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Publication numberCA1253416 A
Publication typeGrant
Application numberCA 474929
Publication date2 May 1989
Filing date22 Feb 1985
Priority date29 Feb 1984
Also published asCA1253416A1, DE3560595D1, EP0155712A1, EP0155712B1, US4621663, US4749007
Publication numberCA 1253416 A, CA 1253416A, CA 474929, CA-A-1253416, CA1253416 A, CA1253416A
InventorsJosef Malmendier
ApplicantJosef Malmendier, Asten Group, Inc., Astenjohnson, Inc., Asten, Inc.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: CIPO, Espacenet
Cloth, particularly for paper-manufacturing machine, and method for manufacturing same
CA 1253416 A
Abstract
A B S T R A C T

There is described a cloth for draining and drying paper webs, comprising a fabric formed by warp threads and weft threads.
Said cloth further comprises a top layer of inter-laced lengthwise strips and weft threads, at least one upper weft thread part passing underneath one or a plurality of lengthwise strips, being connected to the fabric by at least one warp thread thereof, which has been passed between said upper weft thread part and the lengthwise strip or strips.
Claims(11)
The embodiments of the invention in which an exclusive property or privilege is claimed are defined as follows:
1. Cloth, particularly fabric or felt for draining and drying paper webs in paper-manufacturing machines comprising warp threads and weft threads woven together to form a fabric with a single layer or multiple layers, and a top layer formed by interlaced elements, said top layer being connected to the layer or layers of the fabric by interweaving selected threads of said layers and defining a contact area for the paper webs to dry, wherein the top layer is formed by interlaced lengthwise strips and upper weft threads, part at least of an upper weft thread passing underneath one or a plurality of lengthwise strips being connected to said fabric by at least one warp thread thereof, which is passed between said upper weft thread part and the lengthwise strip or strips, the upper weft threads and the lengthwise strips interlaced therewith forming along said contact area.
2. Cloth as defined in claim 1, in which the spacing between each upper weft thread, is wider than the spacing between each weft thread of said fabric.
3. Cloth as defined in claim 2, in which the length-wise strips have a width which is wider than at least the sum of the thickness of two adjacent warp threads and the mutual spacing thereof.
4. Cloth as defined in any one of claims 1, 2 or 3, in which the lengthwise strips are laid side by side, in such a way as to cover substantially completely the fabric surface area.
5. Cloth as defined in any one of claims 1, 2 or 3, in which the upper weft threads have a flattened shape, preferably with a rectangular cross-section.
6. Cloth as defined in any one of claims 1, 2 or 3, in which each upper weft thread part passing underneath one or a plurality of lengthwise strips, is connected to said fabric by a warp thread thereof.
7. Method for preparing a cloth including warp threads and weft threads woven together to form a fabric with a single layer or multiple layers, which cloth further comprises a top layer formed by interlaced lengthwise strips and upper weft threads, and part at least of an upper weft thread passing underneath one or a plurality of lengthwise strips is connected to said fabric by at least one warp thread thereof, which is passed between said upper weft thread part and the lengthwise strip or strips, comprising the steps of forming simultaneously above said fabric, a top layer by interlacing lengthwise strips and upper weft threads, and during the bringingin of each upper weft thread, passing said thread underneath at least one warp thread from said fabric.
8. Method for preparing cloth as defined in claim 7, which comprises forming a top warp from lengthwise strips, spreading at regular intervals said lengthwise threads to open an upper shed, simultaneously stopping the feeding of the warp threads from said fabric, and raising at least one said warp threads to locate same directly under-neath a lengthwise strip in high position, bringing-in an upper weft thread through the thus-formed shed, and there-after closing the upper shed and simultaneously lowering said raised warp thread or threads.
9. Method as defined in claim 8, which comprises bringing-in at least two weft threads from said fabric between the bringing-in of two succeeding upper weft threads.
10. Method as defined in either one of claims 8 and 9, which comprises arranginging side by side the length-wise strips in the top warp.
11. Method as defined in either one of claims 8 and 9, which comprises raising a warp thread from said fabric underneath each lengthwise strip which lies in high position in the upper shed.
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

h~53~6 This invention relates to a cloth, particularly to a fabric or felt for draining and drying paper webs in paper-manufacturing machines, comprising warp threads and weft threads which are woven together to form a fabric with a single layer 5 or multiple layers, as well as to the method for preparing such a cloth.
Cloths for drying paper webs in paper-manufactu-ring machines are already known for a long time. The moist pa-per web is caused to move over drying drums, on which said 10 web is pressed by means of a drying cloth. Examples of drying cloths having warp threads and weft threads so woven together as to form a single-layer- or multi-layer fabric have been disclo-sed for example in W.KUFFERATH, Bindungssysteme von Papier-maschinensieben, Wochenblatt fur Papierfabrikation 5, 1982, pp.l39 15 to 152.
A substantial problem with the drying cloths lies in providing a pressing surface to be laid over the paper web which is as large and as smooth as possible, to improve the drying conditions of the paper web, and avoiding the cloth lea-20 ving traces printed in the dried paper web.
It has been tried to solve such problems by ma-king use in the cloth of warp threads with a cross-section which is not round, but to the contrary rectangular ( see for instance U.S.Patent 4,290,209, published European Application 81 101584.1, 25 or the cloth under Trademark PLANET, sold by the German Com-pany Thomas Joseph Heimbach GmbH & Co). Such cloths, even if they have an enlarged contact area relative to the usual $~

~53~6 cloths, do not solve completely satisfactorily the raised pro-blems .
To solve said problems, there is provided accor-ding to the lnvention, a cloth as described hereinabove, which further comprises a top layer which is formed by interlaced lengthwise strips and top weft threads, and at least part of the top weft thread passing underneath one or a plurality of length-wise strips is connected to said fabric by at least one warp thread thereof, which is passed between said top weft thread 10 part and the lengthwise thread or threads.
In an advantageous embodiment of the invention, the lengthwise threads are arranged side by side, so as to cover substantially completely the fabric surface area.
In a preferred embodiment of the invention, the 15 top weft threads are of flattened shape, preferably with a rec-tangular cross-section.
There is provided according to the invention, a method for preparing a cloth of this kind, said method compri-sing forming a single-layer- or multi-layer fabric by weaving 20 warp threads and weft threads, which method comprises the steps of forming simultaneously above said fabric, a top layer by in-terlacing lengthwise strips and top weft threads, and during each top thread inserting, passing underneath same at least one warp thread from said fabric.
Other details and features of the invention will stand out from the following description, given by way of non limitative example and with reference to the accompanying dra-wings, in which:
Figure 1 is a perspective view of a cloth portion 30 according to the invention.
Figures Z to 4 show lengthwise sections of various embodiments of the cloth according to the invention, figure 4 showing in section the embodiment as shown in figure 1.
Figures 5 to 7, and 8a, 8b, 9a and 9b show cross-sections along lines V-V, VI-VI, VII-VII, VIII-VIII, and IX-IX res-h~5;3~6 pectively in figure 2.
In the various figures, identical or similar ele-ments are designated by the same reference numerals in the va-rious figures.
5The cloth as shown in figures 1 and 4, compri-ses a double fabric 1 formed by warp threads 2 and weft threads 3 which are interlaced in the usual way. Said threads are from a known material, and have properties and parameters which are conventional for cloths intended for drying paper webs as known 10by the man of the art.
Said cloth further comprises a top layer 4 formed by lengthwise strips 5 and weft threads 6, which are called here top weft threads.
In the embodiment as shown in figures 1 and 4, 15the lengthwise strips are arranged side by side in such a way as to cover substantially completely the surface area of fabric 1. The spacing D between the top weft threads 6 is larger than the spacing d between the weft threads 3 of fabric 1. Each top weft thread 6 alternately passes over and underneath succeeding 20lengthwise strips 5.
Each part of top weft thread 6 which passes un-derneath a lengthwise strip 5, simultaneously passes underneath one warp thread 2 from fabric 1, said warp threads being shown in figure 4 in 2 ' . Said warp threads are the ones which retain 25the top layer 4 connected to said double fabric 1.
The lengthwise strips 5 are made from any suita-ble material for drying cloths, as known by the man of the art.
It is notably possible to use a thermoplastic material. The width of the strips is not critical, but it is preferred to have said 30width at least equal to the sum of the thickness of two adjacent warp threads and the mutual spacing thereof. Said strips may for example have a width of about 2.5 mm and a thickness of about 0.1 mm.
The top weft threads 6 in the example as shown ~ ~3~6 in figures 1 and ~, are different from the weft threads 3 of the double fabric 1. They may however be identical in nature or shape, and they may thus also have a round cross-section. It is however preferred to use top weft threads with a flattened cross-section, for example a rectangular one.
In figures 2 and 3 have been shown in lengthwise section, two other embodiments of cloth according to the inven-tion. Said embodiments differ from the one as shown in figure 1 due to the supporting fabric 1 being a single-layer fabric and not a double fabric any more.
For the clearness of the description, reference will be made to figures 5 to 7, and 8a, 8b, 9a and 9b to explain the method for preparing a cloth according to the invention, said figures being cross-section views of the cloth as shown in figure

2, after bringing in each succeeeding weft thread. It appears from said figures that the supporting fabric 1 is formed by wea-ving as usual warp threads, eight of which are shown here (threads 11 to 18), which are moved between high and low po-sitions with determined rates to form a shed, which will be cal-led hereinafter lower shed. Four adjacent warp threads are cove-red by a single lengthwise strip, and thus but two lengthwise strips 19 and 20 have been shown. They form a top warp cove-ring the supporting fabric 1.
During four succeeding steps, a lower weft thread 21, 22, 23 and 24 respectively, is passed through the lower shed, as it appears from figures 5 to 8a, and the lengthwise strips 19 and 20 are retained at the same level. Figure 8a is a section view along line VIII-VIII in figure 2, after bringing the lower weft thread 24 in, but before bringing the upper weft thread 25 in. During the following step as shown in figure 8b, the warps are not fed on, the lengthwise strips 19 and 20 are so moved away as to form a shed, called hereinafter upper shed, and among the two warp threads 14 and 18 passing over the lo-wer weft thread 24, but warp thread 24 is brought to a raised ~3~L6 high position, as shown in said figure 8b, that is directly under-neath the lengthwise strip 19 Iying in high position. An upper weft thread 25 is then also passed through the thus-formed upper shed, by passing thus underneath the warp thread lg from the 5 supporting fabric 1, but along a path Iying in a plane higher than the one fo]lowed by the weft threads 21 to 24.
After closing the upper shed by bringing closer the lengthwise strips 19 and 20, the four following steps are indentical with the ones as shown in figures S to 8a. It is in-10 deed clear that the mutual position of the threads and strips,in the fourth step from said following steps, shown in figure 9a, is identical with the showing in figure 8a. Figure 9a is a cross-section view along line IX-IX in figure 2, after bringing the lower weft thread 29 in, but before bringing the upper weft 15 thread 30 in. During the following step, as shown in figure 9b, the warps are stopped again, the lengthwise strips 19 and 20 are spread in the opposite directions to the position thereof as shown in figure 8b, and the warp thread 18 only is moved to a raised position. A weft thread 30 is then passed through the 20 thus-formed upper shed, by passing thus underneath the warp thread 18 from the supporting fabric 1, in the same plane as weft thread 25.
The embodiment as shown in figure 3 is very simi-lar to the one as shown in figure 2, and only the passage order 25 between the mutual high and low positions of the warp threads are different.
As it appears from figures 2 and 3, the upper weft threads 25 and 30 advantageously have a rectangular cross-section. This has the advantage of minimizing the contact area 30 loss in the few spaced locations where the lengthwise strips pass underneath the upper weft threads.
The cloths according to the invention have relative to the known cloths, the substantial advantage of a marked in-crease in the possible contact area between the cloth and the paper web. Indeed, the presence of a top layer comprised of wide strips Iying side by side, and interlaced only with upper weft threads pertaining to said layer, which have preferably also a flattened cross-section, and this in relatively widely-spa-ced intervals, insures a smooth contact area with an extensionnever obtained before. On the other hand, the connection formed by warp threads from the underlying fabric, between said under-lying fabric and the upper weft threads, insures for said cloth a mechanical strength and a high capacity for pressing the paper web on the drying drums, without simultaneously changing the extension of the contact area obtained with the top layer, and the smooth shape thereof.
It must be understood that the invention is in no way limited to the above embodiments and that many changes may be brought thereto without departing from the scope of the invention as defined by the appended claims.
It is possible to use for the supporting fabric, for example, as weft and warp threads, any type of thread usual-ly used in drying cloths, and notably yarns, multifilaments, mo-nofilaments, mineral-fiber threads, or coated threads.
The material or materials used for manufacturing the supporting fabric threads, or the top layer threads and strips may be selected among those materials which are usually used for drying cloths, some of which may notably be found in the previous publications as mentioned in the preamble to this specification.

Classifications
International ClassificationD21F1/00, D03D11/00
Cooperative ClassificationD21F1/0036, B29L2031/733
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
2 May 2006MKEXExpiry