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Publication numberUS1842623 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication date26 Jan 1932
Filing date4 Aug 1926
Priority date4 Aug 1926
Publication numberUS 1842623 A, US 1842623A, US-A-1842623, US1842623 A, US1842623A
InventorsMoore John V
Original AssigneeMoore Fabric Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Semisoft collar and fabric for making the same
US 1842623 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

J. v. MOORE 1,842,623

SEMISOFT COLLAR AND FABRIC FOR MAKING THE SAME Jan. 26, 1932.

Filed Aug. 4, 1926 Patented Jan. 26, 1932 UNITED. STATES 'ATENT OFFICE.

JOHN V. MOORE, OF PAVVTUCKET, RHODE ISLAND, ASSIGNOR TO MOORE FABRIC COMPANY, OF PAWTUCKET, RHODE ISLAND, A CORPORATION OF RHODE ISLAND SEMISOF'I COLLAR AND FABRIC FOR LEAKING THE SAME Application filed August 4, 1926. Serial No. 127,124.

. This invention relates to asemi-soft collar in which the desired. curvilinear shape of the article is accomplished mainly or entirely by providing distinctive weaves for different portions of the fabric, all woven in one piece but having quite different shrinkage values.

This application is a companion application to a case recently filed by me, Serial No. 125,545, filed July 28, 1926, in which the 0 broad invention. is fully set V forth and claimed, and in which specific claims are made to one form of the invention in which phe filling threads run lengthwise of the colar.

It is the object of my present invention to provide a semi-soft collar of the general type above described but in which the warp threads run lengthwise of the collar, and in =which the distinctive weaves formstrips running lengthwise or warpwise of the fabric. In this form of my invention the filling is commonly straight and uniform throughout the length of the fabric but the'manner of interlacing the warp andfilling threads is varied in different parts of thewidth of the fabric, and the warp threads are so manipulated by the harnesses that strips of fabric are woven side by side which have very different shrinkage values. My invention further relates to arrangements and combinations of parts which will be'hereinafterdescribed and more particularly pointed out in the appended claims- A. preferred form of my invention is shown in the drawings, in which Fig. lis a plan view of a portion of my improvedfabric; 1 V I i Figs. 2, 3 and 4 are detail sectional views, taken longitudinallyof the fabric at different portions of its width, as indicated by the lines 22; 3 3 and 4.@ in Fig. 1;.

Fig. 5'is a plan view of a portion of the fabric after shrinkage; i

Fig. 6 indicates the curvilinear formv of a collar cut from the fabric; and

Fig. 7 is a transverse sectional view of a collar formed from the fabric- Referring tofithe drawings, I have indicated a fabric woven in longitudinallyextending strips providing-a face or flap portion 10,'a fold portion 11, and aband portion 12. As the fabric is woven, these several portions of the fabric lie side by side flat and straight as indicated in Fig. 1. The different portions are so woven, however, that they shape indicated in Fig. 5.

This varlatlon 1n shrlnkage values may be accomplished by a number of different combinations of weaves, and in Figs. 2, 3 and 4, I have illustrated one such combination.

The face or flap portion 10 of the fabric is preferably formed with a balanced weave in which the interlacings of the warp and filling appear equallyv on bothfaces of the fabric. In Fig.2 I have shown a three and one weave for the face portion, in which each warp threadW floats on the upper or lower surface for three picks and is then bound under or over a single pick of filling F. A substantially equal number of warp threads are caused to float on eachsurface,

so that a firm fabric is produced which will lie flat aftershrinkage.

For the fold portion I provide a firm but very much unbalanced weave, so that a natural hinge action will be produced. As shown in the drawings, I have provided a one-up and three-down weave, in which each warp thread W passes over a single filling thread F andthen remains .on the lower face of the fabric while the next three picks of filling are inserted. It will be seen that all of the warp threads thus float on the lower face of the fabric, while the filling threads are crowded together atthe upper face of the fabric. Th s fabric upon shrinkage. tends to buckle or fold as a hinge, forming a sharp curve indicated in Fig. 7.

The band portion 12 of the fabric is woven with a loose or relatively open unbalanced weave as indicated in Fig. 4, where I have shown a five-up and three-down weave. In this figure it will be seen that each warp thread W passes through the fabric in the same direction only once in eight picks, and that it floats on the upper surface of the fabric for five picks and is then bound under for three picks. This loose or relatively open Weave provides a soft finish for the band and also forms a material which will shrink very decidedly during the processes of finishing. Furthermore, the shrinkage is more "pronounced on the upper face of the fabric where the longer floats occur, causing therfahric to assume the concave appearance shownin Fig. 7. This concave shape adds greatly to the appearance of the finished collar and causes theband to lie closely and smoothly against the inside of the face portion or flap.

While the weaves shown in Figs. 2, 3 and 4 are particularly well adapted for the purpose of my invention, the weaves may obviously be changed within rather wide limits. The weave at the fold portion for instance, may be'changed from a one-up and threedewn to a one-up and two-down weave, which will produce an even sharper hinge or fold faction. The weave of the band portion 'may be changed to a six-up and two down or a seven-up and one-down weave instead of the five-up and three-down weave shown in F ig, 4, and if such changes are made the relative shrinkage may be made even more roiibunced and a more marked concave effect in the band may be produced. I It is also within the scope of my invention to use warp threads having distinctive characteristics in the diiferent portions of the fabric, for instance, the warp used in the face portion 10 and the fold portion 11 may be a relatively soft or slack twisted warp, while the warp used in the band portion 12 may be a hard or tight twisted warp which will have a substantially greater shrinkage than the softer warp. By thus using different types of warp-in different portions of the fabric, the relative shrinkage may be made more pronounced. V

I commonly use a uniform reed spacing of warp threads across the entire width of the fabric, but under special conditions I may find it advisable to vary the spacing.

In the production of collars from my improved fabric, the collar may be cut from the straight fabric as indicated in dotted lines in Fig. 1, but preferably the fabric is first through the shrinking and finishing proc- 'assuming a curved form as shown in Fig. 5 before the collar is cut therefrom.

After the collar is cut from the fabric, however, an additional shrinkage takes place as soon as the portions of the collar are freed from the adjacent fabric.

By suitably selecting the weaves and by using the proper weights and kinds of warp and filling, a single ply collar may be woven straight and flat in a single piece which, upon shrinking and finishing. will assume the exact curvilinear shape and fold necessary to produce a satisfactory collar.

In the following claims I use the term active warps to designate such warps as are actively used in weaving the exposed face of the fabric, as distinguished from stuffer, hinder, or re-inforcing warps.

Having thus described my invention and the advantages thereof, I do not wish to be limited to the details herein disclosed otherwise thanv as set forth in the claims. What I claim is 1- 1. A single ply semi-soft collar havin the warp threads extending lengthwise o the collar and having the band and face portions of the collar woven in one piece and comprising filling threads and active warp threads only, said parts bein woven with straight warp and straight lling threads but in distinctive weaves effective to cause a collar cut therefrom to take a curvilinear form upon shrinkage and finishing.

2. A single ply semi-soft collar having the warp threads extending lengthwise of the collar and having the band and face portions of the collar woven in one piece and comprising filling threads and active warp threads only, and having the warp and filling threads difi'erently interlaced in said two portions, so that the band will shrink more readily and to a greater extent than the face portion.

3. A single ply semi-soft collar having the warp threads extending lengthwise of the collar and having the band and face portions of the collar woven in one piece and cornprisin filling threads and active warp threa only, said parts being woven with a greater number of interlacings of the warp and filling threads per unit of surface area in the face portion and with a less number in the band portion, whereby said band portion will have greater shrinkage during the finishing of the fabric.

' 4. A single ply semi-soft collar having the warp threads extending lengthwise of the collar and having the band and face portions of the collar woven in one piece and comprising filling threads and active warp threads only, said parts being woven with relatively slack twisted warp in the face portion and with relatively tight twisted warp in the band portion and having said warps differently interlaced in the band and face portions, producing greatershrinkage in the band portion on finishing.

5. A single ply fabric for semi-soft collars so woven that the warp threads will extend lengthwise of the collar, said fabric being woven in successive strips extending lengthwise of the fabric and designed for band, fold, and face port-ions respectively, said portions each comprising filling threads and active warp threads only and each having a distinctive weave producing a different shrinkage ratio.

6. A single ply fabric for semi-soft collars so woven that the warp threads will extend lengthwise of the collar, said fabric being woven in successive strips extending lengthwise of the fabric and designed for band, fold, and face portions having distinctive weaves which produce different shrinka e results, said portions each comprising filling threads and active warp threads only and said fold portion being of the full strength of the other portions but having its elements so interlaced as to produce a natural hinge effect on folding for use.

7'. A single ply semi-soft collar having the Warp threads extending lengthwise of the collar and having band, fold and face portions woven with distinctive Weaveshaving different shrinkage characteristics, said portions each comprising filling threads and active warp threads only and said fold por tion, being as firmly woven as said face and band portions but with an excessively unbalanced weave with the filling crowded together at the outer surface of the fabric, producing a marked hinge effect upon folding after shrinkage.

In testimony whereof I have hereunto affixed my signature.

JOHN V. MOORE.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3247872 *17 Apr 196426 Apr 1966Johnson & JohnsonDiaper
US3291162 *23 Oct 196513 Dec 1966Johnson & JohnsonDiaper
US3339548 *27 Apr 19645 Sep 1967Kendall & CoDiaper contoured by shrinking
Classifications
U.S. Classification139/385.5, 2/129
International ClassificationA41B5/00
Cooperative ClassificationA41B5/00
European ClassificationA41B5/00