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Publication numberUS1321785 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication date11 Nov 1919
Filing date22 Mar 1917
Publication numberUS 1321785 A, US 1321785A, US-A-1321785, US1321785 A, US1321785A
InventorsFrederick Henry Bronner
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
of portland
US 1321785 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

F. H. BRONNER. SEEE FEEDING INKING PAD EUR RUBBER STAMPS AND THE LIKE. APPLICATION FILED MAR. 22I I9l7.

1 ,321,785. I Patented Nov. 11, 1919.

ederiakmzmer UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

FREDERICK HENRY BRONNER, OF PORTLAND, OREGON, ASSIGNOR T0 THE IRWIN- I-IODSON COMPANY, 0F PORTLAND, OREGON7 A CORPORATION 0F OREGON.

SELF-FEEDING IN KING-PAD FOR RUBBER STAMPS AND THE LIKE.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented Nov. 11, 1919.

Application led March 22, 1917. Serial No. 156,786.

To aZZ whom t may Concern.'

Be it known that I, FREDERICK H. BRON- NER, a 'citizen of the United States, and a resident of Portland, county of Multnomah, State of Oregon, have invented a certain new and useful Improvement in Self-Feeding Inking-Pads for Rubber Stamps and the like, of which the following is a speer cation. Y

The object of my invention is to provide an inking pad which is adapted to contain a body of ink suflicient to last for a substantial length of time; furthermore, a pad which may be readily and conveniently charged with ink, that is to say, neither requiring much time nor muc-h attention in this operation.

It is further my object to ink my pad by the process of absorption directed from the bottom of the inking layer upward, instead of from the outer or top face of the pad downward; because the latter mode of applying the ink requires the ink to be spread evenly over the surface, and since the process of absorption is slow, it requires considerable time to properly ink a pad, especially if the same is of some size.

I attain my object by providing my pad with an ink storing cavity, and with means for distributing the ink from such cavity evenly throughout the inking pad. The construction of my device will be readily understood by having reference to the accompanying drawings, in which:

Figure I shows a sectional perspective, the dotted lines indicating the portion cut away, and the stopper for the inking cavity being also shown, but as removed from the cavity;

Fig. 2 shows the grooved face of the ink distributing disk or layer;

Fig. 3 shows a portion of the wire cloth constituting a perforated layer placed on the ink distributing layer; and

Fig. 4 is a detail of the stopper for closing the ink holding cavity of my pad.

The base, a, is preferably cast in a suitable form, of some gelatinous material. The gelatinous composition which I use is substantially the same as that used for making the rollers of printing presses, which, as well known, consists of table syrup approximately 26%, glue 50%, glycerin 22%, and oil of peppermint 2%, the latter ingredient having a. tendency to harden the gelatinous mass, and, furthermore,,serves to eliminate the offensive odor of the glue. Said base is made with an ink-holding cavity ZJ. c is the ink-distributing disk or layer, preferably made of rubber, or other material impervious to the ink, and it is formed as shown in Fig. 2, that is to say, it has an opening d at the center corresponding with the cross-section of the ink-holding cavity Z) of the base, and from such cavity radiate ink-feeding grooves e, 7. It is also made with concentric rim-like protrusions g, It, the .longer ink-distributing grooves f leading to the circular surface z' between the rims g, 't, and the shorter ink-feeding` grooves e leading to the surface j within the rim g. On the center of the ink-distributing layer o is placed a perforated layer le, which may be made of any suitable material, but I have found it convenient to make the same of wire interwoven, and in this way obtaining an undulating surface serving to keep the layer of absorbent material Z, preferably made of felt-which constitutes the working surface of the pad-spaced from the ink-distributing layer c, and so permits the latter to properly fulfil its function of evenly distributing the ink from said cavity over the under surface of the disk Z.

In constructing my pad I rst lay the disk of felt in the bottom of the mold, the latter being preferably adapted to cast the base a. of the shape shown. Then I lay the wire over the center of the disk'and cover the wire with the ink-distributing layer or disk c, the grooved face of the latter resting on the wire, and then cement or otherwise fasten the disk c in place on the felt disk Z. Preferably the top surfaces of the rims g, are cemented to the felt and then serve to keep the gelatinous substance from running into the disk, ink grooves and surfaces between said rims, while molding the base a. I then insert a tube where the cavity is to be formed, then pour the gelatinous substance, of which the base is to be formed, into the mold.

m represents the stopper for the ink-holding cavity Z). When charging the pad the same is inverted and permitted to remain so for a. few minutes to give the ink an opportunity to run along the grooves of the inkdistributing layer @and so become spread over the under side of the felt layer.

My inking pad shouldonly be used with good quality glycerin rubber stamp ink, the

so'called quick-dryingr inks containing more or less ereosote, Whi' l1 is inclined to have a detrimental effect on the pad.

,I claim 1. An inking pad comprising a gelatinous base provided with an ink-holding cavity, an ink-distributing layer of mat-erial impervious to the ink having an opening corresponding with said cavity of the base and having ink distributing grooves leading therefrom,- and a top layer of absorbent materialy constituting the mking surface, said vtop layer, being integrally amalgamated with said gelatinous lbase around the circumferential portion of' the latter.

- Y 2. An inking pad comprising a gelatinous base provided with an ink-holding cavity, an ink-distributing layer of material impervious to the ink having an opening corresponding-with said cavity of the base and constitutingthe inking surface, and a perforated layer having undulating surfaces between said' ink-distributing layer and the under side of said absorbent layer, said top layer vbeing integrally amalgamated with said gelatinous base around the circumferential portion of the latter.

t.` An inking pad comprising a gelatinous base provided with an ink-holding cavity, an ink-,distributing layer of material impervious to the ink having an opening correspending with said cavity ofthe baser and having ink-distributing grooves leading therefrom, a top layer of absorbentmaterial constitutingthe inkingsurface, and a perforated layer of woven wire between said inkdistributing` layer and the under side of said absorbent layer, said top layer being integrally amalgamated with said gelatinous base around the circumferential portion of the latter.

5. In an inking pad comprising a gelatinous base provided with an ink-holding cavity, and an ink-distributing layer of material impervious to the ink having an opening corresponding with said cavity of the base and having ink-distributing grooves leading therefrom, and further provided with peripheral rims inclosing spaces fed by said ink-distributing grooves, said top layer being integrally amalgamated with said gelatinous base around the circumferential portion of the latter.

G. In an inking pad comprising a gelatinous base provided with an ink-holding cavity, an ink-distributing layer of material impervious to the ink having an opening corresponding with said cavity of the base and having ink-distributing grooves radiating therefrom, and further provided with peripheral rims inclosing` spaces fed by said ink-distributing grooves, a top layer of absorbent material constituting the inking surface, a perforated layer between said inkdistributing layer and the underside of said absorbent layer, said top layer being integrally amalgamated with said gelatinous base around the circumferential portion of the latter.

7. An inking pad comprising a gelatinous base provided with an ink-holding cavity, an ink-distributing layer of material impervious to the ink having an opening corresponding with said cavity of the base and having ink distributing grooves leading` therefrom, a top layer of absorbent material vconstituting the inking surface, a perforated layer between said ink-distributing layer and the under side of said absorbent layer, and a stopper for the cavity of the base, said top layer being integrally amalgamated with said gelatinous base around the circumferential portion of the latter.

S. An article as specified in claim 7, the perforated layer being made of woven wire.

FREDERICK HENRY BRONNER.

Copies of this patent may be obtained for ve cents each, by addressing the Commissioner of Patents.

` Washington, D. C.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2771026 *6 Feb 195020 Nov 1956Mooney Laurence RStencil assembly
US6123469 *22 Nov 199426 Sep 2000Seiko Epson CorporationInk-supply wire dot matrix printer head
US6145974 *7 Jun 199514 Nov 2000Seiko Epson CorporationInk-supplied printer head and ink container
US617662924 Jan 199723 Jan 2001Seiko Epson CorporationInk supply tank for a printer
US623124827 Sep 199615 May 2001Seiko Epson CorporationInk supply tank for a printer
US62478037 Jun 199519 Jun 2001Seiko Epson CorporationInk jet recording apparatus and method for replenishing ink in the tank cartridge
US62767857 Jun 199521 Aug 2001Seiko Epson CorporationInk-supplied printer head and ink container
US64747988 Dec 19995 Nov 2002Seiko Epson CorporationInk supplied printer head and ink container
US685483527 Aug 200215 Feb 2005Seiko Epson CorporationInk cartridge for ink jet printer and method of charging ink into said cartridge
Classifications
U.S. Classification118/264
Cooperative ClassificationB05C1/06