 Nov 2007Neotract, Inc.Integrated handle assembly for anchor delivery system
US20080021484 *3 Aug 200724 Jan 2008Neotract, Inc.Apparatus and method for manipulating or retracting tissue and anatomical structure
US20080033232 *3 Aug 20077 Feb 2008Neotract, Inc.Devices, systems and methods for retracting, lifting, compressing, supporting or repositioning tissues or anatomical structures
US20080033456 *13 Aug 20077 Feb 2008Neotract, Inc.Integrated handle assembly for anchor delivery system
US20080033458 *9 Jul 20077 Feb 2008Neotract, Inc.Multi-actuating trigger anchor delivery system
US20080033488 *3 Aug 20077 Feb 2008Neotract, Inc.Devices, systems and methods for retracting, lifting, compressing, supporting or repositioning tissues or anatomical structures
US20080039874 *3 Aug 200714 Feb 2008Neotract, Inc.Devices, systems and methods for retracting, lifting, compressing, supporting or repositioning tissues or anatomical structures
US20080039893 *9 Jul 200714 Feb 2008Neotract, Inc.Multi-actuating trigger anchor delivery system
US20080051823 *24 Jul 200728 Feb 2008Joshua MakowerDevices and methods for treatment of obesity
US20090012547 *23 Jun 20088 Jan 2009Joshua MakowerDevices and methods for treatment of obesity
US20090012555 *23 Jun 20088 Jan 2009Joshua MakowerDevices and methods for treatment of obesity
US20090024148 *1 May 200822 Jan 2009Zeiner Mark SMethod for forming plications of the gastric cavity
US20090036910 *13 Oct 20085 Feb 2009Vibrynt, Inc.Devices and Methods for Treatment of Obesity
US20090088797 *28 Sep 20072 Apr 2009Ethicon, Inc.Surgical anchor device
US20090143794 *29 Nov 20074 Jun 2009Conlon Sean PTissue resection device
US20090192439 *13 Aug 200730 Jul 2009Neotract, Inc.Devices, systems and methods for treating benign prostatic hyperplasia and other conditions
US20090204147 *4 Dec 200813 Aug 2009Rahmani Emad YMethods and apparatuses for delivering achoring devices into body passage walls
US20090234295 *13 Mar 200917 Sep 2009Merit Medical Systems, Inc.Suture Securement Apparatus
US20090287227 *28 May 200919 Nov 2009Newell Matthew BMinimally invasive ,methods for implanting obesity treatment devices
US20090326561 *27 Jun 200831 Dec 2009Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical suture arrangement
US20100010448 *9 Jul 200814 Jan 2010Cook IncorporatedAnchor assembly
US20100069930 *18 Mar 2010VentralFix, Inc.Method and apparatus for minimally invasive delivery, tensioned deployment and fixation of secondary material prosthetic devices in patient body tissue, including hernia repair within the patient's herniation site
US20100076462 *25 Mar 2010Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Methods and devices for delivering and applying suture anchors
US20100076488 *25 Mar 2010Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Methods and devices for delivering and applying multiple suture anchors
US20100106166 *29 Oct 200829 Apr 2010Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Methods and devices for applying mulitple suture anchors
US20110022085 *22 Jul 200927 Jan 2011Wisconsin Alumni Research FoundationBiologically active sutures for regenerative medicine
US20110218568 *8 Sep 2011Voss Laveille KVessel closure devices, systems, and methods
US20110238089 *29 Sep 2011Abbott LaboratoriesTissue closure system and methods of use
US20120226308 *30 Dec 20116 Sep 2012Vivasure Medical LimitedSurgical closure systems and methods
US20130303856 *29 Sep 201014 Nov 2013Vectec S.A.Single Use, Disposable, Tissue Suspender Device
US20130345747 *25 Apr 201326 Dec 2013Arthrex, Inc.Biological suture anchor with suture eyelet
CN102665579B *24 Nov 20108 Jul 2015海尔斯特提斯有限公司Hair implant anchors and systems and methods for use thereof
EP2016909A217 Jul 200821 Jan 2009Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Device for insufflating the interior of a gastric cavity of a patient
EP2016910A217 Jul 200821 Jan 2009Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Hybrid endoscopic/laparoscopic device for forming serosa to serosa plications in a gastric cavity
EP2503945A1 *24 Nov 20103 Oct 2012Hairstetics Ltd.Hair implant anchors and systems and methods for use thereof
WO2009076190A1 *5 Dec 200818 Jun 2009Indiana University Research & Technology CorporationMethods and apparatuses for delivering anchoring devices into body passage walls
WO2010053708A122 Oct 200914 May 2010Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Methods and devices for applying multiple suture anchors
WO2011064772A1 *24 Nov 20103 Jun 2011Hairstetics Ltd.Hair implant anchors and systems and methods for use thereof
WO2015077421A1 *20 Nov 201428 May 2015The Regents Of The University Of CaliforniaSystem and method for depositing a hook at a target within a soft tissue
Classifications
U.S. Classification606/232
International ClassificationA61B17/04
Cooperative ClassificationA61B2017/0409, A61B17/0401, A61B2017/0406, A61B2017/0464, A61B2017/06052, A61B2017/0438, A61B2017/0417, A61B2017/0458, A61B2090/036, A61B2017/0427, A61B2017/0437, A61B2017/0435, A61B2017/0454, A61B2017/0412
European ClassificationA61B17/04A
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
20 Feb 2006ASAssignment
Owner name: ETHICON ENDO-SURGERY, INC.,OHIO
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:CONLON, SEAN P.;REEL/FRAME:017189/0747
Effective date: 20060215