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Publication numberUS1841889 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication date19 Jan 1932
Filing date6 Jul 1928
Priority date4 May 1928
Publication numberUS 1841889 A, US 1841889A, US-A-1841889, US1841889 A, US1841889A
InventorsKarl Grunwald
Original AssigneeKarl Grunwald
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Tobacco moistening device
US 1841889 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 19, 1932. K. ,GRUNWALD 1,841,889

TOBACCO MOISTENING DEVICE Filed July 6, 1928 I ma 4 Patented Jan. 19, 1932 PATENT OFFICE nan entmwann. or nnnnm-wimrnnsnonr, onamm TOBACCO MOISTENING: DEVICE Application filed July 6, 1928, Serial 1T0.

Tobacco moistening devices are known, m which a layer capable of retaining moisture is wrapped up in a material which is impervious to moisture. The known constructional forms have the disadvantage that the water of the moisture retaining layer easily comes in contact with the tobacco or the cigarettes, so that the cigarettes become damaged.

According to the present invention the 1 layer which is impervious to moisture projects so far beyond the moisture retaining layer at all those edges or cross-sectional areas, at which it can give ofi moisture, that the moisture given off cannot be transmitted directly to the tobacco but only to the air of the container in which the tobacco is stored. In order that a considerable amount of moisture shall be given off, perforations may be provided in the tobacco moistening device, the edges of the material which is impervious to moisture being slightly turned up so as to cover the moisture retaining layer to a certain degree. A metal foil may suitably be used as the material which is impervious to moisture. In place of metal foils, materials sprayed with metal or any other non-porous flexible substances may be used as the impervious material.

Various constructional examples of the present invention are shown in the accompanying drawings, in which,

Fig. 1 represents an insertion, in which the moisture is given off only at the edges of the moisture retaining layer,

Fig. 2 a section on line IIII of Fig. 1,

Fig. 3 a view of an insertion which is pgrforated on one side and opened at one e ge Fig. 4: a section on line IV-IV of Fig. 3,

Fig. 5 an insertion perforated on both sides Fig. 6 a section on line VI-VI of Fig. 5,

F i 7 a section through another constructiona form.

The insertion consists of a moisture retaining layer 1 of moistened blotting or absorbent paper and a sheath 2 of metal 011 or the hke which is impervious to water. The layer 1 is wrapped up in the sheath 2 so that the insertion is in contact with the 290,774, and in Germany mike, 192s.

outer air either only at the lateral edges, as shown in Figs. 1 and 2, or additionally as regards the superficial areas of the perforations 3, which may be of any shape, as shown in Figs. 3-7. The given off moisture must not directly reach the contents of the container into which the insertion is placed after'the blotting paper has been moistened, but may only be imparted to the air in the container, 'for instance cigarette box. For this purpose the sheath 2 has an edge 4 projecting beyond the sheet of blotting paper. When the insertion is laid on the top of the cigarettes contained in the box, only that side which is the lower one when it is being inserted need so project, as is assumed in Figs. 1-6. If, however, the insertion is to be laid between difierent layers of cigarettes, the upper covering sheet 2 must also be widened so that in this case as well an edge 5 will be produced (Fig. 7).

According to Figs. 1 and 2 moisture is only given off through the lateral edges of the blotting paper, therefore relatively slowly. When it is desired that the water shall be imparted more rapidly to the air the covering layer and the blotting paper is perforated, either as shown in Figs. 3 and 4, only the lower covering layer and the blotting paper being perforated, orlso that the holes extend right through as in Figs. 5-7. In both cases provision must be made that no moisture can reach the cigarettes at the perforated areas. For effecting this, whenthe perforations are being made, the material of the covering layer is bent up to form a rim 7 which partially covers the edges of the perforations in the blotting paper and thus prevents drops of liquid trickling out directly on to the cigarettes. When the perforati ons are made by stamping, these edges will as a rule be bent up in any case. It is then only necessary to provide that the perforations are stamped out from the side on which is the broader covering layer, the edges of which project beyond the blotting paper, and the insertions must of course be placed in a corresponding manner into the cigarette box.

If the insertion is to be plac'edbetween the ci arettes, it is necessagy after the holes have en punched to ben in the edges of the perforations on the upper covering plate in a separate 0 ration, so that turned in ed 8 are pro uced (see Fi 7).

Ir i the constructional examp es shown, only the two longitudinal edges of the sheet of blotting paper are exposed for giving off moisture to the air, the two transverse edges being covered by the metal foil being bent over. If the blotting paper be fixed 1n the insertion in a different manner, the other edges might also remain open. Thus, for instance, 1n order that all the edges of the moisture retaining layer shall be open, metal foils might be stuck on the blotting paper by means of a waterproofing adhesive, in which case a further insulating layer formed by the adhesive would be produced, which would prevent the metal corroding. In this case it would of course also be necessa for the covering layer to project beyon the sheet of blotting paper at the side of the insertion which is to rest against the cigarettes or atboth sides.

The invention is more particularly intended for insertion in cigarette boxes, but may of course, be used when storing other tobacco manufactures. It may also be used for insertion in cigarette cases in which case it is only necessary to provide suitable devices, for instance sprin clamps, for holding the insertion firmly in axe cover of the case.

The insertion is always placed in the box or case in question, after the sheet of blotting pa er has been moistened.

at I claim is: V

1. In a self-contained tobacco-moistener adapted for use as an integral unit, the combination with an apertured moisture'retaining layer, of a sheath of moisture-impervious material adapted to embrace both surfaces of said layer with exposure of opposite edges of the same and to project be 0nd the exposed edges of said layer on at east one side thereof, the said sheath having apertures adjacent to at least one surface of the embraced layer, which correspond to, and are slightly smaller than, the apertures in the said layer, so that an overlap is formed around the contour of each aperture in the embraced layer, said overlap bein bent over the edge surfaces of the perforations in the embraced layer so as partiall to cover them.

2. In a self-contained to acco-moistener adapted for use as an integral unit, the combination with an apertured moisture-retaining la er, of a sheath of moisture-impervious material ada ted to embrace both surfaces of said layer with exposure of a pair of opposite edges of the same and to project beyond the exposed edges of said layer on at least one side thereof, the said sheath having apertures adjacent to at least one surface of the embraced layer which correspond to, and I are slightly sma er than, the apertures 1n the said layer, so that an overlap is formed around the contour of each aperture in the embraced layer, said overlap being bent over the edge surfaces of the perforations in the embraced layer so as partially to cover them.

3. In a self-contained tobacco-moistener adapted for use as an integral unit, the combination with an apertured moisture-retain- 1ng layer, of a sheath of flexible moistureimpervious material adapted to embrace both surfaces of said layer with exposureof opposite edges of the same and to project beyond the exposed edges of said layer on at east one side thereof, the said sheath having apertures adjacent to at least one surface of the embraced layer, which correspond to, and are slightly smaller than, the apertures in the said layer, so that an overlap is formed around the contour of each aperture in the embraced layer, said overlap being bent over the edge surfaces of the perforations in the embraced layer so as partlall to cover them.

4. 'In a self-contained to acco-moistener adapted for use as an integral unit, the combination with an apertured moisture-retaining layer, of a sheath of flexible moistureimpervious material adapted to embrace both surfaces of said la er with exposure of a pair of opposite e ges of the same and to project beyond the exposed edges of said layer on at least one side thereof, the said sheath havin apertures adjacent to at least one surface 0 the embraced layer, which correspond to, and are slightly smaller than, the apertures in the said layer, so that an overlap is formed around the contour of each aperture in the embraced layer, said overlap being bent over the edge surfaces of the perforatlons in the embraced layer so as partially to cover them.

5. In a self-contained tobacco-moistener adapted for use as an integral unit, the combination with an apertured moisture-retaining layer, of a thin metallic sheath adapted to embrace both surfaces of said layer with exposure of oppositeedges of the same and to project beyond the ex osed ed es of said layer on at least one si e thereo the said sheath having apertures adjacent to at least one surface of the embraced layer, which correspond to, and are slightly smaller than, the apertures in the said layer, so that an overlap is formed around the contour of each aperture in the embraced layer, said overlap being bent over the edge surfaces of the perforatlon in the embraced layer so as partially to cover them.

6. In a self-c0ntained tobacco-moistener adapted for use as an integral unit, the combination with an apertured moisture-retaining la er of moisture-impervious material secure to the sides of said layer so as to leave opposite edges of the latter exposed and adapted to project beyond the exposed edges of said layer on at least one side thereof, the said moisture-impervious material having apertures adjacent to at least one surface of the moisture-retaining layer which correspond to, and are slightly smaller than, the

apertures in the said layer, so that an overlap is formed around the contour of each aperture in the moisture-retaining layer, said overlap being bent over the edge surfaces of the perforations in the layer so as partially to cover them.

7. In a self-contained tobacco-moistener adapted for use as an integral unit, the combination with an apertured moisture-retaining layer of flexible moisture-impervious material secured to the sides of said layer so as to leave opposite edges of the latter exposed and adapted to PIOjGCt beyond the exposed edges of said layer on at least one side thereof, the said moisture-impervious material having apertures adjacent to at least one surface of the moisture-retaining layer which correspond to, and are slightly smaller than, the apertures in the said layer, so that an overlap is formed around the contour of each aperture in the moisture-retaining layer, said overlap being bent over the edge surfaces of the perforations in the layer so as partially to cover them.

8. In a self-contained tobacco-moistener adapted for use as an integral unit, the combination with an apertured moisture-retaining layer of flexible metallic moisture-impervious material secured to the sides of said layer so as to leave opposite edges of the latter exposed and adapted to project beyond the exposed edges of said layer on at least one surface of the moisture-retaining'layer which correspond to, and are slightly smaller than, the apertures in the said layer, so that an overlap is formed around the contour of Bit each aperture in the moisture-retaining layer, said overlap being bent over the edge surface of the perforations in the layer so as partially to cover them.

In testimony whereof I have signed my name to this specification.

KARL GRUNWALD.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2561798 *9 Feb 194824 Jul 1951Chester SheetsFood protecting blanket
US3052416 *25 Jan 19614 Sep 1962Marcus L FreudEvaporator plates
US3964684 *15 Oct 197522 Jun 1976Globol-Werk GmbhDeodorizing or perfuming assembly
US5035731 *30 Mar 199030 Jul 1991Philip Morris Management Corp.Containing bubber
US5037459 *20 Feb 19906 Aug 1991Philip Morris Management Corp.Device for controlling relative humidity within a substantially sealed container
US62444329 Aug 199912 Jun 2001Albert L. SaariHumidity control device for gun cases
US657959531 May 200117 Jun 2003Fempro Inc.Liquid absorbing sheet for an exuding food product
Classifications
U.S. Classification239/56
International ClassificationA24F25/02, A24F25/00
Cooperative ClassificationA24F25/02
European ClassificationA24F25/02