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Publication numberUS2004906 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication date11 Jun 1935
Filing date5 Mar 1934
Priority date5 Mar 1934
Publication numberUS 2004906 A, US 2004906A, US-A-2004906, US2004906 A, US2004906A
InventorsSimister Louis W
Original AssigneeJoseph Farese
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Pneumatic shoe
US 2004906 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 11, 1935. L. w. SIMISTER 2,004,906

PNEUMAT IG SHOE Filed March 5, 1934 17 INVENTOR Patented June 11, 1935 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE PNEUMATIC SHOE Louis W. Simister, New York, N. Y., assignor of one-half to Joseph Farese, New York, N. Y.

Application March 5, 1934, Serial No. 713,989

3 Claims.

. This invention relates to foot wear, such as shoes, boots and the like, and has as its principal object the provision of pneumatic means to support the foot, whereby an unusual degree of comfort is attained due to the elasticity of the air supported sole.

Another feature is the provision of an intermediate sole for shoes, containing an inflatable chamber co-extensive with the area of the foot.

A further aim of the invention is the provision in the inflatable chamber of another and similar inflatable chamber to extend over the shank of a shoe, to give additional elasticity to that part of the shoe and comfort to the foot.

Another feature of the invention is the provision of a rim of hard rubber or similar material about the air-filled intermediate sole, to prevent its breaking while in use.

Another purpose of the invention is the provision of a simple, inexpensive pneumatic support for shoes which may be attached to any shoe upon the market.

These and other useful and advantageous objects and advantages are obtained by the novel construction and combination of parts hereinafter described and shown in the accompanying drawing, forming a material part of this disclosure, and in which:

Figure 1 is a side elevational view of a conventional type of shoe, as made in accordance with the invention.

Figure 2 is a side elevational view of a portion of the upper part of a shoe, the outer sole and heel having been omitted.

Figure 3 is a bottom plan view of a shoe, part of the outer sole being broken away, to show the intermediate, air-filled sole.

Figure 4 is a transverse sectional view, taken on line 44 of Figure 3.

Figure 5 is a similar sectional view, taken on line 55 of Figure 3.

Figure 6 is a bottom plan view of the shoe.

Figure 7 is a transverse sectional view similar to Figure 4, showing the first step of a method of inflating the intermediate sole. I

Figure 8 is a view similar to Figure 7, showing the second step of a method of inflating the intermediate sole.

Figure 9 is a similar View, showing the intermediate sole filled with air.

Referring more in detail to the drawing, the reference character I 0 designates in general a conventional type of shoe, having an upper sole II, an intermediate, inflatable sole l2 and an outer or tread sole I3, to which is attached a heel I 4. i

The improvement consists in the insertion between the upper and the lower or tread sole, of a pneumatic sole, indicated generally by the nu- 5 meral [2 which consists of a rubber inlay of the shape of a sole. This rubber inlay is provided along its border with a frame or rim l5 of hard rubber or other suitable hard material. The rim l5 unites the upper sheet I6 and the lower sheet 10 ll of the inlay I2, intermediate of which is a chamber l8.

' In order to make the shoe still moreelastic and walking still more comfortable, there is provided within the chamber l8 a secondary chamber I9, 15

cemented or otherwise attached thereto midway between the sides of the chamber and extending over the instep of the shoe, to materially support the same.

One .method of inflating the chamber I8 is shown in Figures 7 8 and 9 of the drawing. The device may be made of an upper and lower part I6I'l respectively, forming a chamber I8 therebetween. The outer rim is securely molded about the device and made completely air tight. Only a small opening is left, into which a tube 20 is inserted which is connected to any convenient source of compressed air or the like, by which the sole is inflated. The secondarychamber I9 may be inflated in a similar manner.

In operation, the upper part of the shoeis first completed. Then the heel is nailed or otherwise secured to the tread sole I3. The heel, as may be seen in Figure 6, is somewhat smaller than the surface of the sole I3. The intermediate, air-filled sole is then placed upon the inner side of the tread sole, and both the intermediate sole and the tread sole are then secured to the upper sole II, by stitching or in any other suit able .manner.

The foregoing disclosure is to be regarded as descriptive and illustrative only, and not as restrictive or limitative of the invention, of which an embodiment may obviously be constructed containing many modifications without departing from the spirit'of the invention or from the scope of the appended claims;

Having thus described the invention, what is claimed as new, and desired to be secured by Letters Patent, is: V 50 1. A shoe sole having an inflatable chamber substantially co-extensive with the area of the surface of the sole, and a secondary inflatable chamber securely positioned therein in the plane of the first named member.

2. A shoe sole comprising a, rim, sheets of elastic material secured to the upper and lower surfaces of said rim to provide an air chamber intermediate the sheets and the rim, and a secondary 5 air chamber of elastic material securely positioned in said first named chamber below the v shank portion.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2600957 *19 Dec 194917 Jun 1952Frank BartisPneumatic arch support
US4115934 *11 Feb 197726 Sep 1978Hall John MLiquid shoe innersole
US4183155 *18 Aug 197815 Jan 1980Payne William HInsole for footwear having flexible envelope means
US5228156 *3 Aug 199220 Jul 1993John WangFluid operated device
US5365678 *22 Apr 199322 Nov 1994Kabushiki Kaisha HimikoMid-sole or sole of shoes
US5502901 *10 May 19942 Apr 1996Brown; Jeffrey W.Shock reducing footwear and method of manufacture
US5979078 *14 Oct 19979 Nov 1999Nike, Inc.Cushioning device for a footwear sole and method for making the same
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US645726216 Mar 20001 Oct 2002Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with a motion control device
US657149016 Mar 20003 Jun 2003Nike, Inc.Bladder with multi-stage regionalized cushioning
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US8141276 *21 Nov 200527 Mar 2012Frampton E. EllisDevices with an internal flexibility slit, including for footwear
US8205356 *21 Nov 200526 Jun 2012Frampton E. EllisDevices with internal flexibility sipes, including siped chambers for footwear
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US8291618 *18 May 200723 Oct 2012Frampton E. EllisDevices with internal flexibility sipes, including siped chambers for footwear
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US849432416 May 201223 Jul 2013Frampton E. EllisWire cable for electronic devices, including a core surrounded by two layers configured to slide relative to each other
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US856132324 Jan 201222 Oct 2013Frampton E. EllisFootwear devices with an outer bladder and a foamed plastic internal structure separated by an internal flexibility sipe
US856267816 May 201222 Oct 2013Frampton E. EllisSurgically implantable electronic and/or electromechanical prosthetic device enclosed in an inner bladder surrounded by an outer bladder and having an internal sipe between bladders
US856709527 Apr 201229 Oct 2013Frampton E. EllisFootwear or orthotic inserts with inner and outer bladders separated by an internal sipe including a media
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Classifications
U.S. Classification36/29, 36/153
International ClassificationA43B13/20, A43B13/18
Cooperative ClassificationA43B13/20
European ClassificationA43B13/20