Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS20050059566 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 10/664,003
Publication date17 Mar 2005
Filing date16 Sep 2003
Priority date5 Jan 2000
Also published asUS7064241, US20050288203, WO2005076777A2, WO2005076777A3
Publication number10664003, 664003, US 2005/0059566 A1, US 2005/059566 A1, US 20050059566 A1, US 20050059566A1, US 2005059566 A1, US 2005059566A1, US-A1-20050059566, US-A1-2005059566, US2005/0059566A1, US2005/059566A1, US20050059566 A1, US20050059566A1, US2005059566 A1, US2005059566A1
InventorsJerry Brown, Richard Hodge, Margaret McCabe, Karen McGrady, Amanda Schilling
Original AssigneeBrown Jerry S., Hodge Richard C., Mccabe Margaret A., Mcgrady Karen A., Schilling Amanda S.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Chemical and biological warfare decontaminating solution using peracids and germinants in microemulsions, process and product thereof
US 20050059566 A1
Abstract
A microemulsion composition having a solid source of peroxycarboxylic acid and germinant is used for chemical and biological warfare decontamination. A process for decontaminating uses the microemulsion composition.
Images(7)
Previous page
Next page
Claims(20)
1. A microemulsion composition for decontaminating chemical and biological warfare agent, comprising:
a microemulsion;
a solid source of peroxycarboxylic acid dissolved in the microemulsion; and,
a germinant in combination with the solid peroxycarboxylic acid within the microemulsion.
2. The microemulsion composition of claim 1, wherein the microemulsion comprises a surfactant selected from the group consisting of didecyl methylamine oxide, dimethyl decylamine oxide, and combinations thereof.
3. The microemulsion composition of claim 1, wherein the peroxycarboxylic acid comprises peracetic acid.
4. The microemulsion composition of claim 3, wherein the peracetic acid comprises peracetyl borate.
5. The microemulsion composition of claim 1, wherein the peroxycarboxylic acid is present in an amount of from about 0.01 g/mL to about 0.20 g/mL.
6. The microemulsion composition of claim 5, wherein the peroxycarboxylic acid is present in an amount of from about 0.10 g/mL to about 0.15 g/mL.
7. The microemulsion composition of claim 1, wherein the germinant is selected from the group consisting of dipicolinic acid, alanine, asparagine, glucose, fructose, potassium chloride, and combinations thereof.
8. The microemulsion composition of claim 7, wherein the genninant comprises dipicolinic acid.
9. The microemulsion composition of claim 8, wherein the dipicolinic acid is present in an amount of from about 0.03 molar amount to about 0.30 molar amount.
10. The microemulsion composition of claim 9, wherein the dipicolinic acid is present in an amount of from about 0.15 molar amount to about 0.25 molar amount.
11. The microemulsion composition of claim 1, wherein the pH of the composition ranges from about 7.0 to about 10.0.
12. A microemulsion composition for decontaminating chemical and biological warfare agent, comprising:
a microemulsion selected from the group consisting of didecyl methylamine oxide, dimethyl decylamine oxide, and combinations thereof;
peracetyl borate dissolved in the microemulsion; and,
dipicolinic acid effective for spore germination in combination with the peracetyl borate within the microemulsion.
13. A chemical and biological warfare decontamination composition comprising the microemulsion composition of claim 1.
14. A kit for decontamination comprising the microemulsion composition of claim 1.
15. An area decontamination system comprising the microemulsion composition of claim 1.
16. A process for decontaminating a contaminated surface, comprising the steps of:
providing a microemulsion composition having a microemulsion, a solid source of peroxycarboxylic acid suspended in the microemulsion and a germinant in combination with the solid peroxycarboxylic acid within the microemulsion; and,
applying the microemulsion composition to the contaminated surface effective for decontamination thereof.
17. The process of claim 16, wherein the microemulsion composition comprises a microemulsion, peracetyl borate and dipicolinic acid.
18. The process of claim 16, wherein the microemulsion composition comprises a surfactant selected from the group consisting of didecyl methylamine oxide, dimethyl decylamine oxide, and combinations thereof.
19. A decontaminated surface product produced by the process of claim 16.
20. A microemulsion composition for decontaminating chemical and biological warfare agent, comprising:
a microemulsion;
a peroxycarboxylic acid in the microemulsion; and,
a germinant in combination with the peroxycarboxylic acid within the microemulsion.
Description
    STATEMENT REGARDING FEDERALLY SPONSORED RESEARCH OR DEVELOPMENT
  • [[0001]]
    The invention described herein may be manufactured and used by or for the government of the United States of America for governmental purposes without the payment of any royalties thereon or therefor.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • [0002]
    1. Field of the Invention
  • [0003]
    The present invention provides a chemical warfare agent decontamination (decon) solution. More particularly, the decontamination solution includes a microemulsion composition having a solid source of peroxycarboxylic acid dissolved in the microemulsion and a germinant in combination with the solid peroxycarboxylic acid. The decontaminating solution is useful in neutralizing chemical and biological warfare agents.
  • [0004]
    2. Brief Description of the Related Art
  • [0005]
    Chemical agents (CA) and biological agents (BA), (collectively CB agents) are becoming an increasingly problematic to military commander and civil authorities. Use of these agents is known in chemical (CW) and biological (BW) warfare. Biological agents are particulates that include microorganisms such as bacteria, viruses and fungi. Unlike chemical agents, a time delay may occur before the full extent of the effects of the biological agents become apparent. In some biological agents, such as anthrax, spore production enables biological agents to remain in an environment for years while retaining biological activity.
  • [0006]
    Chemical agents, used as CW agents, include vesicants such as Sulfur Mustard (HD), Nitrogen Mustard (HN-1; HN-2 and HN-3), Lewisite (L), nerve gases that include phosphonofluoridates such as Tabun (GA), Sarin (GB) and Soman (GD) and V compounds that include phosphorylthiocholines such as VX. Vesicants act as blistering agents that attack skin and mucous membranes. Nerve agents act on the central nervous system by reacting with the enzyme acetylcholinesterase to cause respiratory collapse, convulsions and death.
  • [0007]
    Methods for decontamination of chemical warfare agents, which include a variety of organophosphorus and organosulfur compounds, are known in the art. However, these known methods use compositions which have certain undesirable properties, including corrosiveness, flammability and toxicity. For example, hypochlorite formulations are very corrosive and toxic. Additionally, application of the hypochlorite decontaminant often requires substantial scrubbing for removal and destruction of the chemical warfare agent, a procedure which limits its use.
  • [0008]
    One decontaminant, Decontamination Solution 2 (DS2) used by the United States Army, is useful against a variety of chemical and biological warfare agents. DS2 contains 70% diethylenetriamine, 28% ethylene glycol monomethyl ether and 2% sodium hydroxide. However, DS2 spontaneously ignites upon contact with hypochlorites and hypochlorite-based decontaminants. Further, DS2 may cause corrosion to aluminum, cadmium, tin and zinc after prolonged contact, and softens and removes paint. Similar corrosion and human toxicity problems exist with the bleach decontamination solution (HTH) used by the United States Navy. Current decontamination solutions, while effective against both chemical and biological agents, use hydrogen peroxide as the primary oxidant. Liquid hydrogen peroxide presents handling, storage, and shipping problems. These solutions, in the mixed form, tend to offgas and foam.
  • [0009]
    Strong oxidizers may be used to detoxify warfare agent, however, several problems exist with the use of the strong oxidizers. The reactivity of most strong oxidizers inhibit long shelf life of any decontaminating solution, tend to be corrosive, and are hazardous to humans and the environment. Also, most of the strong oxidizers are liquids, making shipping and storage a problem.
  • [0010]
    In view of the foregoing, there is a need for an effective chemical and biological warfare agent decontamination solution that is particularly effective against hazardous biological organisms while being non-corrosive, nontoxic, nonflammable, and environmentally safe. The present invention addresses this and other needs.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • [0011]
    The present invention includes a microemulsion composition for decontaminating chemical and biological warfare agent comprising a microemulsion, a solid source of peroxycarboxylic acid dissolved in the microemulsion and a germinant in combination with the solid peroxycarboxylic acid within the microemulsion. The present invention also includes a chemical and biological warfare decontamination composition, and a kit, having this microemulsion composition. Additionally, the present invention includes an area decontamination system comprising the microemulsion composition.
  • [0012]
    Furthermore, the present invention includes a process for decontaminating a contaminated surface comprising the steps of providing the microemulsion composition and applying the microemulsion composition to the contaminated surface in a manner that is effective for decontamination of the contaminated surface. A decontaminated surface product produced by this process is part of the present invention.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT
  • [0013]
    The present invention combines a solid, stable oxidant and a spore germinant into a microemulsion formulation to produce a decontaminating solution. Advantageously, this combination provides a superior composition to neutralize the threat chemical agents, such as VX, HD, and GD, while providing an effective disinfectant against biological agents, such as vegetative bacterial cells and spores, fungi, viruses and the like. As such, the present invention provides a novel microemulsion composition useful in decontamination of chemical and biological warfare agents.
  • [0014]
    The microemulsion composition of the present invention uses a solid source of peroxycarboxylic acid dissolved in the microemulsion in combination with the germinant. With the component parts of the decontaminating solution mixed, the peroxycarboxylic acid is available for degradation of the chemical and biological warfare agents. The peroxycarboxylic acid, an oxidizing agent, attacks the chemical and biological warfare agents. As the peroxycarboxylic acid attacks the warfare agent, the microemulsion provides a medium to enhance contact of the peroxycarboxylic acid with the chemical warfare agents. Once the warfare agent has been detoxified, the residual components of the decontaminating solution and warfare agent may be removed by any known method, such as a water rinse, or soap and water. Any known method of rinsing may be used, such as application of the water by hose, mop, scrubbers and the like.
  • [0015]
    The microemulsion of the present invention includes any appropriate system for suspension or dissolution of the solid source of peroxycarboxylic acid and germinant combination. The microemulsion preferably includes a surfactant composition or system having one or more surfactants, water and hydrocarbon compound. Low interfacial tension of the surface active compounds found within the emulsion helps dissolve the warfare agents, aiding detoxification from increased intimate contact between the oxidizer and warfare agent. The microemulsion preferably comprises the combined surfactant component in an amount of from about 5 wt % to about 60 wt %, water in an amount of from about 5 wt % to about 60 wt %, and hydrocarbon compound in an amount of from about 5 wt % to about 60 wt %. An exemplary microemulsion composition includes approximately 42.4 wt % water, 17.2 wt % decane and 24.6 wt % surfactants (neat). Buffers, and other known microemulsion additives may be added, as desired. Microemulsions have been disclosed to extract warfare agents which are then washed off, as detailed in U.S. Pat. No. 5,612,300 to von Blucher et al., the disclosure of which is herein incorporated by reference.
  • [0016]
    Preferred microemulsion systems include surfactants, particularly surfactants such as didecyl methylamine oxide, dimethyl decylamine oxide, and combinations thereof. Surfactants used within the microemulsion preferably include two amine oxide surfactants. The amine oxide surfactants may include, for example, any N-alkyldimethylamine or N-dialkylmethylamine oxide, having C10, C12, C14, C16 alkyls or mixtures of these. Exemplary surfactants include didecyl methylamine oxide manufactured by Albemarle Chemical of Baton Rouge, La. and sold under the tradename “Damox 1010” (76%), and decyl dimethylamine oxide manufactured by Lonza Chemical of Fair Lawn, N.J., and sold under the tradename “Barlox 10S” (30%). Preferred surfactant systems include amine oxides.
  • [0017]
    Preferably, microemulsions of the present invention comprise a water content of from about 20% to about 50% by weight with a hydrocarbon component dispersed therein. The hydrocarbon or oil component of the microemulsion may non-exclusively include alkane compounds with from about C5 or higher, such as decane (C10), dodecane (C12), tetradecane (C14), and hexadecane (C16). The alkane should be nontoxic, nonflammable and resistant to oxidation. The hydrocarbon component is preferably present in amounts of from about 10% to about 30% by weight.
  • [0018]
    The peroxycarboxylic acids, also known as peracids, of the present invention provide a strong oxidizer that is effective in decontamination solutions to detoxify nerve agent, such as VX and HD with the G-agents readily neutralized at a moderately elevated pH. The peroxycarboxylic acid oxidizers of the present invention include peracetic acid (PAA) for effectiveness against chemical agents while possessing a high decontaminant activity against bacteria, fungi, and viruses. Representative peracids of the present invention are described in U.S. Pat. No. 6,369,288, to Brown, entitled “Chemical and Biological Warfare Decontaminating Solution Using Bleach Activators”, the disclosure of which is herein incorporated by reference for the teaching of peroxycarboxylic acids. The preferred peracetic acid source is peracetyl borate (PAB). Peracids are strong oxidizers that leave a limited environmental footprint because of their breakdown products of water and a weak acid. At a moderate pH range, the peracids are effective and non-corrosive to machinery and other articles, such as military materials.
  • [0019]
    Synthesis of peracetyl borate is described by Roesler, et al. in U.S. Pat. No. 5,462,692, to Roesler et al., entitled “Stable Solid Acetyperoxyborate Compounds”, the disclosure of which is hereby incorporated by reference for such teachings. Use of the peracid as a decontaminant in a chemical/biological decontamination formulation substantially destroys or eliminates all forms of microbial life in the inanimate environment, including forms of vegetative bacteria, fingi, and viruses.
  • [0020]
    Effective amounts of the peroxycarboxylic acid are determinable by those skilled in the art for specific concentrations of warfare agent, types and amounts of germinant, contact methods, additional chemical warfare countermeasures, operational necessities, and other like factors considered for personnel ingress and egress from an exposed area. Preferably, effective detoxification includes normal human contact within a previously contaminated environment that has been treated with the decontamination solution of the present invention without any adverse health effects. Preferred amounts includes, for example without limitation, from about 0.01 g/mL to about 0.20 g/mL, with a more preferred amount in the range of from about 0.03 g/mL to about 0.15 g/mL, and with a most preferred amount in the range of from about 0.04 g/mL to about 0.10 g/mL.
  • [0021]
    Of the three broad classes of biological threats (bacteria, fungi, and viruses), the endospore forming bacteria presents the most difficult threat to neutralize. Spores have a highly protective coat and can remain dormant for extended periods of time. Under certain conditions, such as temperature, moisture, and/or chemical stimulus, spores germinate and become vegetative cells. In this vegetative state the endospore forming bacteria are most vulnerable to decontamination. The decontamination solution of the present invention contains three elements effective biological decontamination. These three elements include a strong oxidizer, surfactants to reduce the surface tension between the spores and the components of the decontamination solution, and a germinant to induce germination.
  • [0022]
    The present invention includes a type and amount of germinant that is effective to germinate resident spores within the contamination. This germination allows for a broad, more complete, decontamination of the hazard. Germinants of the present invention include, for example without limitation, dipicolinic acid, alanine, asparagine, glucose, fructose, potassium chloride, and the like, and combinations thereof. The preferred germinant of the present invention includes dipicolinic acid (DPA), that more preferably includes the presence of calcium ions. Representative amounts of germinant include from about 0.03 molar amount to about 0.30 molar amount, with a more preferred range of from about 0.15 molar amount to about 0.25 molar amount. The pH of the microemulsion composition preferably ranges from about 7 to about 10, such as from about 8 to about 9.5.
  • [0023]
    A preferred microemulsion composition for decontaminating chemical and biological warfare agent includes a surfactant of didecyl methylamine oxide and dimethyl decylamine oxide, peracetyl borate and dipicolonic acid. This formulation, and other formulations taught herein, may be incorporated into a kit or an area decontamination system.
  • [0024]
    Within the microemulsion, the mixed peracid and germinant remain stable with no offgassing or foaming generally occurring. Additionally, the microemulsion provides a compatibility, e.g., non-corrosive properties, with military materials, and is generally safe for the user and immediate environment of use.
  • [0025]
    In operation, the decontaminating solution of the present invention is applied onto a contaminated area or surface to neutralize or detoxify the chemical and/or biological warfare agent. Application of the decontamination solution includes placing the peracid in a microemulsion, and incorporating a germinant together with the peracid. The combination of the peracid and germinant in the microemulsion system or composition provides a synergistic effect in killing spores while the peroxycarboxylic acid neutralizes chemical agents. The microemulsion composition is contacted with a biological and/or chemical warfare agent that reacts with the peroxycarboxylic acid and become detoxified. Representative applications of the microemulsion include, for example without limitation, application by mops, brushes, sprayers and other known solution applicators. The decontaminating solution of the present invention is noncorrosive, nontoxic, and nonflammable, and useful in rapidly neutralizing individual and combinations of chemical and biological warfare agents, such as VX, GD and HD, and vegetative and endospore forming bacteria, fungi and virus. The resultant decontaminated surface is free of contamination.
  • EXAMPLE 1
  • [0026]
    3,023 mg of an alkane sulfonate surfactant blend of approximately 52% of Clariant's Hostapur SAS-30 (secondary alkane sulfonate, sodium salt) and 48% of Dow Chemical's Dowfax Hydrotrope (benzene 1,1′-oxybis-,sec-hexyl derivative, sulfonated sodium salts) was weighed into a reaction vessel. 1,483 μL of 3.0 M KOH solution was added and mixed. Chemical agent sufficient to achieve a concentration of 0.1 M was added and mixed. 660 μL of 15% peracetic acid solution was added and mixed. A 15-minute decontamination period was allowed followed by neutralization and determination of the amount remaining chemical agent.
  • [0027]
    The peracetic acid used in Example 1 was a commercial solution of 15% peracetic acid. The disadvantage of the peracetic acid solution is stability evidenced by foaming and offgassing in the mixed system. As the commercial grades of PAA are mixtures of acetic acid, hydrogen peroxide, peracetic acid, stabilizing agents, and water, the foaming and offgassing is caused by the hydrogen peroxide.
  • [0028]
    The results of Example 1 are shown in Table 1, below.
    TABLE 1
    CHEMICAL AGENT EFFICIENCY
    Decon Efficiency of 0.1M Chemical Agent by 0.3M PAA,
    Mixed Sulfonate μEm, Buffered to pH = 10
    % Agent
    Neutralized
    Reaction Time, min HD GD VX
    0 0.00 0.00 0.00
    15 98.21 99.99 98.39
    30 98.31 99.99 98.58
    60 99.15 99.99 98.72
  • EXAMPLE 2
  • [0029]
    342 mg of a mixed amine oxide surfactant blend of approximately 14% of Albemarle's Damox 1010 and 86% of Lonza's Barlox 10S, 646 mg of deionized water, 75 mg of sodium Carbonate, and 10 mg of dipicolinic acid were weighed into a vial and mixed until homogeneous. 125 mg of peracetyl borate was added to a second vial. The contents of the two vials were combined and mixed until the solid peracetyl borate is fully dissolved. The solution was transferred to a 5 mm Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) tube. Chemical agent sufficient to achieve a concentration of 0.1 M was added to the NMR tube. The reaction progress was monitored by NMR spectroscopy.
  • [0030]
    The stability problems found in Example 1 were resolved by the use of a solid form of peracetic acid called peracetyl borate. Upon dissolution in water, peracetyl borate generates peracetic acid with minimal generation of hydrogen peroxide. Decontamination systems incorporating the peracetyl borate retain the advantage of having a strong oxidizer such as peracetic acid, without the foaming and offgassing observed with formulations containing hydrogen peroxide.
  • [0031]
    Incorporation of peracetyl borate into a microemulsion yielded a very stable formulation with no offgassing or foaming. The high decontamination efficiency of the peracetyl borate microemulsion formulation toward the chemical agents is shown in Table 2, below.
    TABLE 2
    CHEMICAL AGENT EFFICIENCY
    Decon Efficiency of 0.1M CA by 0.3M PAB, Mixed Amine
    Oxide Surfactant μEm, Buffered to pH = 8.5
    % Agent
    Neutralized
    Reaction Time, min HD GD VX
    0 0.0 0.0 0.0
    15 100.0 97.2 56.6
  • EXAMPLE 3
  • [0032]
    The effectiveness of various combinations of microemulsion, peracid and germinant were tested.
  • [0033]
    For formulation A, 135 mg of didecyl methylamine oxide was brought to a volume of 4 mL with deionized water. For formulation B, 1178 mg of dimethyl decylamine oxide was brought to a volume of 4 mL with deionized water. For formulation C, 1368 mg of a mixed amine oxide surfactant blend of approximately 14% of Albemarle's Damox 1010 and 86% of Lonza's Barlox 10S, 2584 mg of deionized water, and 300 mg of sodium carbonate were weighed into a vial and mixed until homogeneous. 500 mg of peracetyl borate was added to a second vial. The contents of the two vials were combined and mixed until the solid peracetyl borate was fully dissolved. For formulation D, 40 mg of dipicolinic acid was brought to a volume of 4 mL with deionized water. For formulation E, 528 μL of 15% commercial peracetic acid solution was brought to a volume of 4 mL with deionized water.
  • [0034]
    10 μL of a suspension of Bacillus globigii spores with a concentration of 1010 colony forming units (CFU) were added to a reaction vessel. 990 μL of the formulation were added to a reaction vessel. The reaction mixture was stirred for 15 minutes. In formulations C and E, the reaction mixture was neutralized with 1 mL of sodium metabisulfite solution with a concentration of 330 mg/mL. The remaining Bacillus globigii spores were isolated and serial dilutions were performed. The dilutions were plated on LB agar. Colonies were counted following incubation of the plates for 24 hours at 37 degrees C.
  • [0035]
    Formulations A and B contained 108 Bacillus globigii spores and the individual surfactants of the amine oxide microemulsion in concentrations used in the microemulsion system. Formulation C contained 108 Bacillus globigii spores and 0.38 M peracetyl borate in the mixed amine oxide (2.3% didecyl methylamine oxide and 8.8% dimethyl decylamine oxide) microemulsion system of 4 mL. Formulation D contained 106 Bacillus globigii spores and 0.1 M dipicolinic acid. Formulation E contained 108 Bacillus globigii spores and 264 μL of 15% commercial peracetic acid solution (containing 600 ppm dipicolinic acid as a stabilizer).
    TABLE 3
    BIOCIDAL EFFICIENCY
    Reduction in Bacillus globigii After
    Exposure to Candidate Solutions
    Initial Log Reduction,
    CFU/mL CFU/mL
    A: Didecyl methylamine oxide surfactant 108 0 in 30 minutes
    B: Dimethyl decylamine oxide surfactant 108 0 in 30 minutes
    C: PAB in mixed amine oxide μEm 108 4 in 15 minutes
    D: DPA 106 0 in 15 minutes
    E: PAA 108 4 in 15 minutes

    Note:

    Due to the reactive nature of the systems for Formulations C and E, a neutralization step was needed. The neutralization step included the addition of 1 mL of 330 mg/ml sodium metabisulfite solution.
  • [0036]
    Example 3 demonstrated the ineffectiveness of the amine oxide surfactants individually (Formulations A & B), the surfactants combined with peracetyl borate (Formulation C), the dipicolinic acid alone (Formulation D), or a combination of oxidizers and dipicolinic acid (Formulation E).
  • EXAMPLE 4
  • [0037]
    A series of experiments was conducted on the effectiveness of formulations containing microemulsion compositions containing a peracid and germinant. Formulation F contains Bacillus globigii spores, surfactants and a 15% commercial peracetic acid solution. Formulation G contains Bacillus globigii spores, surfactants, peracetyl borate and dipicolinic acid.
  • [0038]
    1368 mg of a mixed amine oxide surfactant blend of approximately 14% of Albemarle's Damox 1010 and 86% of Lonza's Barlox 10S, 2584 mg of deionized water, 300 mg of sodium carbonate, and 40 mg of dipicolinic acid were weighed into a vial and mixed until homogeneous. 500 mg of peracetyl borate was added to a second vial. The contents of the two vials were combined and mixed until the solid peracetyl borate was fully dissolved. 10 μL of a suspension of Bacillus globigii spores with a concentration of 1010 colony forming units was added to a reaction vessel. 990 μL of the decontamination solution was added to the reaction vessel. The reaction mixture was stirred for 15 minutes. The reaction mixture was neutralized with 1 mL of sodium metabisulfite solution with a concentration of 330 mg/mL. The remaining Bacillus globigii spores were isolated and serial dilutions were performed. The dilutions were plated on LB agar. Colonies were counted following incubation of the plates for 24 hours at 37 degrees C.
    TABLE 4
    BIOCIDAL EFFICIENCY
    Reduction in Bacillus globigii from 108 Initial
    CFU/mL After 15 Minute Exposure to Candidate Solutions
    Log Reduction, CFU/mL
    F: PAA in mixed amine oxide μEm 8
    G: PAB and DPA in mixed amine oxide μEm 8
  • [0039]
    The series of experiments are summarized in Table 5, below.
    TABLE 5
    SUMMARY PEROXYGEN BIOCIDAL EFFICIENCY TESTS
    Formulation Surfactant Oxidizer Germinant Effectiveness*
    Formulation A Yes No No No
    Formulation B Yes No No No
    Formulation C Yes Yes No No
    Formulation D No No Yes No
    Formulation E No Yes Yes No
    Formulation F Yes Yes Yes Yes
    Formulation G Yes Yes Yes Yes

    *Effectiveness against Bacillus globigii spores.
  • [0040]
    Live agent tests with Bacillus anthracis (anthrax) confirmed these results. 1368 mg of a mixed amine oxide surfactant blend of approximately 14% of Albemarle's Damox 1010 and 86% of Lonza's Barlox 10S, 2584 mg of deionized water, 300 mg of sodium carbonate, and 40 mg of dipicolinic acid were weighed into a vial and mixed until homogeneous. 500 mg of peracetyl borate was added to a second vial. The contents of the two vials were combined and mixed until the solid peracetyl borate was fully dissolved. 100 μL of a suspension of Bacillus anthracis spores with a concentration of 108 colony forming units was added to a reaction vessel. 900 μL of the decontamination solution was added to the reaction vessel. The reaction mixture was stirred for 15 minutes. The reaction mixture was neutralized with 1 mL of sodium metabisulfite solution with a concentration of 330 mg/mL. The remaining anthrax spores were isolated and serial dilutions were performed. The dilutions were plated on 5% sheep's blood agar. Colonies were counted following incubation of the plates for 48 hours at 37 degrees C.
  • [0041]
    In Formulation H, peracetyl borate with dipicolinic acid in a mixed amine oxide surfactant system demonstrated excellent decontamination ability with Bacillus anthracis, as shown in Table 6, below.
    TABLE 6
    BIOCIDAL EFFICIENCY
    Reduction in Bacillus anthracis from 107 Initial
    CFU/mL, 15 Minute Exposure to Candidate Solutions
    Log Reduction, CFU/mL
    H: PAB and DPA in mixed amine oxide μEm 7
  • [0042]
    The present invention provides decontamination technology that is superior to combinations of surfactants (macro or microemulsions) in decontamination solutions, peracids in a decontamination solution, peracids as a biocide, or the application of a germinant formulation prior to or concurrent with application of decontamination solution. Uniquely, the present invention may use a solid peracetyl borate as a means of producing a stable, non-foaming chemical/biological decontamination solution. Additionally, the present invention includes an oxidizer, surfactant(s) and germinant, in a combination chemical and biological decontamination formulation. This allow the surfactants to bring the reactants in contact with the agents and spores, causing the spores to germinate with a non-metabolizable compound and reducing the concentration of chemical and biological agents with the peracetic acid from the solid peracetyl borate.
  • [0043]
    The present invention provides several advantages. These include the ability to significantly reduce or neutralize, within a reasonable amount of time, the effects of chemical agents using peracetyl borate as the oxidizer in a microemulsion system, shown in testing of VX, HD, and GD with the ability to neutralize, within a reasonable amount of time, the effects of biological warfare agents using a combination of surfactants, oxidizer, and germinant, shown in testing of the anthrax simulant Bacillus globigii as well as Bacillus anthracis. The present invention allows storage of oxidative components of the decontamination system for periods of time greater than several months with the ability to safely and easily handle and store the oxidative components of the decontamination system. The reaction products of the reactive components of the decontamination solution are water and weak acids which lowers toxicity to humans and produces smaller environmental footprint.
  • [0044]
    Specifically, the microemulsion allows for intimate contact of the chemical/biological agents with germinant(s) and peracid(s), and the stability of the peracid source allows for easy handling and storage of the decontamination solution components. The decontaminating agent compositions of the present invention are nontoxic and useful in detoxifying/neutralizing a variety of chemical warfare agents, including organosulfur agents such as mustard gas, and organophosphorus agents such as the nerve agents termed VX and GD. The decontaminating agents of the present invention may also be used to neutralize selected organophosphorus agricultural chemicals. Decontamination is effected by applying a decontaminating agent of the present invention to the contaminated material, equipment, personnel, or the like. Such application includes any suitable means for applying a solution onto a contaminated surface, with the type and manner of application determinable by those skilled in the art, such as spraying, showering, washing or other suitable means. Generally, such application is guided by decreasing the exposure, initial or continuous, of the contaminating warfare agent to personnel with the amount of decontaminating solution required under military operational conditions can be readily determined by those skilled in the art.
  • [0045]
    The foregoing summary, description, and examples of the present invention are not intended to be limiting, but are only exemplary of the inventive features that are defined in the claims.
Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3687815 *30 Jan 197029 Aug 1972Monsanto CoGermination of spores
US3956159 *25 Nov 197411 May 1976The Procter & Gamble CompanyStable concentrated liquid peroxygen bleach composition
US5296239 *25 Mar 199222 Mar 1994InteroxPeracetic acid compositions and process for obtaining these compositions
US5462692 *2 Dec 199131 Oct 1995Peroxid-Chemie GmbhStable solid acetylperoxyborate compounds
US5516486 *10 Mar 199314 May 1996Solvay Interox LimitedProcess for disinfecting coir plant growth media
US5612300 *20 Sep 199418 Mar 1997Von Bluecher; HassoMicroemulsion for the decontamination of articles contaminated with chemical warfare agents
US5759989 *10 Nov 19972 Jun 1998The Procter & Gamble CompanyStable aqueous emulsions of nonionic surfactants with a viscosity controlling agent
US6086785 *11 Dec 199611 Jul 2000Solvay Interox GmbhSolid peroxo compounds and peroxy compounds stabilized by coating
US6369288 *5 Jan 20009 Apr 2002The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The NavyChemical and biological warfare decontaminating solution using bleach activators
US6599715 *12 May 200029 Jul 2003The Regents Of The University Of CaliforniaReal time viability detection of bacterial spores
US6656919 *11 Jan 20022 Dec 2003Clarence L. BaughMethod and a product for the rapid decontamination and sterilization of bacterial endospores
US20030045767 *1 Feb 20026 Mar 2003The United States Of AmericaChemical and biological warfare decontaminating solution using bleach activators
US20040033269 *6 Aug 200219 Feb 2004Ecolab Inc.Critical fluid antimicrobial compositions and their use and generation
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7718594 *10 Oct 200718 May 2010The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The NavyAqueous based chemical and biological warfare decontaminating system for extreme temperature applications
US7829520 *10 Mar 20109 Nov 2010The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The NavyAqueous based chemical and biological warfare decontaminating system for extreme temperature applications
US82505252 Mar 200721 Aug 2012Pegasystems Inc.Proactive performance management for multi-user enterprise software systems
US833570428 Jan 200518 Dec 2012Pegasystems Inc.Methods and apparatus for work management and routing
US847915729 Dec 20092 Jul 2013Pegasystems Inc.Methods and apparatus for integration of declarative rule-based processing with procedural programming in a digital data-processing evironment
US85720597 Jul 200429 Oct 2013Colin P. BrittonSurveillance, monitoring and real-time events platform
US888048718 Feb 20114 Nov 2014Pegasystems Inc.Systems and methods for distributed rules processing
US892433518 Feb 201130 Dec 2014Pegasystems Inc.Rule-based user interface conformance methods
US895948031 May 201317 Feb 2015Pegasystems Inc.Methods and apparatus for integration of declarative rule-based processing with procedural programming in a digital data-processing environment
US918936128 Jun 201217 Nov 2015Pegasystems Inc.Proactive performance management for multi-user enterprise software systems
US919593630 Dec 201124 Nov 2015Pegasystems Inc.System and method for updating or modifying an application without manual coding
US927074329 Oct 201423 Feb 2016Pegasystems Inc.Systems and methods for distributed rules processing
US960408518 Jun 201328 Mar 2017Emergent Protective Products Canada UlcMethod and formulation for neutralizing toxic chemicals and materials
US96587352 Dec 201423 May 2017Pegasystems Inc.Methods and apparatus for user interface optimization
US967871920 May 201313 Jun 2017Pegasystems Inc.System and software for creation and modification of software
US970064424 Jul 200711 Jul 2017American Sterilizer CompanyOne part, solids containing decontamination blend composition
US20060036620 *8 Aug 200516 Feb 2006Metatomix, Inc.Methods and apparatus for visualizing relationships among triples of resource description framework (RDF) data sets
US20080241276 *31 Oct 20072 Oct 2008The Procter & Gamble CompanyPortable bio-chemical decontaminant system and method of using the same
US20090132232 *16 Jul 200821 May 2009Pegasystems Inc.Methods and apparatus for implementing multilingual software applications
US20090187060 *22 Jan 200823 Jul 2009E-Z-Em, Inc.Method and Formulation for Neutralizing Toxic Chemicals and Materials
Classifications
U.S. Classification510/375
International ClassificationC11D3/00, C11D1/75, C11D17/00, C11D3/39, A62D101/02, A62D3/38
Cooperative ClassificationA62D3/38, C11D17/0021, C11D1/75, A62D2101/02, C11D3/3947
European ClassificationC11D1/75, C11D17/00B3M, C11D3/39H, A62D3/38
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
29 Dec 2003ASAssignment
Owner name: NAVY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, AS REPRESENTED BY,
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:BROWN, JERRY S.;HODGE, RICHARD C.;MCCABE, MARGARET A.;AND OTHERS;REEL/FRAME:014847/0450;SIGNING DATES FROM 20030910 TO 20030921
Owner name: NAVY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, AS REPRESENTED BY,
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:BROWN, JERRY S.;HODGE, RICHARD C.;MCCABE, MARGARET A.;AND OTHERS;SIGNING DATES FROM 20030910 TO 20030921;REEL/FRAME:014847/0450
14 Oct 2009FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 4
31 Jan 2014REMIMaintenance fee reminder mailed
29 Apr 2014FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 8
29 Apr 2014SULPSurcharge for late payment
Year of fee payment: 7
12 Jul 2017FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 12