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Publication numberUS20030136753 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 10/331,084
Publication date24 Jul 2003
Filing date27 Dec 2002
Priority date27 Dec 2001
Publication number10331084, 331084, US 2003/0136753 A1, US 2003/136753 A1, US 20030136753 A1, US 20030136753A1, US 2003136753 A1, US 2003136753A1, US-A1-20030136753, US-A1-2003136753, US2003/0136753A1, US2003/136753A1, US20030136753 A1, US20030136753A1, US2003136753 A1, US2003136753A1
InventorsFrederick Biesecker, Gregory Sprishen
Original AssigneeBiesecker Frederick N., Gregory Sprishen
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Child resistant cap
US 20030136753 A1
Abstract
A child resistant cap for a bottle includes a cover portion with a periphery having a wall with an internal surface surrounds the neck when the cap is positioned on the bottle. The bottle includes a neck, an opening and a rib with a gap. A finger and a locking lug extend from the internal surface. The finger has a length less than a length of the gap. The locking lug has a length greater than the length of the gap. The locking lug and the finger engage the rib and permit a rotation between a first position, where the finger and gap are aligned and a series of second positions, where the finger and gap are not aligned. A tab extends from the cover portion for applying a force to the cover when the cap is in the first position to remove the cap from the bottle.
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Claims(10)
I/we claim:
1. A child resistant cap for a bottle having a neck defining an opening, a rib extending almost entirely around a circumference of the neck except for a gap having a length, the rib being located adjacent the opening, said cap comprising:
a cover portion sized to cover said opening and having a periphery;
a wall extending from a first side of said periphery to surround said neck when the cap is positioned on the bottle, said wall having an internal surface;
a circumferentially extending finger located on said internal surface having a length that is less than the length of the gap;
a circumferentially extending locking lug located on an opposing side of said internal surface from said finger and having a length greater than the length of the gap, said locking lug and said finger engaging the rib of the bottle and guiding a rotary movement of the child resistant cap on the neck of the bottle between a first position wherein the finger and gap are aligned and a series of second positions wherein said finger and gap are not aligned; and
a tab extending from said cover portion away from said wall and adjacent said finger for applying a force generally perpendicularly and away from said cover portion when said cap is in said first position to readily remove said cap from the bottle.
2. The child resistant cap of claim 1 wherein said tab has a generally ring shape with a minor diameter defining an aperture which is large enough to permit passage of a human finger partially therethrough, said tab being pivotally connected to said cover adjacent to said finger such that said tab is permitted to pivot with respect to said cover from a resting position in facing engagement with said cover and a series of working positions spaced from said cover.
3. The child resistant cap of claim 2 wherein said tab is connected to said cover with a living hinge.
4. The child resistant cap of claim 2 wherein said tab has a terminal end which extends beyond said periphery of said cover when said tab is in a resting position in facing engagement with said cover.
5. The child resistant cap of claim 2 wherein said cover portion includes a depression extending under said tab when said tab is in said resting position, said depression being large enough to receive a tip of a human finger.
6. The child resistant cap of claim 5 wherein the tab is comprised of a main shaft extending from an attachment between the tab and the cover and a first finger and a second finger extending from the main shaft.
7. The child resistant cap of claim 1 wherein the child resistant cap is constructed of a unitarily molded, rigid polymeric material.
8. The child resistant cap of claim 1 wherein said tab has a generally thin ring shape with a major diameter slightly smaller than a diameter of said cover and a minor diameter defining an aperture large enough to accommodate the insertion of part of a human finger, said tab being pivotally connected to said cover near said periphery and adjacent to said finger to permit said tab to pivot from a resting position in facing engagement with said cover to a working position spaced from said cover.
9. The child resistant cap of claim 1 wherein said locking lug and said finger engage the rib such that the child resistant cap resists removal from the neck of the bottle when said finger is not in said first position.
10. The child resistant cap of claim 1 wherein said cap is generally T-shaped.
Description
CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

[0001] This application claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Application No. 60/345,679, filed Dec. 27, 2001, entitled “Child Resistant Cap.”

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

[0002] The present invention is directed to a child resistant cap for a bottle. The child resistant cap resists removal from a neck of the bottle when a locking lug and a finger on an inner surface of the cap are matingly engaged with a rib on an outer surface of the neck of the bottle. The child resistant cap may be removed from the neck of the bottle when the finger is aligned with a gap in the rib of the bottle. More particularly, the child resistant cap has a tab positioned on an outside cover portion of the cap in alignment with the finger such that a force applied by a user's thumb against the tab generally perpendicularly with respect to the top of the cap and upwardly/away from the cap aids in the removal of the cap from the bottle when the finger and the gap are aligned.

[0003] The general concept of a child resistant cap having a circumferentially extending finger and a circumferentially extending locking lug which mate with a rib having a gap on the neck of a bottle to resist removal of the child resistant cap from the bottle is generally well known. U.S. Pat. No. 3,627,160 discloses such a child resistant cap and is hereby incorporated by reference in its entirety. The finger of the child resistant cap is sized such that its length is less than the length of the gap and the locking lugs are sized such that their length is greater than the length of the gap. The finger, locking lug and gap are sized in this manner to resist removal of the child resistant cap from the neck of the bottle when the finger and gap are not in alignment. In contrast, the finger, locking lug and gap permit removal of the child resistant cap from the bottle when the finger and the gap are in alignment. A child resistant cap configured in this manner reduces the likelihood that a curious child may remove the cap from a bottle, which contains dangerous medicines or like hazardous materials and become injured after ingesting the hazardous contents.

[0004] However, child resistant caps configured in this manner may be difficult for certain individuals to remove from the neck of a bottle, such individuals may have a limited range of motion in their fingers due to arthritis, injury or age. These conventional child resistant caps may, in effect, deny access to the contents of the bottle to individuals with a limited range of motion in their fingers. The present invention provides a tab connected to the child resistant cap, which is relatively simple for an individual with limited range of motion in their fingers to manipulate. The tab may be used to apply a force to and remove the child resistant cap from the bottle when the finger and gap are in alignment.

[0005] More particularly, the child resistant cap of the present invention provides a ring shaped tab hingedly attached to the child resistant cap. The tab permits a user to slide a finger through an aperture in the tab to apply a force to the child resistant cap. A user initially aligns the finger of the child resistant cap with the gap on the neck of the bottle. The tab may then be rotated to a working position with the user's finger positioned within the aperture to disengage the child resistant cap from the neck of the bottle. The ring shaped tab eliminates the need for an individual with limited motor skills in their fingers to apply a force with the tip of one of their fingers to an edge of the child resistant cap adjacent to the finger when the finger and the gap are aligned. In a conventional child resistant cap configuration, similar to that of U.S. Pat. No. 3,627,160, the space for applying a removal force is strictly limited. The limited space and awkward direction in which a force must be applied to the conventional child resistant cap is difficult for an individual with limited motor skills to accomplish.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0006] Briefly stated, the present invention is directed to a child resistant cap for a bottle. The bottle has a neck defining an opening and a rib located adjacent to the opening extending almost entirely around a circumference of the neck except for a gap having a length. The child resistant cap is comprised of a cover portion having a periphery, which is sized to cover the opening of the bottle. A wall extending from a first side of the periphery surrounds the neck when the cap is positioned on the bottle. A circumferentially extending finger is located on an internal surface of the wall having a length that is less than the length of the gap. A circumferentially extending locking lug is located on an opposing side of the internal surface of the wall from the finger and has a length, which is greater than the length of the gap. The locking lug and the finger engage the rib of the bottle and guide a rotary movement of the child resistant cap on the neck of the bottle between a first position, where the finger and the gap are aligned and a series of second positions, where the finger and the gap are not aligned. A tab extends from the cover portion away from the wall and adjacent to the finger for applying a force generally perpendicularly and away from the cover when the cap is in the first position to readily remove the cap from the neck of the bottle.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE SEVERAL VIEWS OF THE DRAWINGS

[0007] The foregoing summary, as well as the following detailed description of the preferred embodiments of the invention, will be better understood when read in conjunction with the appended drawings. For the purpose of illustrating the invention, there is shown in the drawings an embodiment which is presently preferred. It should be understood, however, that the invention is not limited to the precise arrangements and instrumentalities shown. In the drawings:

[0008]FIG. 1 is an exploded perspective view of a child resistant cap positioned above the neck of a bottle in accordance with a first preferred embodiment of the present invention;

[0009]FIG. 2 is a perspective view of the child resistant cap, shown in FIG. 1, positioned on the neck of the bottle showing a tab pivoted out of facing engagement with the cap to a working position;

[0010]FIG. 3 is a cross-sectional view of the child resistant cap shown in FIG. 1 taken along line 3-3 of FIG. 1;

[0011]FIG. 4 is an exploded perspective view of a child resistant cap positioned above the neck of a bottle in accordance with a second preferred embodiment of the present invention;

[0012]FIG. 5 is a perspective view of the child resistant cap, shown in FIG. 4, positioned on the neck of the bottle showing the tab pivoted out of facing engagement with the cap to a working position;

[0013]FIG. 6 is a cross-sectional view of the child resistant cap shown in FIG. 4 taken along line 6-6 of FIG. 4; and

[0014]FIG. 7 is a perspective view of a child resistant cap in accordance with a third preferred embodiment of the present invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

[0015] Certain terminology is used in the following description for convenience only and is not limiting. The words “right,” “left,” “lower” and “upper” designate directions in the drawings to which reference is made. The words “inwardly” and “outwardly” refer to directions toward and away from, respectively, the geometric center of a child resistant cap and designated parts thereof. The terminology includes the words above specifically mentioned, derivatives thereof and words of similar import. Additionally, the word “a,” as used in the claims and in the corresponding portions of the specification, means “at least one.”

[0016] Referring to the drawings in detail, wherein like numerals indicate like elements throughout, there is shown in FIGS. 1 through 3 a first preferred embodiment of the child resistant cap, generally designated 10, for covering an opening 13 of a bottle 12 in accordance with the present invention. The bottle 12 has a neck 12 a defining an opening 13 with a rib 12 b located adjacent to the opening 13 which extends almost entirely around a circumference of the neck 12 a except for a gap 12 c having a length L1.

[0017] In the first preferred embodiment, the child resistant cap 10 is constructed of a unitarily molded, rigid polymeric material. One skilled in the art will realize that the child resistant cap 10 is not limited to constructions using rigid polymeric materials and may be constructed of any material which may take on the general shape and perform the functions of the child resistant cap 10 as described hereinafter, such as metal, wood or like materials.

[0018] In the first preferred embodiment, the child resistant cap 10 includes a cover portion 14 having a periphery 14 a, which is sized to cover the opening 13 of the bottle 12. A wall 16 extends from a first side of the periphery 14 a to surround the neck 12 a when the child resistant cap 10 is positioned on the bottle 12. The wall 16 has an internal surface 16 a. A circumferentially extending finger 18 is located on the internal surface 16 a. The finger 18 has a length (not shown) that is less than the length L1 of the gap 12 c. The external surface 16 b of the wall 16 includes a series of vertically extending ridges 16 c which facilitate gripping the cap 10 for purposes of rotating the same.

[0019] A circumferentially extending locking lug 20 is located on an opposing side of the internal surface 16 a from the finger 18 and has a length that is greater than the length L1 of the gap 12 c. The locking lug 20 and the finger 18 engage the rib 12 b of the bottle 12 and guide a rotary movement of the child resistant cap 10 on the neck 12 a of the bottle 12 between a first position, where the finger 18 and the gap 12 c are aligned (as shown in FIGS. 1 and 2) and a series of second positions (not shown), where the finger 18 and the gap 12 c are not aligned. The second positions would be any relative position between the child resistant cap 10 and the neck 12 a of the bottle 12, except for the first position. The locking lug 20 and the finger 18 engage the rib 12 b such that the child resistant cap 10 resists removal from the neck 12 a of the bottle 12 when the finger 18 is not in the first position. The finger 18 and the locking lug 20 of the child resistant cap 10 are able to resist removal from the neck 12 a of the bottle 12, in the second positions, by engaging a lower surface 22 of the rib 12 b with an upper surface 24 of the finger 18 and the locking lug 20. In the second positions, an opposing force is generated between the upper surface 24 of the finger 18 and the locking lug 20 and the lower surface 22 of the rib 12 b which resists removal of the child resistant cap 10 from the neck 12 a when a force is applied to the child resistant cap 10 in a direction away from the bottle 12.

[0020] For example, the child resistant cap 10 may be positioned on the neck 12 a such that an upper surface 24 of the finger 18 is engaged with the lower surface 22 opposite the gap 12 c and the locking lug 20 is engaged with the lower surface 22 while spanning the gap 12 c. In this position, a force applied to the child resistant cap 10 away from the bottle 12 is resisted by an equal and opposite force created between the rib 12 b and the combination of the finger 18 and the locking lug 10. The finger 18, locking lug 20 and rib 12 b are able to avoid removal of the child resistant cap 10 from the bottle 12 until the unlikely event wherein the finger 18, locking lug 20 or rib 12 b break or the wall 16 or the neck 12 a flexes sufficiently to permit the finger 18 or the locking lug 20 to slide over the rib 12 b. In the above described manner, the child resistant cap 10 resists removal from the neck 12 a of the bottle 12 in the second positions.

[0021] In the first preferred embodiment, a tab 26 extends from the cover portion 14 away from the wall 16 adjacent the finger 18 for applying a force generally perpendicularly and away from the cover portion 14 when the child resistant cap 10 is in the first position to readily remove the child resistant cap 10 from the bottle 12. That is, the tab 26 is positioned on the child resistant cap 10 adjacent the finger 18 such that the force readily removes the child resistant cap 10 from the bottle 12. The tab 26 may be positioned anywhere on an opposing side of the cover portion 14 or the wall 16 from the locking lug 20 as long as a pivoting moment is created between a base 26 a of the tab 26 and the locking lug 20 when the locking lug 20 is engaged with the rib 12 b. The pivoting moment urges the finger 18 to slide through the gap 12 c thus disengaging the child resistant cap 10 from the bottle.

[0022] In the first preferred embodiment, the tab 26 has a generally ring shape with a minor diameter D1 defining an aperture 27, which is large enough to permit passage of a human finger (not shown) partially therethrough. The tab 26, is preferably, pivotally connected to the cover portion 14 adjacent to the finger 18 such that the tab 26 pivots with respect to the cover portion 14 from a resting position in facing engagement with the cover portion 14 (see FIG. 1) and a series of working positions (see FIG. 2) spaced from the cover portion 14. In the preferred embodiment, the minor diameter D1 is approximately one inch (1″) but may be smaller or larger to accommodate larger or smaller bottles 12 without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention.

[0023] In the first preferred embodiment, the tab 26 is connected to the cover portion 14 with a living hinge 28 adjacent to the finger 18. The living hinge 28 permits a user to pivot the tab 26 from the resting position to the working positions, thereby taking full advantage of a force that a user may apply to the tab 26 to dislodge the child resistant cap 10 from the bottle 12 when the child resistant cap 10 is in the first position. The use of the living hinge 28 simplifies the unitary molding process of the child resistant cap 10 because the living hinge 28 material is compatible with conventional molding processes. Unitarily molding the child resistant cap 10 reduces manufacturing costs and complexity by simplifying the production of the child resistant cap 10.

[0024] However, one skilled in the art will realize from this disclosure that the child resistant cap 10 is not limited to the use of a living hinge 28 to pivot the tab 26 from the resting position to the working positions. The living hinge 28 may be comprised of a door like hinge, butterfly hinge or any like hinge or spring like material (not shown) which permits the tab 26 to pivot to and from the resting position and working positions. In addition, the tab 26 may be rigidly secured to the cover portion 14 at any position where a pivoting moment is created between the base 26 a, and the locking lug 20 engaged with the rib 12 b, when a force is applied to the tab 26 without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention.

[0025] In the first preferred embodiment, the tab 26 has a terminal end 30, which extends beyond the periphery of the cover portion 14 when the tab 26 is in the resting position. The terminal end 30 has a hooked section 30 a which grips an overhang 14 a of the cover portion to removably secure the tab 26 in a first groove 34 in facing engagement with the cover portion 14 in the resting position. The extension of the terminal end 30 beyond the periphery of the cover portion 14 permits a user to slide a finger underneath the terminal end 30 to disengage the hooked section 30 a from the overhang 14 a by applying a force to a lower surface of the terminal end 30 away from the cover portion 14. Once the tab 26 is disengaged from the resting position, the user is able to pivot the tab 26 to one of the working positions and position the child resistant cap 10 in the first position. The child resistant cap 10 is disengaged from the bottle 12 when the finger 18 slides through the gap 12 c by rotating at an opposing side of the neck 12 a at the engagement of the locking lug 20 and the rib 12 b. The use of the terminal end 30, the tab 26 and the living hinge 28 permits persons having limited motor skills with their fingers due to age, injury or arthritis to readily remove the child resistant cap 10 from the bottle 12 compared to the arduous removal of a conventional child resistant cap from a bottle.

[0026] In the first preferred embodiment, the tab 26 has a generally thin ring shape with a major diameter D2 which is slightly smaller than a cover portion diameter D and a minor diameter D1, which defines an aperture 27 large enough to accommodate the insertion of part of a human finger. In the first preferred embodiment, the major diameter D2 is approximately one and two-tenths inches (1.2″) and is secured in the first groove 34 in its resting position. The diameter D is approximately one and four-tenths inches (1.4″) in the preferred embodiment. The tab 26 is shielded by the first groove 34 from access to any portion of the tab 26 except for at its terminal end 30 in the resting position. In this manner, the tab 26 is protected from being inadvertently dislodged from its resting position. One skilled in the art will realize that the child resistant cap 10 is not limited to the dimensions disclosed above and may be sized appropriately to accommodate larger or smaller bottles 12 without departing from the spirit and scope of the present invention.

[0027] In use, the child resistant cap 10 is placed on the neck 12 a of the bottle 12 by aligning the finger 18 and the gap 12 c in the first position (as shown in FIGS. 1 and 2). The child resistant cap 10 may then be rotated through a series of second positions (not shown) where the finger 18 and the gap 12 c are not aligned. The rotation of the child resistant cap 10 is guided by the slidable mating of the upper surface 24 of the finger 18 and locking lug 20 to the lower surface 22 of the rib 12 b. In addition, the slidable mating of the finger 18 and the locking lug 20 to the rib 12 b, resists removal of the child resistant cap 10 from the bottle 12 when the child resistant cap 10 is in one of the second positions. The finger 18, locking lug 20 and rib 12 b resist removal of the child resistant cap 10 from the bottle 12 by generating an opposing force between the upper surface 24 of the finger 18 and the locking lug 20 and the lower surface 22 of the rib 21 b when a force is applied to the child resistant cap 10 in a direction away from the bottle 12.

[0028] In the first preferred embodiment, the child resistant cap 10 is removed from the bottle 12 by initially aligning the finger 18 and the gap 12 c in the first position. A user then slides a finger underneath the terminal end 30 of the tab 26 and applys a force away from the bottle 12 to disengage the hook section 30 a of the tab 26 from the overhang 14 a of the cover portion 14. Once the tab 26 is disengaged from the resting position, a user pivots the tab 26 about the living hing 28 to a working position generally perpendicular to the upper surface of the cover portion 14. A users finger (not shown) is then inserted through the aperture 27 in the tab 26 and pulls on an inner surface of the tab 26 defined by the minor diameter D1. Pulling on the tab 26, creates a pivoting moment between the base 26 a of the tab 26 and the locking lug 20. The pivoting moment causes the finger 18 to slide through the gap 12 c, thereby disengaging the child resistant cap 10 from the bottle 12. One skilled in the art will realize that the above described movements of a user's fingers for disengaging the child resistant cap 10 from the bottle 12 are simpler and require less brute strength than the removal of a conventional child resistant cap as described in U.S. Pat. No. 3,627,160. Therefore, the first preferred embodiment is particularly suited for use by persons having limited motor skills in their fingers due to age, injury or arthritis.

[0029] In FIGS. 4-6 there is shown a second preferred embodiment of a child resistant cap 10′. The child resistant cap 10′ in accordance with the second preferred embodiment is very similar to the first preferred embodiment. Accordingly, a complete description of like elements is not repeated herein. Instead, like elements between the first and second embodiments have been given the prime designation in the second preferred embodiment. Only the differences between the first and second embodiments are described below.

[0030] In the second preferred embodiment, the cover portion 14′ includes a depression 36 extending under the tab 26′ in the resting position. The depression 36 is large enough to receive a tip of a human finger under the tab 26′ to disengage the tab 26′ from its resting position. Disengaging the tab 26′ from the resting position permits a user to pivot the tab 26′ from its resting position to one the working positions.

[0031] In use, in the second preferred embodiment, the tab 26′ is releasably positioned in a second groove 38 of the cover portion 14′ in the resting position by a tab lock 40, which circumferentially extends from a wall 38 a of the second groove 38. The tab lock 40 releasably engages an upper surface of the tab 26′ when the tab 26′ is in the resting position. A user releases the tab 26′ from its resting position by sliding a finger (not shown) into the depression 36 and under the tab 26′ and applying a force to the lower surface of the tab 26′ away from the bottle 12, thereby forcing the tab 26′ past the tab lock 40. The tab lock 40 and the tab 26′ are flexible and are sized such that a user may readily disengage the tab 26′ from its resting position with a minimal amount of finger force. The tab 26′ may then be pivoted to one of the working positions and the child resistant cap 10′ may be disengaged from the bottle 12 as described above in connection with the first preferred embodiment.

[0032] In the second preferred embodiment, the child resistant cap 10′ is removed from the bottle 12′ in much the same manner as described above in the first preferred embodiment. The difference between the first preferred embodiment and the second preferred embodiment is the manner in which the tabs 26 and 26′ are disengaged from their resting positions. In the second preferred embodiment, the tab 26′ is removably secured in the second groove 38 on an upper surface of the cover portion 14′ by the mating of the tab lock 40 with an upper surface of the tab 26′. A user removes the tab 26′ from the resting position by inserting a finger (not shown) into the depression 36 under the tab 26′ and applying a force at the lower surface of the tab 26′ away from the bottle 12. The user then pivots the tab 26′ about the living hinge 28′ to a working position generally perpendicular to the cover portion 14′. The child resistant cap 10′ is then disengaged from the bottle 12′ in the same manner as described in the first preferred embodiment. One skilled in the art will realize that the above described movements of a user's fingers for disengaging the child resistant cap 10′ from the bottle 12′ are simpler and require less brute strength than the removal of a conventional child resistant cap from a bottle as described in U.S. Pat. No. 3,627,160. Therefore, the second preferred embodiment is particularly suited for use by persons having limited motor skills with their fingers due to age, injury or arthritis.

[0033] In FIG. 7 there is shown a third preferred embodiment of a child resistant cap 10″. The child resistant cap 10″ in accordance with the third preferred embodiment is very similar to the first and second preferred embodiments of the invention. Accordingly, a complete description of like elements is not repeated herein. Instead, like elements between the first and second embodiments have been given a double prime designation in the third preferred embodiment. Only differences between the third preferred embodiment and the first and second preferred embodiments are described below.

[0034] In the third preferred embodiment, the tab 26″ includes a first finger 26 c and a second finger 26 d extending perpendicularly from a main shaft 26 e. Disengaging the tab 26″ from the resting position permits a user to pivot the tab 26″ from its resting position to one of the working positions.

[0035] In use, in the third preferred embodiment, the tab 26″ is pivoted to one of the working positions and the child resistant cap 10″ is aligned for removal from the bottle 12″ (not shown) as described above in the first preferred embodiment. A user then positions a finger (not shown) on either side of the main shaft 26 e adjacent the first finger 26 c and second finger 26 d. An upward force is applied to the first finger 26 c and the second finger 26 d, thereby creating a moment, which releases the child resistant cap 26″ from the bottle 12″ as described above in the first preferred embodiment. One skilled in the art will realize that the above described movements of a user's fingers for disengaging the child resistant cap 10″ from the bottle 12″ are simpler and require less brute strength than the removal of a conventional child resistant cap from a bottle as described in U.S. Pat. No. 3,627,160. Therefore, the third preferred embodiment is particularly suited for use by persons having limited motor skills with their fingers due to age, injury or arthritis. U.S. Provisional Application No. 60/345,679, filed Dec. 27, 2001, is incorporated by reference herein in its entirety.

[0036] Those skilled in the art will appreciate that changes could be made to the embodiments described above without departing from the broad inventive concept thereof. It is understood, therefore, that this invention is not limited to the particular embodiments disclosed. This disclosure is intended to cover modifications within the spirit and scope of the present invention as defined by the appended claims.

[0037] It will be appreciated by those skilled in the art that changes could be made to the embodiments described above without departing from the broad inventive concept thereof. It is understood, therefore, that this invention is not limited to the particular embodiments disclosed, but it is intended to cover modifications within the spirit and scope of the present invention as defined by the appended claims.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7546931 *8 Jul 200516 Jun 2009Becton, Dickinson And CompanyFlip top cap
US766138426 Jan 200516 Feb 2010Marc J MatayaClosure cap for a container having time-date indicators
US7717284 *8 Jul 200518 May 2010Becton, Dickinson And CompanyFlip top cap
US8251251 *18 Jan 200728 Aug 2012Astrazeneca AbContainer
WO2012004667A1 *5 Jul 201112 Jan 2012Obrist Closures Switzerland GmbhA snap on closure with a pull member
Classifications
U.S. Classification215/224, 215/206, 215/305
International ClassificationB65D51/24, B65D50/06
Cooperative ClassificationB65D51/243, B65D50/061, B65D50/069
European ClassificationB65D50/06B, B65D51/24D, B65D50/06H4
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
25 Mar 2003ASAssignment
Owner name: DRUG PLASTICS & GLASS COMPANY, INC., PENNSYLVANIA
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:BIESECKER, FREDERICK N.;SPRISHEN, GREGORY;REEL/FRAME:013878/0815
Effective date: 20030310