Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS1284728 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication date12 Nov 1918
Filing date20 Feb 1911
Priority date20 Feb 1911
Publication numberUS 1284728 A, US 1284728A, US-A-1284728, US1284728 A, US1284728A
InventorsLawrence W Luellen
Original AssigneeIndividual Drinking Cup Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Cup.
US 1284728 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

L. W. LUELLEN.

CUP.

APPLICATION FILED FEB. 20, I911- Patented Nov. 12, 1918.

My 6 xzw a W UNITED sTA'rns PATENT OFFICE.

LAWBENCE W. LUELLEN, OF NEW YORK, N. Y., ASSIGNOR TO INDIVIDUAL DRINKING CUP COMPANY OF NEW YORK, N. Y., A CORPORATION OF MAINE.

CUP.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented oil. 12, 1918.

Application filed February 20, 1911. Serial No. 609,756.

at New York, borough of Manhattan, in the county and State of New York, have invented a new and useful Cup, of which the following is aspecification.

As a hygienic measure, and as a matter of convenience, drinking vessels are now frequently manufactured of such inexpensive, flexible material as paper so treated as to be waterproof. In that type of these vessels which is of open or permanently cup-like form, as distinguished from those normally folded and which must be separated by the user, it is necessary that they shall be so stable as to effectually resist collapse in the hands, and that their parts shall be of such strength that they may not be readily torn or displaced by spoons or like utensils or by engagement with the delivery mechanism of dispensing or vending apparatus. Still, it is desirable that to prevent repeated use they may be destroyed by manual pressure. B my invention these results are attained by disposing the cup material, and particularly that of the side walls and flange, in such a manner that a minimum weight offers a maximum resistance to normal stresses. Furthermore, I have produced a drinking vessel of this class which is free from objectionable appearance and feeling characteristic of the usual methods of manufacture. hat constitutes my invention may be best appreciated from the following description and claims, the latter being understood as not. limited to the embodiment illustrated and described in detail.

Figure 1 0f the accompanying drawings shows a blank from which my improved cup may be formed; Fig. 2 is a perspective view of the cup in process of formation; Fig. 3 is a side elevation of said cup; Fig. 4: is a central vertical section therethrough; and Fig. 5 shows a top plan view.

Inall figures of the drawings like characters of reference are employed to designate similar parts.

One way of carr ing out my invention is as follows: A blan A is cut from the desired material in the segmental form appearing in Fig. l of the drawings. For this purpose I prefer some such fibrous mater al as rag-paper, in which the fibers are d1sposed throughout in. the same general direction, the material ofl'ering the greatest res 1stance to rupture at right angles to this line. The blank is so cut from the stock that the fibers lie parallel to the central axis of the segment; that is,

to a radius midway between the ends of the blank, a portion of these fibers being indicated by the lighti broken lines (1,

Upon the completion of the blank, there is applied to it a coating of a fluid substance which is both an adhesive and a waterproofing agent. Heated paratfin is especially adapted for this purpose, having the further advantage of remaining for some time in a plastic condition upon cooling before it finally sets. For reasons which will appear, this coating although preferably covering the entire area of the blank is divided between opposite sides; half shown at b bein upon one face of the blank to the left of the median line as, as viewed in Fig. 1, and. the other half, 0, being upon the opposite face to the right of said line. Such a quantity of the paraflin is employed in the coating, as to penetrate and fill the spaces between the fibers without passing through to the other face, and to leave upon the side of application a thin yet tangible film.

The blank-strip with the paraffin stil fluid is then subjected to the first step in the actualformation of the cup, it being rolled upon itself into the frustum of a cone, conveniently over a tapered core, with the coated surface 7) outward, as appears in Fig. 2, a circular bottom-piece 11 of pasteboard or the like being held within the cup at right angles to the axis and at some little distance from the lower or small end. end (i of the blank has reached the center line a: one layer of the side wall 10 of the cup will have taken shape. The rolling of the strip continues, the coated surfaces 6 and 0 now contacting with one another until a tapered tube with a complete double wall results, with preferably a slight overlap at 12 to insure the completion of the plural layers. Between the layers of paper is a layer 13 of parafiin furnished by the coalescing of the two films. With this layer 13 still in a plastic condition, the bottom 11 is forced down to the position which it is to finally occupy, and on account of the taper of the tubular wall produces an annular groove or depr ssion 14 in which it seats itself. At an ap ropriate time, the wall When the layers are pressed together and the upper edge turned over at right angles to the axis to provide a flange 15, which is especially adapted to be engaged by delivery mechanism. All this is accomplished while the paraffin is still plastic. WVhen it solidifies there results a multiple Wall and flange combining the strength and rigidity of the layers of fibrous material and paraffin. The latter is entirely concealed, leaving both the interior and the exterior of the cup practically unchanged; and by the manner of application, in plural light coatings, the operations are renderedcleanly, with freedom from waste and without danger from an excess' soaking through the paper.

It must be noted that in the completed cup the fibers a of each layer of paper, through the rolling in tapered form, assume angular positions with respect to those of the other layer, as will be best understood by reference to Fig. 3, those of the first layer being inclined-upwardly and toward the left, and those of the outer layer toward the right. Because of this, there is no direction in which the flange and wall may be readily torn, since at least one layer of the fibers will be presented transversely to the rupturing stress. A greater resistance to distortion is also offered, this being of especial importance as regards the flange and the depression in which the bottom rests.

It is obvious that many modifications and changes may be made in the construction shown in the drawings without departing from the spirit and scope of my invention, and I do not mean to limit myself to the particular form or forms shown and described.

Having thus described my invention, I claim:

1. A cup having a side wall consisting of a plurality of layers of flexible fibrous material, the fibers extending generally from top to bottom of the wall but lying at an angle with one another in adjacent layers.

2. A vessel having a side wall circular in section and consisting of a continuous strip of paper rolled upon itself in a plurality of layers, the fibers ofthe paper being disposed transversely of the strip.

3. A paper drinking cup, comprising side walls, a bottom and a stiffening rim having a free edge projecting outward from the upper edge thereof to constitute a lip-engaging flange and being formed of a plurality of thicknesses of paper, reinforced by parafiin.

4. A paper drinking cup, having side walls and a bottom piece and having an outwardly-presented lip-engaging portion reinforced by parafiin interposed between a plurality of layers of paper.

5. A drinking cup having side walls and a bottom formed of paper, fiber or the like,

Leeagrae and having at its upper open edge a plurality of layers of paper between which paraffin is interposed to constitute a smooth lip on the cup.

(3. A drinking cup having its side walls and bottom formed of paper, fiber or the like, and having a rim at the upper edge thereof formed by turning out the upper edge of the side wall to form a free lip flange composed of at least two thicknesses of paper and having paraffin between said thicknesses.

7. A drinking cup having side walls and a bottom formed of paper and having a stiffening rim projecting outward from and being a free lip flange integra with the upper edge of said side walls and comprising a plurality of thicknesses of paper having paraffin therebetween,

8. A drinking cup having side Walls and an outwardly projecting free lip flange at the upper edge thereof formed of a single blank of paper disposed upon itself and secured in place by paraffin or the like.

9. A drinking cup having side walls and an outwardly projecting free lip fla ge at the upper edge thereof, the said side Walls and flange being formed from a single blank of paper, portions of which overlap and are held in place by paraffin.

10. A drinking cup having side walls and an outwardly turned free lip flange made of a single piece of paper, said flange including a. plurality of thicknesses of paper held together by paraffin.

11. A drinking cup having side walls and a free lip flange at the upper edge thereof, said side walls and flange being formed from a single blank of paper, portions of which overlap and are held in place by paraflin, the edge of said blank forming the fiange projecting outward and constituting the greatest diameter of the cup.

12. A drinking cup having side walls, the upper edge of which is turned outward to form a free lip fiange or rim, formed of a single blank of paper rolled upon itself and secured both in the body and rim portions by parafiin or the like, the edge of the blank forming the rim constituting the greatest diameter of the cup.

13. As a new article of manufacture, a drinking cup, having integral side wall portlons of thin paper formed double by in timately overlaying the paper upon itself, said wall portions being coated and impregnated with paraffin and cemented in position by the paraffin, said paraffin being the only secur ng means added to the paper and constituting a stiffening layer between the thin wall portions.

14. As a new article of manufacture, a drinking cup, having integral side Wall portions of thin paper formed double by intimately overlaying the paper upon itself,

the verlying portions being pressed together and coated with a sanitary water-proofing permeating coating which alone cements the overlying portions in position and reinforces the same.

15. As a new article of manufacture, a destructible receptacle, formed with integral paper side wall portions of thin paper formed double by intimately-overlaying the paper upon itself and tapering from the top inwardly toward the bottom of' the receptacle, the overlying portions being pressed together and giving the cup a substantially smooth surface, and a coating of fusible, cementitious material of slight adhesive properties on the side wall portions making the same Water-proof and holding alone the overlying portions in position and reinforcing the same.

16. A drinkingcup, having a side wall portion of thin paper formed double by intimately overlaying the integral paper upon itself to be capable of maintaining a predetermined-outline when the overlying portions are secured togethensaid wall portion merging into an outwardly extending free lip portion, and a strengthener and binder of paraiiin applied to the cup alone cementing the overlylng portions of the double wall together, and continuing therethrough and through the lip portion thereof, and around the juncture therebetween, to stiffen the same.

17. As a new article of manufacture, a drinking cup, formed with a downwardly tapered side wall of paper including intimately superimposed integral layers of thin paper impregnated with and held together by a fusible cement constituting a stiffening layer between the thin wall portions.

18. A drinking cup, formed with a side wall of thin paper and having free lip-engaging edge portion formed of a plurality of intimate integral layers of the paper reinforced with parafiin between and uniting the layers. 4

Signed at Boston in the county of Suffolk and State of Massachusetts, this l3thday of February, 1911.

LAWRENCE W. LUELLEN.

Witnesses:

' HARLEY W. CrnrrENDEN, AUSTIN M. PINKHAM.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2737332 *13 Jul 19516 Mar 1956Lily Tulip Cup CorpOne-piece paper container
US2969901 *31 Oct 195631 Jan 1961American Can CoFlat bottom paper container
US3908523 *5 Nov 197330 Sep 1975Dainippon Printing Co LtdMethod of making liquid-tight cup
US4781321 *18 Aug 19871 Nov 1988Susumuu KoyataContainer and method for producing same
US5660326 *30 Apr 199626 Aug 1997Sherwood Tool IncorporatedMulti-layered insulated cup formed from folded sheet
US5964400 *13 Jun 199712 Oct 1999Sherwood Tool IncMulti-layered insulated cup formed from folded sheet
US6085970 *30 Nov 199811 Jul 2000Insulair, Inc.Insulated cup and method of manufacture
US61964546 Jun 20006 Mar 2001Insulair, Inc.Insulated cup and method of manufacture
US62574857 Aug 200010 Jul 2001Insulair, Inc.Insulated cup and method of manufacture
US6378766 *5 Mar 200130 Apr 2002Insulair, Inc.Insulated cup and method of manufacture
US642245623 Jan 200223 Jul 2002Insulair, Inc.Three-layered insulated cup and method of manufacture
US745850412 Oct 20062 Dec 2008Huhtamaki Consumer Packaging, Inc.Multi walled container and method
US772655118 Apr 20081 Jun 2010Shamrock Cups, LlcContainer with folding lid
US776704912 Oct 20063 Aug 2010Dixie Consumer Products LlcMulti-layered container having interrupted corrugated insulating liner
US79220715 Aug 200812 Apr 2011Huhtamaki, Inc.Multi walled container and method
US799325426 Oct 20079 Aug 2011Huhtamaki, Inc.Multi walled container and method
USRE35830 *16 Aug 199630 Jun 1998Insul-Air Holdings, Inc.Multi-layered insulated cup formed of one continuous sheet
Classifications
U.S. Classification229/4.5, 229/400, 493/148
Cooperative ClassificationB65D3/22